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I'm trying to modify a table to make it's primary key column AUTO_INCREMENT after the fact. I have tried the following sql, but got a syntax error:

ALTER TABLE document
ALTER COLUMN document_id AUTO_INCREMENT

Am I doing something wrong or is this not possible?

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6 Answers

up vote 91 down vote accepted
ALTER TABLE document MODIFY COLUMN document_id INT auto_increment
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Thanks, that was perfect. –  C. Ross Jan 30 '10 at 19:22
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I'm curious why you would suggest INT(4). Any particular reason? –  Steven Oxley Jan 30 '10 at 19:34
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@Steven Oxley because I declared my table that way. –  C. Ross Jan 30 '10 at 19:48
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Specifying a number between parenthesis does exactly nothing (well ok, almost nothing) for MySQL integer types. The only thing that may be influenced by the number is the display width, and it is up to the client to do that. But don't be deceived and think that it works like it does for VARCHAR and DECIMAL types - in those cases, the amount of data you can store in there is actually specified, whereas a particular flavour of INT is always allows storage of the exact same range of values –  Roland Bouman Jan 30 '10 at 20:03
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Yeah, what Roland said. –  Steven Oxley Jan 31 '10 at 0:13
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Roman is right, but note that the auto_increment column must be part of the PRIMARY KEY or a UNIQUE KEY (and in almost 100% of the cases, it should be the only column that makes up the PRIMARY KEY):

ALTER TABLE document MODIFY document_id INT AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY
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+1. Primary key required if not defined at the time of table creation. –  daa Apr 13 '12 at 9:07
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You must specify the type of the column before the auto_increment directive, i.e. ALTER TABLE document ALTER COLUMN document_id INT AUTO_INCREMENT.

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AUTO_INCREMENT is part of the column's datatype, you have to define the complete datatype for the column again:

ALTER TABLE document
ALTER COLUMN document_id int AUTO_INCREMENT

(int taken as an example, you should set it to the type the column had before)

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The SQL to do this would be:

ALTER TABLE `document` MODIFY COLUMN `document_id` INT AUTO_INCREMENT;

There are a couple of reasons that your SQL might not work. First, you must re-specify the data type (INT in this case). Also, the column you are trying to alter must be indexed (it does not have to be the primary key, but usually that is what you would want). Furthermore, there can only be one AUTO_INCREMENT column for each table. So, you may wish to run the following SQL (if your column is not indexed):

ALTER TABLE `document` MODIFY `document_id` INT AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY;

You can find more information in the MySQL documentation: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/alter-table.html for the modify column syntax and http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/create-table.html for more information about specifying columns.

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use this query:

Alter table table_name modify column_name datatype(length) AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY

For more details visit: add auto increment

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