Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So apparently because of the recent scams, the developer tools is exploited by people to post spam and even used to "hack" accounts. Facebook has blocked the developer tools, and I can't even use the console.

Enter image description here

How did they do that?? One Stack Overflow post claimed that it is not possible, but Facebook has proven them wrong.

Just go to Facebook and open up the developer tools, type one character into the console, and this warning pops up. No matter what you put in, it will not get executed.

How is this possible?

They even blocked auto-complete in the console:

Enter image description here

share|improve this question
163  
Doesn't happen to me in chrome –  zerkms Feb 11 at 3:44
35  
Well, it doesn't happen to me. Console works as expected. –  zerkms Feb 11 at 3:55
372  
I assume this is a scam, and if I follow your instructions you'll gain access to my account. –  djechlin Feb 11 at 17:37
20  
Also, mdn does something a lot cooler with the dragon :D –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Feb 11 at 21:58
14  
Did you even check the link Facebook gives : facebook.com/selfxss ? –  JochemQuery Feb 13 at 11:14
show 6 more comments

6 Answers

up vote 1490 down vote accepted
+50

I'm a security engineer at Facebook and this is my fault. We're testing this for some users to see if it can slow down some attacks where users are tricked into pasting (malicious) JavaScript code into the browser console.

Just to be clear: trying to block hackers client-side is a bad idea in general; this is to protect against a specific social engineering attack.

If you ended up in the test group and are annoyed by this, sorry. I tried to make the opt-out page as simple as possible while still being scary enough to stop at least some of the victims.

The actual code is pretty similar to @joeldixon66's link; ours is a little more complicated for no good reason.

Chrome wraps all console code in

with ((console && console._commandLineAPI) || {}) {
  <code goes here>
}

... so the site redefines console._commandLineAPI to throw:

Object.defineProperty(console, '_commandLineAPI',
   { get : function() { throw 'Nooo!' } })

This is not quite enough (try it!), but that's the main trick.

share|improve this answer
24  
Okay I did get past level 3. –  Derek 朕會功夫 Feb 11 at 6:07
23  
Could the attacker just redefine the _commandLineAPI back to the original code? –  rupert0 Feb 11 at 19:11
14  
rupert0, try it! @gorex, there was a bit of a race there -- can you try it again? (you may need to, ehem, turn it off and on again...) –  Alf Feb 11 at 19:13
8  
Sooo is this a Chrome-only hack? Firebug wouldn't be affected? –  Izkata Feb 11 at 22:49
19  
And one more thing; is there a way to opt-in? :) –  Boris Samardžija Feb 12 at 8:58
show 26 more comments

Besides redefining console._commandLineAPI, there are some other ways to break into InjectedScriptHost on webkit browsers, to prevent or alter the evaluation of expressions entered into the developers console.

One of it is hooking into Function.prototype.call

Chrome evaluates the entered expression by calling its eval function with InjectedScriptHost as thisArg

var result = evalFunction.call(object, expression);

Given this, you can listen for the thisArg of call being evaluate and get a reference to the first argument (InjectedScriptHost)

if (window.webkitURL) {
    var ish, _call = Function.prototype.call;
    Function.prototype.call = function () { //Could be wrapped in a setter for _commandLineAPI, to redefine only when the user started typing.
        if (arguments.length > 0 && this.name === "evaluate" && arguments [0].constructor.name === "InjectedScriptHost") { //If thisArg is the evaluate function and the arg0 is the ISH
            ish = arguments[0];
            ish.evaluate = function (e) { //Redefine the evaluation behaviour
                throw new Error ('Rejected evaluation of: \n\'' + e.split ('\n').slice(1,-1).join ("\n") + '\'');
            };
            Function.prototype.call = _call; //Reset the Function.prototype.call
            return _call.apply(this, arguments);  
        }
    };
}

You could e.g. throw an error, that the evaluation was rejected.

enter image description here

Here is an example where the entered expression gets passed to a CoffeScript compiler before passing it to the evaluate function.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Netflix also implements this feature

(function() {
    try {
        var $_console$$ = console;
        Object.defineProperty(window, "console", {
            get: function() {
                if ($_console$$._commandLineAPI)
                    throw "Sorry, for security reasons, the script console is deactivated on netflix.com";
                return $_console$$
            },
            set: function($val$$) {
                $_console$$ = $val$$
            }
        })
    } catch ($ignore$$) {
    }
})();

They just override console._commandLineAPI to throw security error.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I couldn't get it to trigger that on any page. A more robust version of this would do it:

window.console.log = function(){
    console.error('The developer console is temp...');
    window.console.log = function() {
        return false;
    }
}

console.log('test');

To style the output: Colors in JavaScript console

Edit Thinking @joeldixon66 has the right idea: Disable JavaScript execution from console « ::: KSpace :::

share|improve this answer
5  
Even though your answer is not complete, I like that you provided a link that describes how to style the output. –  doque Feb 12 at 8:04
add comment

I located the Facebook's console buster script using Chrome developer tools. Here is the script with minor changes for readability. I have removed the bits that I could not understand:

Object.defineProperty(window, "console", {
    value: console,
    writable: false,
    configurable: false
});

var i = 0;
function showWarningAndThrow() {
    if (!i) {
        setTimeout(function () {
            console.log("%cWarning message", "font: 2em sans-serif; color: yellow; background-color: red;");
        }, 1);
        i = 1;
    }
    throw "Console is disabled";
}

var l, n = {
        set: function (o) {
            l = o;
        },
        get: function () {
            showWarningAndThrow();
            return l;
        }
    };
Object.defineProperty(console, "_commandLineAPI", n);
Object.defineProperty(console, "__commandLineAPI", n);

With this, the console auto-complete fails silently while statements typed in console will fail to execute (the exception will be logged).

References:

share|improve this answer
2  
You could also throw SyntaxError('Unexpected token ILLEGAL'), just to make it more interesting. –  Blender Feb 15 at 8:50
add comment

It works fine for me in Chrome - but Facebook do seem to be trying to disable the JavaScript console to prevent a recent scam.

Fortunately, they provide an option to turn this protection off - https://www.facebook.com/selfxss

Edit: As per my comment - something like this could prevent JavaScript execution from the console.

share|improve this answer
15  
The question is "how". –  Derek 朕會功夫 Feb 11 at 3:52
14  
Possibly something like this –  joeldixon66 Feb 11 at 4:00
3  
As you mentioned it works in Chrome, did anybody try with Firefox? –  Gokhan Arik Feb 12 at 5:22
1  
@Prix: I rolled back your edit. It isn't okay to copy content just because you attribute the source, unless it's been licensed to allow copying. (A URL would not be complete attribution, anyway, you would need to include the author's name.) This content has been licensed with Creative Commons's Non-Commercial clause. This is incompatible with Stack Overflow's CC license, which excludes that clause, and Stack Overflow itself would probably be considered an illegal commercial use. –  Jeremy Banks Feb 12 at 22:21
    
Anybody who is dumb enough to think they are clever enough to bypass facebook security by doing some console hijinks is getting what they deserve! –  Facebook Answers Feb 16 at 16:30
show 2 more comments

protected by Charles Feb 12 at 8:20

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.