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Short question:

Why did .Net Framework add a lot of *Async versions of method instead of developers just using Task.Run to run synchronous methods asynchronously?

Detailed question:

  • I understand the concept of asynchronisity.
  • I know about Tasks
  • I know about the async/await keywords.
  • I know what *Async methods in .Net Framework do.

What I don't understand is the purpose of the *Async methods in the library.

Suppose that you have two lines of code:

F1();
F2();

With respect to the data/control flow there are only two cases:

  • F2 need to be executed after F1 finishes.
  • F2 does not need to wait for F1 to finish.

I don't see any other cases. I don't see any general need to know the concrete thread that executes some function (apart from UI). The base execution mode of code in a thread is synchronous. The parallelism requires multiple threads. The asynchronisity is based on parallelism and code reordering. But the base is still synchronous.

The difference does not matter when the F1's workload is small. But when A takes a lot of time to finish, we may need to look at the situation and, if F2 does not need to wait for F1 to finish, we can run F1 in parallel with F2.

Long time ago we did that using threads/thread pools. Now we have Tasks.

If we want to run F1 and F2 in parallel, we can write:

var task1 = Task.Run(F1);
F2();

tasks are cool and we can use await in places where we finally need the task to be finished.

So far, I don't see any need to make an F1Async() method.

Now, let's look at some special cases. The only real special case I see is UI. The UI thread is special and stalling it makes the UI freeze which is bad. As I see it, Microsoft advices us to mark the UI event handlers async. Marking the methods async means that we can use the await keyword to basically schedule the heavy processing on another thread and free the UI thread until the processing is finished.

What I don't get again is why do we need any *Async methods to be able to await them. We can always just write await Task.Run(F1);. Why would we need F1Async?

You may say that the *Async methods use some special magic (like handling external signals) that make them more efficient than their synchronous counterparts. The thing is that I don't see this beeing the case.

Let's look at the Stream.ReadAsync for example. If you look at the source code, ReadAsync just wastes several hundred lines of bells and whistles code to create a task that just calls the synchronous Read method. Why do we need it then? Why not just use Task.Run with Stream.Read?

This is why I don't understand the need to bloat the libraries by creating the trivial *Async copies of synchronous methods. MS could have even added the syntactic sugar, so that we could write await async Stream.Read instead of await Stream.ReadAsync or Task.Run(Stream.Read).

Now you may ask "Why not make the *Async methods the only ones and remove the synchronous methods?". As I've said earlier, the base code execution mode is synchronous. It's easy to run synchronous method asynchronously, but not the other way.

So, what is the purpose of the *Async methods in .Net Framework given the ability to run any method asynchronously using Task.Run?

P.S. If the non-freezing the UI is so important, why not just run the handlers async by default and prevent any chance of freezing?

The "no threads" argument:

People answering this question seem to imply that the advantage of *Async methods is that they are efficient because they don't create new threads. The problem is that I don't see such behavior. The parallel asynchronous tasks behave just like I thought - a thread is created (or taken from the thread pool) for each parallel task (not all tasks are executed in parallel though).

Here is my test code:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Linq;
using System.Net.Http;
using System.Threading;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace ConsoleApplication32167 {
    class Program {
        static async Task TestAsync() {
            var httpClient = new HttpClient() { Timeout = TimeSpan.FromMinutes(20) };

            var tasks = Enumerable.Range(1, 100).Select((i) =>
                httpClient.GetStringAsync("http://localhost/SlowWebsite/"));

            Console.WriteLine("Threads before completion: " + Process.GetCurrentProcess().Threads.Count);

            await Task.WhenAll(tasks);

            Console.WriteLine("Threads after completion: " + Process.GetCurrentProcess().Threads.Count);
        }

        static void Main(string[] args) {
            Console.WriteLine("Threads at start: " + Process.GetCurrentProcess().Threads.Count);

            var timer = new Stopwatch();
            timer.Start();

            var testTask = TestAsync();

            var distinctThreadIds = new HashSet<int>();
            while (!testTask.IsCompleted) {
                var threadIds = Process.GetCurrentProcess().Threads.OfType<ProcessThread>().Select(thread => thread.Id).ToList();
                distinctThreadIds.UnionWith(threadIds);
                Console.WriteLine("Current thread count: {0}; Cumulative thread count: {1}.", threadIds.Count, distinctThreadIds.Count);
                Thread.Sleep(250);
            }

            testTask.Wait();

