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Let's say I have a function getQ(x) which returns some number and it is pretty slow. Now, if I do this:

x = 10
x = getQ(x) if getQ(x) >= 0 else 0

does getQ get executed twice in such case?

Is this:

x = getQ(x)
x = x if x >= 0 else 0

quicker?

If so, is there a more elegant one-liner for such a situation?

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3  
You could try it by adding a print statement inside the function getQ() –  Christian Feb 11 at 6:23
    
@Christian Ha, yep, good idea, now I know, thanks :) –  sashkello Feb 11 at 6:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Yes, getQ would be called twice if the result is nonnegative, so the second would definitely be quicker in that case.

In this particular case, you could write x = max(getQ(x), 0). The "general" solution you're looking for is something like

x = (lambda x: x if x >= 0 else 0)(getQ(x))

I wouldn't recommend using this in real code, but it lets you bind a name while still keeping it one expression.

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Heh, if that would be only max I needed. Nice idea anyway, I thought maybe there is some expansion of it with using lambda-function, but can't quite come up with it... Maybe there is none. I'm just having a few of those things in my code and these flattened if-else's don't look readable to me - I just want to have this kind of default value function would collapse to in case if the result is not what I want... assuming I don't want to touch the function itself. –  sashkello Feb 11 at 6:40
1  
Well, I suppose you could write something like x = (lambda x: x if x >= 0 else 0)(getQ(x)). I wouldn't like to see code like this in real life though :s –  Ismail Badawi Feb 11 at 6:43
    
Yes, that's exactly what I meant. Can you please add it to your answer - I know this is not very pretty at all, but would be the actual answer to the question, nevertheless. –  sashkello Feb 11 at 6:47
    
Actually, it is not that ugly because it merely collapses those two lines of code I have to one. You immediately know it is applied to getQ(x) and doesn't use any intermediate steps. I kind of like it, lucky for you, you aren't going to read my code :) –  sashkello Feb 11 at 6:50
    
@sashkello Okay, I added it –  Ismail Badawi Feb 11 at 15:52

You could use the dis module and clearly see that the function would be called twice in first case.

def fun1():
    ...:     x = sqrt(10) if sqrt(10)>=0 else 0
    ...:     

dis.dis(fun1)
  2           0 LOAD_GLOBAL              0 (sqrt) 
              3 LOAD_CONST               1 (10) 
              6 CALL_FUNCTION            1 (1 positional, 0 keyword pair)  // First Call
              9 LOAD_CONST               2 (0) 
             12 COMPARE_OP               5 (>=) 
             15 POP_JUMP_IF_FALSE       30 
             18 LOAD_GLOBAL              0 (sqrt) 
             21 LOAD_CONST               1 (10) 
             24 CALL_FUNCTION            1 (1 positional, 0 keyword pair) // Second Call
             27 JUMP_FORWARD             3 (to 33) 
        >>   30 LOAD_CONST               2 (0) 
        >>   33 STORE_FAST               0 (x) 
             36 LOAD_CONST               0 (None) 
             39 RETURN_VALUE         



def fun2():
    x = sqrt(10)
    x = x if x>=10 else 0



dis.dis(fun2)
  2           0 LOAD_GLOBAL              0 (sqrt) 
              3 LOAD_CONST               1 (10) 
              6 CALL_FUNCTION            1 (1 positional, 0 keyword pair) // Single call
              9 STORE_FAST               0 (x) 

  3          12 LOAD_FAST                0 (x) 
             15 LOAD_CONST               1 (10) 
             18 COMPARE_OP               5 (>=) 
             21 POP_JUMP_IF_FALSE       30 
             24 LOAD_FAST                0 (x) 
             27 JUMP_FORWARD             3 (to 33) 
        >>   30 LOAD_CONST               2 (0) 
        >>   33 STORE_FAST               0 (x) 
             36 LOAD_CONST               0 (None) 
             39 RETURN_VALUE         
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