Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
  1. I have a relatively positioned div with height and width set.
  2. Then I have an absolutely positioned div (inside #1) with top, width, height set.

What I want is:

  1. If I add contents to inner div (Absolutely positioned), it should grow with the contents despite of its original height set.

  2. If the inner div expands then the outer div (relatively positioned) div should expand as well.

Note: While there have been other answers on stackoveflow.com about removing the positioning from inner div. This can't work for me as I see.

So an answer based on pure CSS (or Javascript if not possible by CSS at all) is what I'm looking for here without touching the positioning elements of the divs at all.

A code snippet [Pardon me, I can't write such noisy CSS myself in the elements, it's my tool :/]. For the sake of clarity I'm posting the code as it is:

<html>
<head>
    <title>New Project</title>
    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8">
</head>
<body style="background-color: lightgray">
    <div id="34ef9e8e-7d99-4690-8788-d2caf23cf33e" style="position: relative; clear: both; margin: 0 auto; top:5; left: 5; height: 300; width: 500; font-family: Arial; font-face: Arial; font-size: 12; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; ; color:#000000; background-color:#ffffff">
        <div id="f79e1b12-d4bb-433b-9e2c-33a3c1b2b89a" style="position: absolute; clear: both; border: 1px solid #000000; top:46; left: 97; height: 200; width: 300; font-family: Arial; font-face: Arial; font-size: 12; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; ; color:#000000; background-color:#ffffff">
            <div style=" background-color: #000000; color: #ffffff; line-height:24px; width: 100%; height: 24px"><span style="padding-left: 2px">Title</span></div>
            <div style="position: relative;">
                Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,<br>
                Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,<br>
                Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,<br>
                Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,<br>
                Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,<br>
                Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,<br>
                Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,<br>
                Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,<br>
                Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,<br>
                Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,<br>
                Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,<br>
                Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,<br>
                Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,<br>
                Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,<br>
                Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,<br>
                Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,<br>
                Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,Blah, Blah,<br>
            </div>
        </div>
    </div>
</body>

share|improve this question
    
Please post your HTML and CSS, or create a jsfiddle. –  ninty9notout Feb 10 '14 at 23:08
    
Does the inner element HAVE to be absolutely positioned? –  ddenhartog Feb 10 '14 at 23:12
    
@ddenhartog well, this html is auto generated by an HTML form designer that I am developing, people can place any component on a page by drag drop, create nested components, so on and so on. It's night mare if I try to do some other tricks instead of getting absolute positioning of elements and generate an HTML. –  ask-dev Feb 10 '14 at 23:17
    
Then you need to use JavaScript because position:absolute takes the element out of the stack. But I think you'll find that absolute and relative will yield the same result. Let me edit my answer for some explanation. –  ddenhartog Feb 10 '14 at 23:19
    
Are you open to using jQuery? It will make things a lot easier. –  David Feb 10 '14 at 23:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Does the inner element HAVE to be absolutely positioned?

If not, you can use min-height, as in this JSFiddle:

.parent{
    position:relative;
    min-height:300px;
    width:300px;
    padding: 30px 0;
    background-color:red;
}
.child{
    position:relative;
    left: 100px;
    min-height: 200px;
    width:100px;
    background-color:yellow;
}

So position:absolute is relative to the most recent ancestor who isn't static, which is the default state (i.e. in your case, your position:relative element.

Look at this JSFiddle to see what I am talking about.

See how the SECOND .absolute div is at the TOP of the page and not the top of the second .parent? That is because the <div> (which is the parent of the SECOND .absolute is the default position:static, SO the SECOND .absolute is positioned absolutely RELATIVE to the body/html/page!

In your use case, INSIDE an element which has position:relative, direct child elements should behave very similarly when using relative/absolute on them.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you please help me understand this? Or a favor could be to rework my example source to behave as expected? Can that layout be achieved without absolute positioning? –  ask-dev Feb 11 '14 at 0:08
    
Sure. But first of all, your styles won't work anyway because not of the values have px after them. See this JSFiddle to see how none of you positioning works, then see this JSFiddle how it does. –  ddenhartog Feb 11 '14 at 0:35
    
Pity though, chrome was giving me exact same output (the second and correct one you mentioned, I'll add px to elements.). Of course browsers tend to be less strict about the syntax errors in html/css. –  ask-dev Feb 11 '14 at 0:38
    
lol. Nevermind, FORGET that! There are ways to do what you want by using wrapper DIVs and padding/margin-top instead of position:top; but you current CSS styles and HTML structure don't support doing this JUST with CSS. –  ddenhartog Feb 11 '14 at 0:55
    
Bleh, okay, fine, here you go: JSFIddle –  ddenhartog Feb 11 '14 at 0:58

You can do this with automatic height and width in your elements, as demonstrated in this fiddle.

Basically, your inner element will resize itself automatically to fill its height and width constraints, but you then have to add javascript/jquery to check the height of the element and make sure that it still fits inside the parent element:

function checkHeight()
{
    var extra = $("#inner").height() + parseInt($("#inner").css("top"));
    if($("#outer").height() < extra)
    {
        $("#outer").height(extra);
    }
}

function checkWidth()
{
    var extra = $("#inner").width() + parseInt($("#inner").css("left"));
    if($("#outer").width() < extra)
    {
        $("#outer").width(extra);
    }
}

If the height of the inner element plus the top of the inner element is greater than the height of the outer element, it sets the height of the outer to that sum.


This works fabulously for height, but there is one thing to note for width. You will have to set the width of the inner element to be larger if you want it to be wider than the largest inline elements.

Text, for example is inline around words, so it will wrap unless you set the width of the inner element to accommodate the width of the text.

Let me explain:

Say I have the inner div's content as something like this:

Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah<br>
Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah

If the width of the div is only big enough to accommodate 4 blahs, it will look like this:

Blah, blah, blah, blah,
blah
Blah, blah, blah, blah,
blah

So to fix this and get the expected result as shown in the code, you will have to set the width of the div to be the same width or bigger than the width of all five blahs.

Make sense?


Fiddle

Happy coding!

share|improve this answer
    
First thing: I'm not worried about widths at all. Just the height. Also now it's a java script solution triggered by a timer. Yes in my case even the contents will grow with a javascript trigger (table will get more rows if a user clicks a button), so in that case I need to grow the current containing div, then it's parent and so on until I reach the top most div. Is this correct? –  ask-dev Feb 11 '14 at 0:08
    
If all of the inner divs have no height attribute set or that set to auto, you'll only need to set the height of the outermost inner div. If not, then your assumption is correct. –  David Feb 11 '14 at 0:15

Use min-height instead of height in your CSS. (Since you haven't posted any details, I can't offer any more specifics.)

You'll have to use JavaScript to set the height of the outer <div> to match the inner one.

Here's a crude fiddle

share|improve this answer
    
won't work because of position:absolute –  ddenhartog Feb 10 '14 at 23:12
    
oh right, the outer container won't expand to include the absolutely positioned inner one. –  Stephen Thomas Feb 10 '14 at 23:17
    
updated answer with working fiddle. –  Stephen Thomas Feb 10 '14 at 23:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.