            Console.WriteLine(timer.Elapsed);
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}

This code tries to run 100 HttpClient.GetStringAsync tasks making requests to a website that takes 1 minute to respond. At the same time it counts the number of active threads and the cumulative number of different created by the process. As I've predicted, this program creates many new threads. The output looks like this:

Current thread count: 4; Cumulative thread count: 4.
....
Current thread count: 25; Cumulative thread count: 25.
....
Current thread count: 7; Cumulative thread count: 63.
Current thread count: 9; Cumulative thread count: 65.
00:10:01.9981006

This means that:

  • 61 new threads are created during the course of the async task execution.
  • The peak number of new active threads is 21.
  • The execution takes 10x more time (10 minutes instead of 1).This was caused by the local IIS limits.
share|improve this question
1  
You need to understand what non-blocking IO means and why. (eg, Node.js) –  SLaks Feb 11 at 1:08
1  
@Noseratio I've removed the part about the WP7. What I meant by "ugly code" was code like this: stackoverflow.com/a/20260936/1497385 also suggested by Microsoft here: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windowsphone/develop/… –  Ark-kun Feb 11 at 1:31
1  
@Ark-kun, the pool threads are used to handle the completion of the naturally async operation. That's why you may see the pool growing. The IO completion code handler has to be called on some thread, other than the thread currently executing your code. The point is, while the asynchronous operation still is pending ("in flight"), it doesn't occupy and block any threads, so the vacant threads can be used for other useful work. That's especially important for server-side code handling multiple requests. –  Noseratio Feb 11 at 3:26
1  
@Noseratio Am I correct? Basically, you're saying that the only advantage/magic of the *Async methods is that running their payloads does not require having specific corresponding threads in the caller's process. That way I could run 10000 long-running Async methods in parallel using only, say, 10 thread or less. While this would explain the purpose of the Async methods and answer my question, I fail to see this happening. Can you provide some proof of concept code that is able to demonstrate the reduced thread usage while running parallel Async methods? My code showed the opposite. –  Ark-kun Feb 11 at 13:04
1  
@Ark-kun: Here's a more complicated example, but it should prove the question well. Create a simple web application that accepts a request and then delays for, say, a minute, before returning a response. Now run a client application that hits the web application's endpoint using HttpClient.GetStringAsync 100 times. If the method is using the thread pool, you'll either see 100 threads created, or you won't get through all 100 calls for minutes. If not, the calls should all complete immediately, and if you await Task.WhenAll() it should take roughly 1 minute to complete. –  StriplingWarrior Feb 11 at 16:30

2 Answers 2

Marking the methods async means that we can use the await keyword to basically schedule the heavy processing on another thread and free the UI thread until the processing is finished.

That's not at all how async works. See my async intro.

You may say that the *Async methods use some special magic (like handling external signals) that make them more efficient than their synchronous counterparts. The thing is that I don't see this beeing the case.

In pure asynchronous code, there is no thread (as I explain on my blog). In fact, at the device driver level, all (non-trivial) I/O is asynchronous. It is the synchronous APIs (at the OS level) that are an abstraction layer over the natural, asynchronous APIs.

Let's look at the Stream.ReadAsync for example.

Stream is an unusual case. As a base class, it has to prevent breaking changes as much as possible. So, when they added the virtual ReadAsync method, they had to add a default implementation. This implementation has to use a non-ideal implementation (Task.Run), which is unfortunate. In an ideal world, ReadAsync would be (or call) an abstract asynchronous implementation, but that would break every existing implementation of Stream.

For a more proper example, compare the difference between WebClient and HttpClient.

