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I am trying to convert list of tuples (example z below) to z1. First 2 items in z can be same and so becomes common field in result's dictionary. Please below. My attempt is shown as well but it fails to group common element? Any help?

FROM:

z= [(53, 'example 2', 2, 'instagram', 'nyc'),
    (53, 'example 2', 5, 'instagram', 'detroit'),
    (53, 'example 2', 7, 'twitter', 'harlem'),
    (50, 'example 5', 8, 'twitter', 'harlem'),
    (27, 'example 6', None, None, None), 
   ]

TO:

z1=[
 {'id':        53,
  'name':      'example 2',
  'hashtags':  [ { 'tag_id': 2, 'platform': 'instagram', 'tagname': 'nyc' },
                 { 'tag_id': 5, 'platform': 'instagram', 'tagname': 'detroit' },
                 { 'tag_id': 7, 'platform': 'twitter',   'tagname': 'harlem' },
               ]
 },
 {'id':        50,
  'name':      'example 2',
  'hashtags':  [ { 'tag_id': 8, 'platform': 'twitter', 'tagname': 'harlem' },
               ]
 },
 {'id':        27,
  'name':      'example 6',
  'hashtags':  [ { 'tag_id': None, 'platform': None, 'tagname': None },
               ]
 },
]

My Attempt:

ld = []
for a, b, c, d, e in z:
    ld.append({ 'id':       a,
                'name':     b,
                'tag_id':   c,
                'hashtags': [{'platform': d, 'hashtag':  e}, ]
             })

print ld

Output:

[
 {'id':        53,
  'name':      'example 2',
  'hashtags':  [ { 'tag_id': 2, 'platform': 'instagram', 'tagname': 'nyc' }]
 },
 {'id':        53,
  'name':      'example 2',
  'hashtags':  [ { 'tag_id': 5, 'platform': 'instagram', 'tagname': 'detroit' }]
 },
 {'id':        53,
  'name':      'example 2',
  'hashtags':  [ { 'tag_id': 7, 'platform': 'twitter',   'tagname': 'harlem' },]
 },
 {'id':        50,
  'name':      'example 2',
  'hashtags':  [ { 'tag_id': 8, 'platform': 'twitter', 'tagname': 'harlem' },
               ]
 },
 {'id':        27,
  'name':      'example 6',
  'hashtags':  [ { 'tag_id': None, 'platform': None, 'tagname': None },
               ]
 },
]
share|improve this question
    
Don't forget to mark the answer you end up using. – Geoff Feb 11 '14 at 4:00
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem is that you aren't looking to see if you've already added a dict with the given id to ld ("Have I already added the element with id 53 to the list?"). You need to check to see if you've already added it.

The first thing that comes to mind is storing previous ids in a dict mapping the to the index. This doesn't increase the runtime complexity.

ld = []
encountered_id_index = {}
for a, b, c, d, e in z:
    if a in encountered_id_index:
        index = encountered_id_index[a]
        ld_dict = ld[index]
        ld_dict['hashtags'].append({'platform': d, 'hashtag': e, 'tag_id': c})
    else:
        ld.append({ 'id': a,
                    'name': b,
                    'hashtags': [{'platform': d, 'hashtag': e, 'tag_id': c}]
        })
        index = len(ld) - 1
        encountered_id_index[a] = index

This is untested, but I think that should get the job done.

Unrelated, but I'd recommend changing the variable names in the for loop to something more meaningful. "id" instead of "a", "name" instead of "b", etc. I promise you that if you learn to properly name your variables now, you'll have fewer headaches in the future. It dramatically increases readability of your code.

share|improve this answer
1  
100% in agreement of not naming variables appropriately. Will change that. – NullException Feb 11 '14 at 0:10
1  
A quick comment for OP extending Geoff's note about variable naming: the ability to troubleshoot by catching an exception and printing something like "a is {a} and b is {b} and c is {c}".format(**locals()) is important enough reason to do: "Exception during parsing of tag.\n id: {id}\n name: {name}\ntag_id : {tag_id}\n platform: {platform}\n tagname: {tagname}".format(**locals()). Just be sure to lose any reference to locals before you ship the code to production -- you really shouldn't be relying on exposing your whole namespace in order to make code work! – Adam Smith Feb 11 '14 at 0:11
1  
@Geoff - accepted (with minor edit) your answer for it's simplicity, elegance and without using any other data structure. Though for learning, I will try out other answers as well. tx – NullException Feb 11 '14 at 16:12
    
I always mix up add and append in Python. Java is engrained in my head. I just removed some redundant code to make my solution slightly shorter. – Geoff Feb 11 '14 at 17:05
from collections import defaultdict, namedtuple

HashTag = namedtuple('HashTag', ['tag_id', 'platform', 'tag_name'])

class Entries:
    def __init__(self):
        self.entries = defaultdict(list)

    def add_entry(self, id, name, tag_id, platform, tag_name):
        key = (id, name)
        value = HashTag(tag_id, platform, tag_name)
        self.entries[key].append(value)

z1 = Entries()
for entry in z:
    z1.add_entry(*entry)

... the only thing I don't like about this is that you need to know both the id and name to look up an entry. If I were using this seriously, I would modify it to index entries only on id, then have a second dict linking name to id, then implement __ getitem __ such that it will do a lookup on either id or name.

share|improve this answer
    
should do class Entries(object): to follow new-style class definitions (allowing things like decorators and etc). Otherwise a superb answer I was struggling through myself. – Adam Smith Feb 11 '14 at 0:04
    
@adsmith: for Python 2.x, yes; no longer necessary in Python 3.x – Hugh Bothwell Feb 11 '14 at 0:05

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