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I just created the following model:

class Categoria(models.Model):
    nombre=models.CharField(max_length=30)
    padre=models.ForeignKey('self', blank=True, null=True)

    def __unicode__(self):
        return self.nombre

Then registered to the admin interface and syncdb'd

Everything ok if I just add plain ASCII chars. But if I add a "Categoria" named "á" (to say something) I get:

Environment:

Request Method: GET
Request URL: http://192.168.2.103:8000/administracion/locales/categoria/
Django Version: 1.1.1
Python Version: 2.6.4
Installed Applications:
['django.contrib.auth',
 'django.contrib.contenttypes',
 'django.contrib.sessions',
 'django.contrib.admin',
 'cruzandoelsuquiaDJ.locales']
Installed Middleware:
('django.middleware.common.CommonMiddleware',
 'django.contrib.sessions.middleware.SessionMiddleware',
 'django.contrib.auth.middleware.AuthenticationMiddleware')


Template error:
In template /usr/lib/pymodules/python2.6/django/contrib/admin/templates/admin/change_list.html, error at line 78
   Caught an exception while rendering: ('ascii', '\xc3\xa1', 0, 1, 'ordinal not in range(128)')
   68 :         {% endif %}


   69 :       {% endblock %}


   70 :       


   71 :       <form action="" method="post"{% if cl.formset.is_multipart %} enctype="multipart/form-data"{% endif %}>


   72 :       {% if cl.formset %}


   73 :         {{ cl.formset.management_form }}


   74 :       {% endif %}


   75 : 


   76 :       {% block result_list %}


   77 :           {% if action_form and actions_on_top and cl.full_result_count %}{% admin_actions %}{% endif %}


   78 :            {% result_list cl %} 


   79 :           {% if action_form and actions_on_bottom and cl.full_result_count %}{% admin_actions %}{% endif %}


   80 :       {% endblock %}


   81 :       {% block pagination %}{% pagination cl %}{% endblock %}


   82 :       </form>


   83 :     </div>


   84 :   </div>


   85 : {% endblock %}


   86 : 

Traceback:
File "/usr/lib/pymodules/python2.6/django/core/handlers/base.py" in get_response
  92.                 response = callback(request, *callback_args, **callback_kwargs)
File "/usr/lib/pymodules/python2.6/django/contrib/admin/options.py" in wrapper
  226.                 return self.admin_site.admin_view(view)(*args, **kwargs)
File "/usr/lib/pymodules/python2.6/django/views/decorators/cache.py" in _wrapped_view_func
  44.         response = view_func(request, *args, **kwargs)
File "/usr/lib/pymodules/python2.6/django/contrib/admin/sites.py" in inner
  186.             return view(request, *args, **kwargs)
File "/usr/lib/pymodules/python2.6/django/contrib/admin/options.py" in changelist_view
  986.         ], context, context_instance=context_instance)
File "/usr/lib/pymodules/python2.6/django/shortcuts/__init__.py" in render_to_response
  20.     return HttpResponse(loader.render_to_string(*args, **kwargs), **httpresponse_kwargs)
File "/usr/lib/pymodules/python2.6/django/template/loader.py" in render_to_string
  108.     return t.render(context_instance)
File "/usr/lib/pymodules/python2.6/django/template/__init__.py" in render
  178.         return self.nodelist.render(context)
File "/usr/lib/pymodules/python2.6/django/template/__init__.py" in render
  779.                 bits.append(self.render_node(node, context))
File "/usr/lib/pymodules/python2.6/django/template/debug.py" in render_node
  71.             result = node.render(context)
File "/usr/lib/pymodules/python2.6/django/template/loader_tags.py" in render
  97.         return compiled_parent.render(context)
File "/usr/lib/pymodules/python2.6/django/template/__init__.py" in render
  178.         return self.nodelist.render(context)
File "/usr/lib/pymodules/python2.6/django/template/__init__.py" in render
  779.                 bits.append(self.render_node(node, context))
File "/usr/lib/pymodules/python2.6/django/template/debug.py" in render_node
  71.             result = node.render(context)
File "/usr/lib/pymodules/python2.6/django/template/loader_tags.py" in render
  97.         return compiled_parent.render(context)
File "/usr/lib/pymodules/python2.6/django/template/__init__.py" in render
  178.         return self.nodelist.render(context)
File "/usr/lib/pymodules/python2.6/django/template/__init__.py" in render
  779.                 bits.append(self.render_node(node, context))
File "/usr/lib/pymodules/python2.6/django/template/debug.py" in render_node
  71.             result = node.render(context)
File "/usr/lib/pymodules/python2.6/django/template/loader_tags.py" in render
  24.         result = self.nodelist.render(context)
File "/usr/lib/pymodules/python2.6/django/template/__init__.py" in render
  779.                 bits.append(self.render_node(node, context))
File "/usr/lib/pymodules/python2.6/django/template/debug.py" in render_node
  71.             result = node.render(context)
File "/usr/lib/pymodules/python2.6/django/template/loader_tags.py" in render
  24.         result = self.nodelist.render(context)
File "/usr/lib/pymodules/python2.6/django/template/__init__.py" in render
  779.                 bits.append(self.render_node(node, context))
File "/usr/lib/pymodules/python2.6/django/template/debug.py" in render_node
  81.             raise wrapped

Exception Type: TemplateSyntaxError at /administracion/locales/categoria/
Exception Value: Caught an exception while rendering: ('ascii', '\xc3\xa1', 0, 1, 'ordinal not in range(128)')

My django version is 1.1 and my database is 5.1.37-1ubuntu5 with utf8 charset and the table is using a utf8_bin collation.