share|improve this answer
1  
@Ark-kun: The main point about "That's all the async keyword does" is that it specifically does not offload operations to a background thread. Regarding "there is no thread", the point is that asynchronous operations do not execute code, hence there is no thread required to run them. E.g., if you do a ReadAsync on a file opened for asynchronous access, then that I/O does not block a thread while the read is being done; it just sets up the transfer buffers, starts the read operation, and returns. Whereas a Read wrapped in Task.Run does block a thread. –  Stephen Cleary Feb 11 at 0:22
1  
>"Stream is an unusual case" Ok. I looked at FileStream. At first it seemed that it just calls the synchronous ReadFile from kernel32.dll msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/aa365467.aspx But then I saw the OVERLAPPED structure. Looks like FileStream.ReadAsync has some magic after all. –  Ark-kun Feb 11 at 0:40
4  
Task.Run and Task.Factory.StartNew both use the thread pool, and if you use them to call a synchronous method, they will block a thread pool thread. Most *Async library methods end up calling TaskFactory.FromAsync or TaskCompletionSource, which do not block a thread pool thread. –  Stephen Cleary Feb 11 at 1:41
1  
Again Stream and friends are unusual. You have to be sure to open the file explicitly for asynchronous access. –  Stephen Cleary Feb 11 at 2:20
1  
But what about HttpClient.GetStringAsync? Ok, I've found the constructor that lets me open the FileStream for async IO (it seems a bit stupid to no use async IO in the explicitly asynchronous method like FileStream.ReadAsync (I'm talking about FileStream, not Stream) ). Now the ThreadPool is not used and the behavior is similar to HttpClient.GetStringAsync. Many new threads are started. I see it in the Task Manager and in the Visual Studio Threads window. –  Ark-kun Feb 11 at 2:34

Let's do the realistic test: naturally asynchronous WebRequest.GetResponseAsync vs unnaturally synchronous WebRequest.GetResponse.

First, we extend the standard limits of the ThreadPool:

ThreadPool.SetMaxThreads(MAX_REQS * 2, MAX_REQS * 2);
ThreadPool.SetMinThreads(MAX_REQS, MAX_REQS);

Note I request the same number of workerThreads and completionPortThreads. Then we'll perform MAX_REQS = 200 parallel requests to bing.com, using each API.

The code (a standalone console app):

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Threading;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
using System.Linq;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Net;

namespace Console_21690385
{
    class Program
    {
        const int MAX_REQS = 200;

        // implement GetStringAsync
        static async Task<string> GetStringAsync(string url)
        {
            using (var response = await WebRequest.Create(url).GetResponseAsync())
            using (var stream = response.GetResponseStream())
            using (var reader = new System.IO.StreamReader(stream))
            {
                return await reader.ReadToEndAsync();
            }
        }

        // test using GetStringAsync
        static async Task TestWithGetStringAsync()
        {
            var tasks = Enumerable.Range(1, MAX_REQS).Select((i) =>
                GetStringAsync("http://www.bing.com/search?q=item1=" + i));

            Console.WriteLine("Threads before completion: " + Process.GetCurrentProcess().Threads.Count);

            await Task.WhenAll(tasks);

            Console.WriteLine("Threads after completion: " + Process.GetCurrentProcess().Threads.Count);
        }

        // implement GetStringSync
        static string GetStringSync(string url)
        {
            using (var response = WebRequest.Create(url).GetResponse())
            using (var stream = response.GetResponseStream())
            using (var reader = new System.IO.StreamReader(stream))
            {
                return reader.ReadToEnd();
            }
        }

        // test using GetStringSync
        static async Task TestWithGetStringSync()
        {
            var tasks = Enumerable.Range(1, MAX_REQS).Select((i) =>
                Task.Factory.StartNew(
                    () => GetStringSync("http://www.bing.com/search?q=item1=" + i),
                    CancellationToken.None, TaskCreationOptions.PreferFairness, TaskScheduler.Default));

            Console.WriteLine("Threads before completion: " + Process.GetCurrentProcess().Threads.Count);

            await Task.WhenAll(tasks);

            Console.WriteLine("Threads after completion: " + Process.GetCurrentProcess().Threads.Count);
        }

        // run either of the tests
        static void RunTest(Func<Task> runTest)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Threads at start: " + Process.GetCurrentProcess().Threads.Count);

            var stopWatch = new Stopwatch();
            stopWatch.Start();

            var testTask = runTest();

            while (!testTask.IsCompleted)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Currently threads: " + Process.GetCurrentProcess().Threads.Count);
                Thread.Sleep(1000);
            }
            Console.WriteLine("Threads at end: " + Process.GetCurrentProcess().Threads.Count + ", time: " + stopWatch.Elapsed);

            testTask.Wait();
        }

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            ThreadPool.SetMaxThreads(MAX_REQS * 2, MAX_REQS * 2);
            ThreadPool.SetMinThreads(MAX_REQS, MAX_REQS);

