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Both of these generate an error saying they must be a compile-time constant:

void Foo(TimeSpan span = TimeSpan.FromSeconds(2.0))
void Foo(TimeSpan span = new TimeSpan(2000))

First of all, can someone explain why these values can't be determined at compile time? And is there a way to specify a default value for an optional TimeSpan object?

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4  
Not related to what you ask, but be aware that new TimeSpan(2000) does not mean 2000 milliseconds, it means 2000 "ticks" which is 0.2 milliseconds, or one 10,000-th of two seconds. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jun 15 '13 at 7:59

6 Answers 6

up vote 72 down vote accepted

You can work around this very easily by changing your signature.

void Foo(TimeSpan? span = null) {

   if (span == null) { span = TimeSpan.FromSeconds(2); }

   ...

}

I should elaborate - the reason those expressions in your example are not compile-time constants is because at compile time, the compiler can't simply execute TimeSpan.FromSeconds(2.0) and stick the bytes of the result into your compiled code.

As an example, consider if you tried to use DateTime.Now instead. The value of DateTime.Now changes every time it's executed. Or suppose that TimeSpan.FromSeconds took into account gravity. It's an absurd example but the rules of compile-time constants don't make special cases just because we happen to know that TimeSpan.FromSeconds is deterministic.

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That's quite clever. –  Mike Pateras Jan 30 '10 at 17:58
    
Thats a very nice little solution. –  Ian Sep 23 '10 at 16:00
3  
Now document the default value in <param>, because it's not visible in the signature. –  Colonel Panic Jun 22 '12 at 11:02
1  
I can't do this, I'm using the special value null for something else. –  Colonel Panic Jun 22 '12 at 11:04
7  
Can also use span = span ?? TimeSpan.FromSeconds(2.0); with the nullable type, in method body. Or var realSpan = span ?? TimeSpan.FromSeconds(2.0); to get a local variable which is not nullable. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jun 15 '13 at 8:03

My VB6 heritage makes me uneasy with the idea of considering "null value" and "missing value" to be equivalent. In most cases, it's probably fine, but you might have an unintended side effect, or you might swallow an exceptional condition (for example, if the source of span is a property or variable that should not be null, but is).

I would therefore overload the method:

void Foo()
{
    Foo(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(2.0));
}
void Foo(TimeSpan span)
{
    //...
}
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+1 for that great technique. Default parameters should only be used with const types, really. Else, it's unreliable. –  Lazlo Jan 4 '11 at 5:22
1  
This is the 'time honoured' approach that default values replaced, and for this situation I think this is the least ugly answer ;) On its own it doesn't necessarily work so well for interfaces though, because you really want the default value in one place. In this case I have found extension methods to be a useful tool: the interface has one method with all the parameters, then a series of extension methods declared in a static class alongside the interface implement the defaults in various overloads. –  OlduwanSteve Apr 22 at 16:48

The set of values which can be used as a default value are the same as can be used for an attribute argument. The reason being that default values are encoded into metadata inside of the DefaultParameterValueAttribute.

As to why it can't be determined at compile time. The set of values and expressions over such values allowed at compile time is listed in section 7.18 of the C# lang spec. In terms of values allowed it is limited to

  • Literals including null
  • References to other const values
  • Enumeration values
  • Default value expression

The type TimeSpan does not fit into any of these lists and hence cannot be used as a constant.

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1  
Slight nit-pick: Calling a static method doesn't fit in any of the list. TimeSpan can fit the last one on this list default(TimeSpan) is valid. –  CodesInChaos Aug 8 '11 at 21:43

This works fine:

void Foo(TimeSpan span = default(TimeSpan))

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1  
Welcome to Stack Overflow. Your answer appears to be that you can provide a default parameter value, as long as it's the one very specific value that the compiler allows. Have I understood that right? (You can edit your answer to clarify.) This would be a better answer if it showed how to take advantage of what the compiler allows to get to what the question originally sought, which was to have arbitrary other TimeSpan values, such as that given by new TimeSpan(2000). –  Rob Kennedy Dec 18 '12 at 23:48
void Foo(TimeSpan span = default(TimeSpan))
{
    if (span == default(TimeSpan)) 
        span = TimeSpan.FromSeconds(2); 
}

provided default(TimeSpan) is not a valid value for the function.

Or

//this works only for value types which TimeSpan is
void Foo(TimeSpan span = new TimeSpan())
{
    if (span == new TimeSpan()) 
        span = TimeSpan.FromSeconds(2); 
}

provided new TimeSpan() is not a valid value.

Or

void Foo(TimeSpan? span = null)
{
    if (span == null) 
        span = TimeSpan.FromSeconds(2); 
}

This should be better considering chances of null value being a valid value for the function are rare.

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TimeSpan is a special case for the DefaultValueAttribute and is specified using any string that can be parsed via the TimeSpan.Parse method.

[DefaultValue("0:10:0")]
public TimeSpan Duration { get; set; }
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