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Which of the following should I use in my stylesheets?

/* Example #1: */ background-image: url(image.png);
/* Example #2: */ background-image: url("image.png");
/* Example #3: */ background-image: url('image.png');

What does the W3C specify as the correct way?

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possible duplicate of CSS background-image - What is the correct usage? –  Robert MacLean Sep 27 '10 at 6:15

4 Answers 4

up vote 129 down vote accepted

The W3C says quotes are optional, all three of your ways are legal.

Opening and closing quote just need to be the same character.

If you have special characters in your URL, you should use quotes or escape the characters (see below).

Syntax and basic data types

The format of a URI value is 'url(' followed by optional white space followed by an optional single quote (') or double quote (") character followed by the URI itself, followed by an optional single quote (') or double quote (") character followed by optional white space followed by ')'. The two quote characters must be the same.

Escaping special characters:

Some characters appearing in an unquoted URI, such as parentheses, white space characters, single quotes (') and double quotes ("), must be escaped with a backslash so that the resulting URI value is a URI token: '\(', '\)'.

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Some older browsers may have issues with quoted urls namely IE Mac. –  mveerman Jun 29 '10 at 17:31
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As an addition to what bic72 said, some older browsers also make dual requests when confronted with quoted URLs in CSS, first they request "myfile.png" then myfile.png - hence the reason I avoid using them. –  pebbl Jun 29 '12 at 14:49
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I see you do not yet have a Guru badge for this. Fixed that for you. –  BoltClock Jun 30 '12 at 21:20
    
FWIW the spec you link to seems to have been rewritten since you posted the second quote. Now commas don't seem to require escaping. –  Ben Jan 11 '13 at 19:59
    
@pebbl -- You're right, and older browsers include the newest version of Chrome on mac. –  Daniel Beardsley Aug 27 '13 at 21:30

Here is what the W3 CSS 2.1 specification says:

The format of a URI value is 'url(' followed by optional white space followed by an optional single quote (') or double quote (") character followed by the URI itself, followed by an optional single quote (') or double quote (") character followed by optional white space followed by ')'. The two quote characters must be the same.

Source: http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS21/syndata.html#uri

So all of the 3 examples you proposed are correct, but the one that I would choose is the first one because you use less characters and hence the resulting CSS file will be smaller, resulting in less bandwidth usage.

This might feel like that is not important, but high traffic websites prefer to save bandwidth and over lots of css files, and url references in them it make sense to choose the option that make the file smaller... Even because there is no advantage in not doing so.

Note: you might have to escape characters if urls contain parentheses, commas, white space characters, single quotes or double quotes. This might make the url longer than just using quotes (which need less escaping). Hence you might want to serve a Css file with urls with no quotes only when the overhead of escaping does not make the url longer than just using quotes (which is very rare).

However I would not expect any human being to even consider these edge cases... A Css optimizer would handle this for you... (but sure you need to know about all of this if you are actually writing a css optimizer :P)

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Don't know why this got down-voted; for a high traffic site, ideas like this makes a big difference over the course of a year. –  Joisey Mike Nov 10 '11 at 21:35
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↑ I really doubt that. How many urls are there per css? Not too much. And you just spared TWO bytes (in ascii or utf-8) in each. Plus, you could actually make the url longer, because you might need to use backslashes. There are much better ways to reduce web's size... –  kralyk Apr 18 '12 at 13:23
    
Obviously it's not much of a saving, but Andrea and Joisey are still correct. As an extreme example, Google only needs to remove one byte from their homepage to save quite a bit of bandwidth ;) –  pebbl Jun 29 '12 at 14:45
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@kralyk... Hence the best thing to do is to not use quotes when not needed... So it's better to use quotes when you have a url with more than two parentheses, commas, white space characters, single quotes or double quotes. Which however I never encountered in a Css file... And I'm pretty sure I never will :) (updated the answer) –  Andrea Zilio Jun 30 '12 at 21:23
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Programmers who concern themselves with the optimization of individual characters from their source codes, are missing the boat entirely -- they'll hardly ever optimize anything at all. Anyways, I always use double-quotes. I'm a man of consistency. –  ChaseMoskal Aug 16 '13 at 22:59

Three ways are legal according to the W3C. If you have special characters in the name (as space) you should use the second or the third.

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Example 2 or 3 are best:

From W3C: The format of a URI value is 'url(' followed by optional white space followed by an optional single quote (') or double quote (") character followed by the URI itself, followed by an optional single quote (') or double quote (") character followed by optional white space followed by ')'. The two quote characters must be the same.

Note from the same explanation, Example 1 is acceptable, if appropriate characters are escaped.

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