            Console.WriteLine("Testing using GetStringAsync");
            RunTest(TestWithGetStringAsync);
            Console.ReadLine();

            Console.WriteLine("Testing using GetStringSync");
            RunTest(TestWithGetStringSync);
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}

Output:

Testing using GetStringAsync
Threads at start: 3
Threads before completion: 3
Currently threads: 25
Currently threads: 84
Currently threads: 83
Currently threads: 83
Currently threads: 83
Currently threads: 83
Currently threads: 83
Currently threads: 84
Currently threads: 83
Currently threads: 83
Currently threads: 84
Currently threads: 84
Currently threads: 84
Currently threads: 83
Currently threads: 83
Currently threads: 84
Currently threads: 83
Currently threads: 82
Currently threads: 82
Currently threads: 82
Currently threads: 83
Currently threads: 25
Currently threads: 25
Currently threads: 26
Currently threads: 25
Currently threads: 25
Currently threads: 25
Currently threads: 23
Currently threads: 23
Currently threads: 24
Currently threads: 20
Currently threads: 20
Currently threads: 19
Currently threads: 19
Currently threads: 19
Currently threads: 19
Currently threads: 18
Currently threads: 19
Currently threads: 19
Currently threads: 19
Currently threads: 18
Currently threads: 18
Currently threads: 18
Currently threads: 19
Currently threads: 19
Currently threads: 18
Currently threads: 19
Currently threads: 19
Currently threads: 18
Currently threads: 18
Currently threads: 17
Threads after completion: 17
Threads at end: 17, time: 00:00:51.2605879

Testing using GetStringSync
Threads at start: 15
Threads before completion: 15
Currently threads: 55
Currently threads: 213
Currently threads: 213
Currently threads: 213
Currently threads: 213
Currently threads: 213
Currently threads: 213
Currently threads: 213
Currently threads: 213
Currently threads: 212
Currently threads: 210
Currently threads: 210
Currently threads: 210
Currently threads: 210
Currently threads: 210
Currently threads: 210
Currently threads: 210
Currently threads: 210
Currently threads: 210
Currently threads: 210
Currently threads: 209
Currently threads: 209
Currently threads: 209
Currently threads: 209
Currently threads: 209
Currently threads: 209
Currently threads: 209
Currently threads: 209
Currently threads: 209
Currently threads: 209
Currently threads: 209
Currently threads: 209
Currently threads: 209
Currently threads: 209
Currently threads: 209
Currently threads: 209
Currently threads: 209
Currently threads: 209
Currently threads: 209
Currently threads: 209
Currently threads: 209
Currently threads: 205
Currently threads: 201
Currently threads: 196
Currently threads: 190
Currently threads: 186
Currently threads: 182
Threads after completion: 178
Threads at end: 173, time: 00:00:47.2603652

The result:

Both tests takes about 50 seconds to complete, but GetStringAsync peaks at 83 threads, while GetStringSync does at 213. The higher the MAX_REQS figure goes, the more threads are wasted by the blocking WebRequest.GetResponse API.

@Ark-kun, I hope you see the point now.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, this is perfectly consistent with my results. I.e. Through the run, +61 new threads were summarily started - up to +21 of them active at the same time.. Thanks for independently validating the number. So, what are you trying to say with this number? –  Ark-kun Feb 12 at 2:46
    
I focused on the other aspects: First, 61 different new threads for 100 tasks defeats the "thread economy" argument. Second, 10x slowdown defeats the "optimization/efficiency" argument. –  Ark-kun Feb 12 at 2:49
    
I've updated my code using your code + cumulative thread counting. But that's not all. You need a slow operation (slow website) to really see the problem. I've set up a website like that locally. –  Ark-kun Feb 12 at 3:14
    
Ok. 10x slowdown is caused by IIS (10 concurrent connections on a client machine). I'll remove part about the slowdown from the question. But the fact that 60 new threads may be created for 100 tasks is still there. –  Ark-kun Feb 12 at 3:58
    
Right now my vision is like this (well it was like that since the beginning): *Async Tasks still use some sort of thread pool. When there is some code that needs executed, the pool grows (new threads are created). When the pool idles, it shrinks (threads are terminated). That's OK by me - I'm not a "no threads" purist. Shrinking and growing the pool causes the cumulative thread count to grow. –  Ark-kun Feb 12 at 4:34

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