This problem seems too basic to be true, and I'm a django newbie so I'm sorry in advance if I'm missing something very simple :)

share|improve this question
    
It seems to me that Django itself should solve these kinds issues by itself. Your should probably try newest Django and MySQL python bindings, make sure you have all the strings in unicode (and unicode headers in your python sources -- # -*- coding: utf-8 -*-). If nothing of this helps I'd consider filing it as a bug in Django. –  che Jan 30 '10 at 18:48
    
One would think that... I'll try filing the bug. –  Ezequiel Jan 30 '10 at 19:42

6 Answers 6

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Django generally has very good Unicode support (see the Django 1.1 "Unicode data" documentation for details). In my code I find that, if I'm having a problem with simple Unicode features, the problem usually is that I'm not understanding Django's details well, not that Django has a bug in its Unicode support.

The "Unicode Data" page tells us that "All of Django’s database backends ... automatically convert strings retrieved from the database into Python Unicode strings. You don’t even need to tell Django what encoding your database uses: that is handled transparently." So your simple return self.nombre should return a Python Unicode string.

However, the Django 1.1 "Databases" page has an important note about how the MySQL backend handles the utf8_bin collation:

...if you really want case-sensitive comparisons on a particular column or table, you would change the column or table to use the utf8_bin collation. The main thing to be aware of in this case is that if you are using MySQLdb 1.2.2, the database backend in Django will then return bytestrings (instead of unicode strings) for any character fields it returns receive from the database. This is a strong variation from Django's normal practice of always returning unicode strings. It is up to you, the developer, to handle the fact that you will receive bytestrings if you configure your table(s) to use utf8_bin collation. Django itself should work smoothly with such columns, but if your code must be prepared to call django.utils.encoding.smart_unicode() at times if it really wants to work with consistent data ...

So, in your original example, the column "nombre" used utf8_bin collation. This meant that self.nombre was returning a Python byte string. When you put it in an expression that required a Python Unicode string, Python performed its default conversion. This is the equivalent of self.nombre.decode('ascii'). And of course, .decode('ascii') fails when it encounters any byte above 0x7F, such as the UTF-8 bytes which encode "á".

You discovered the two ways to solve this problem. The first is to convert the Python byte string returned by self.nombre into a Python Unicode string explicitly. I'll bet the following simpler code would have worked:

return self.nombre.decode('utf8')

The second approach is to change the MySQL collation for column "nombre", which causes Django's MySQL backend to return Python Unicode strings instead of the unusual byte strings. Then your original expression gives a Python Unicode string:

return self.nombre

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, it helps me understanding. I marked your answer as correct because it is so well explained. Thank you –  Ezequiel Feb 2 '10 at 16:58
1  
How do you change the collation type for a MySQL column? –  MikeN May 18 '11 at 19:26
1  
This is a Django bug, IMHO. What do you think? Why would UTF8_bin completely break the rules? –  Sylvain Aug 13 '13 at 17:42
1  
@Sylvain I agree the handling of UTF8_bin is incorrect behaviour. It might be it's a MySQLdb 1.2.2 bug, rather than a Django bug. But I'm not sure. –  Jim DeLaHunt Aug 15 '13 at 21:07
1  
Mucho excelente post, @JimDeLaHunt. That link to the collation docs were great. coupled with your explanation, helped me understand a similar issue I was facing. We had to change the collation directly in the database (you can also write a migration to do it using an explicit MYSQL statement) to utf8_general_ci for us not to get that stupid unicode decode error. –  Josh Brown Mar 21 at 21:20

This problem can be solved by a little bit changing of django's code. Add code below in django/utils/encoding.py

import sys
reload(sys)
sys.setdefaultencoding('utf-8')
share|improve this answer

I had this issue in production and never on the development server.
Then I realized that new tables were created with utf8_bin collation instead of utf8_general_ci.

To see which tables require conversion, type

SHOW TABLE STATUS;

Then convert those with utf8_bin collation by typing

ALTER TABLE app_table CONVERT TO CHARACTER SET utf8 COLLATE utf8_general_ci;

Finally, change the default collation so this doesn't happen again:

ALTER DATABASE my_database character set utf8 collate utf8_general_ci;
share|improve this answer

Ok...

    return u"%s"%(self.nombre.decode('utf8'),)

does the trick.

But also found that changing utf8_bin to utf8_general_ci does the trick, i.e. self.nombre works as expected.

share|improve this answer

I had similar issue when recently changed a MySQL table to use collation utf8_bin in staging while no problem in dev (python2.7, Django1.4.2 in both environments). I found out that in dev I have MySQL-python 1.2.4c1 and in staging I have 1.2.3. Upgrading to MySQL-python 1.2.4 solved the problem for me.

share|improve this answer

I solved by problem by simply creating an Admin Model for the Model and including all variables in "list_display".

share|improve this answer
    
that should be a comment –  Vlad L Sep 10 at 14:31
    
sry, am new here –  user3461003 Sep 11 at 15:12

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