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I am trying to test the accuracy of the Euler's primality test. I wrote a function euler() that takes in a numeric and tests all numbers for primality up to the input and outputs them to the console including the nonprimes. Here is how it looks:

euler(10)
[1] 1
[1] 2
[1] 3
[1] "Not prime:" "4"         
[1] 5
[1] "Not prime:" "6"         
[1] 7
[1] "Not prime:" "8"         
[1] "Not prime:" "9"         
[1] "Not prime:" "10"        
> 

I am trying to take this output and put it into a data frame or a factor or a list. I tried x<-euler(10), but it did not work. I just get a NULL vector. Here is the code of my euler function:

## Euler's primality test

euler <- function(k) {
  for(i in 1:k) {
    a  <- 2;
    if((a^i-a) %% i == 0) {
      print(i)
    } else{print(c("Not prime:",i))}
  }   
}

I tried defining a data frame outside the "for" loop and then use rbind(), but I do not know how to do it when there is an if statement. Any help appreciated. If I was unclear let me know and I will make the necessary edits.

share|improve this question
    
The function is badly implemented. It should return the result, not print it directly. You can capture this output but it’s not the appropriate solution here. The appropriate solution is to rewrite euler to not print the result (this is ignoring that the function contains semantic errors as well: this is not a proper implementation of Euler’s primality test). –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 11 at 0:54
    
@KonradRudolph yeah I know it is not. The point here is for me to learn how to take the output and put it into a data frame for example. By the way, do you know of any good paper that discusses Euler's primality test or at least a link with explanation? Sorry with al those requests. –  Koba Feb 11 at 1:07
1  
For an explanation, the Wikipedia article is actually not bad. –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 11 at 9:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It is recommended that a function return something instead of printing it. (And you are still free to print the output after calling the function if that's what you want.)

It is also recommended that the output of a function be consistent, e.g. do not return a number in one case, or a string "Not prime" in another. Here, returning a boolean (TRUE or FALSE for prime or not) is what makes most sense.

It is also recommended (beneficial) to vectorize functions when you can. So you could call the function using a vector like 1:10 and it will quickly return a vector of ten booleans.

Taking all that into account, I would define the function as follows:

is.euler.prime <- function(k) (2^k-2) %% k == 0

Then you can do things like:

is.euler.prime(10)
is.euler.prime(1:10)
which(is.euler.prime(1:10))
data.frame(x = 1:10, euler.prime = is.euler.prime(1:10))
share|improve this answer
    
Looks like I got downvoted, maybe for a good reason. I'd appreciate constructive feedback. –  flodel Feb 11 at 2:52
    
Cool. Thanks. I do not think anybody downvoted you. –  Koba Feb 11 at 5:59
euler <- function(k) {
  L <- c()
  for(i in 1:k) {
    a  <- 2;
    if((a^i-a) %% i == 0) {
      L <- c(L,i)
    } 
    else{
      L <- c(L,paste("Not prime:",i))
    }
  }
  return(L)
}
share|improve this answer
    
I was not going to comment but since this was accepted as an answer, let's point out that 1) growing a vector is extremely inefficient so this won't work with large values of k, 2) the output type is inconsistent, e.g. compare class(euler(3)) and class(euler(4)), 3) using a for loop isn't great nor efficient when you can easily vectorize 4) this answer did not even have an explanation to go with the code... –  flodel Feb 11 at 12:33

Considerations about the "properness" of your function apart, you can capture the print output of a function with capture.output.

In your case:

data<-capture.output(euler(10))

This will give you:

 [1] "[1] 1"                             "[1] 2"                             "[1] 3"                             "[1] \"Not prime:\" \"4\"         "
 [5] "[1] 5"                             "[1] \"Not prime:\" \"6\"         " "[1] 7"                             "[1] \"Not prime:\" \"8\"         "
 [9] "[1] \"Not prime:\" \"9\"         " "[1] \"Not prime:\" \"10\"        "

If you want, you can print it in a pretty way with cat:

cat(data,sep="\n")

That will give you back the result:

[1] 1
[1] 2
[1] 3
[1] "Not prime:" "4"         
[1] 5
[1] "Not prime:" "6"         
[1] 7
[1] "Not prime:" "8"         
[1] "Not prime:" "9"         
[1] "Not prime:" "10" 

If you want to save the results without the line breaks and the [1]'s, you can use gsub to clean the data:

data<- gsub("\\[1\\]\\s|[[:punct:]]|\\s*$", "", capture.output(euler(10)))

This will give you a vector with "clean" character strings like this:

data
[1] "1"            "2"            "3"            "Not prime 4"  "5"            "Not prime 6"  "7"            "Not prime 8"  "Not prime 9"  "Not prime 10"

But I am answering on the assumption that you want to learn how to capture print outputs and that this euler function is a toy function to test that.

If that is not your intention (and now that I have read again your comments I think that it was not), you should really rethink your function and read carefully @flodel's answer.

share|improve this answer
    
Cool method. It is a toy function. I was trying to learn to capture output so I can analyze it. –  Koba Feb 11 at 5:21

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