Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am having "Incorrectly aligned or overlapped by non-object field" error with the following code.

public struct TypeA
{
   public string A1;
   public string A2;
}
public struct TypeB
{
   public string B1,
   public string B2;
}

I implemented union by using System.Runtime.InteropServices with LayoutKind.Explicit

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Explicit)]
public struct TypeAorB
{
   [FieldOffset(0)]
   public TypeA aa;

   [FieldOffset(0)]
   public TypeB bb;
}

I think the issue comes from string in the struct. How do I overcome this problem?

share|improve this question
    
I believe aliasing on managed (non-scalar) types may not be allowed. – 500 - Internal Server Error Feb 10 '14 at 23:13
    
What are you trying to achieve by doing this? – 500 - Internal Server Error Feb 10 '14 at 23:19
    
Thanks guys, what I'm trying to do is to implement maintain a super struct contains multiple struct*(s). It is trying to achieve the *union from C code. Now I understand that reference type can't be overlapped. – sMah Feb 11 '14 at 21:46
up vote 2 down vote accepted

What you are trying to do is not legal. String is a reference type and can't be overlapped with anything else in a union. It matters a great deal to the garbage collector, it can't reliable figure out what reference is stored in a field so it cannot reliable figure out if the string object needs to be kept alive.

What's bizarro about your structs is that you overlap a string with a string. Which would technically work, no reason for the garbage collector to be confused since it always sees a valid object reference. But it doesn't actually handle that special case, Microsoft didn't write enough code, or cared to burn the cpu cycles, to check for the type identity.

And that's for a good reason because you don't have to overlap them in your declaration. No point for Microsoft to write the special code to recognize the overlap when you can trivially avoid it.

And is turtles all the way down in your example, every field of union is identical. So there isn't any point at all in using a union.

So don't.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply and explanation. – sMah Feb 11 '14 at 21:38

Why are the fieldoffsets the same? They should be 0 and 0+[size of TypeA].

Type A is 8 bytes as you have 2x strings, and each one will use a 4 byte pointer.

Therefore...

    [StructLayout(LayoutKind.Explicit)]
    public struct TypeAorB
    {
        [FieldOffset(0)]
        public TypeA aa;

        [FieldOffset(8)]
        public TypeB bb;
    }

If you were to add a third field of typeB again, you'd need to do:

    [StructLayout(LayoutKind.Explicit)]
    public struct TypeAorB
    {
        [FieldOffset(0)]
        public TypeA aa;

        [FieldOffset(8)]
        public TypeB bb;

        [FieldOffset(16)]
        public TypeB bb;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Jon, It's helpful information. – sMah Feb 11 '14 at 21:37
    
Because he's trying to create a union. – Mitch Feb 12 '14 at 23:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.