Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am trying to do this lesson and I am clearly missing something glaringly obvious!

require "rpn_calculator"

describe RPNCalculator do

  attr_accessor :calculator

  before do
    @calculator = RPNCalculator.new
  end

  it "adds two numbers" do
    calculator.push(2)
    calculator.push(3)
    calculator.plus
    calculator.value.should == 5
  end

  ...

  # extra credit
  it "evaluates a string" do
    calculator.evaluate("1 2 3 * +").should ==
      ((2 * 3) + 1)

  ...

  end

end

Everything is working to my novice eyes except @numbers. setting @numbers from the evaluate method doesn't affect @numbers in other methods and I really don't understand why. I've tried everything I could google including changing @numbers to @@numbers but nothing seems to help. I could just evaluate the string in the evaluate method... but I already have such a nice plus method that I can use!

class RPNCalculator
  attr_accessor :numbers

  def initialize
    @numbers = []
  end  

  def push(n)
    @numbers.push(n)  
  end

  def plus
    @numbers.length > 1 ? @numbers.push(@numbers.pop(2).reduce(:+) ) : fail
  end

  def minus
    @numbers.length > 1 ? @numbers.push(@numbers.pop(2).reduce(:-) ) : fail
  end  

  def divide
    @numbers.length > 1 ? @numbers.push(@numbers.pop(2).inject{|x,y| x.to_f / y} ) : fail
  end

  def times
    @numbers.length > 1 ? @numbers.push(@numbers.pop(2).reduce(:*) ) : fail
  end

  def value
    @value = @numbers[-1]
  end

  def tokens(pol)
    pol.split(' ').map{|n| n.to_i.to_s == n ? n.to_i : n.to_sym}
  end

  def evaluate(pol)
    order = []
    opps = {:+ => plus, :- => minus, :/ => divide, :* => times }
    tokens(pol).reverse.chunk{|n| n.is_a?(Integer)}.each{|e,a| e == true ? a.reverse.each{|a| push(a) } : a.each {|a| order.push(a) }}
    order.reverse.each {|o| (opps[o]) }
  end

  def fail
    begin
      raise Exception.new("calculator is empty")
    end
  end

end

The result is the plus returns fail because @numbers is empty....

RPNCalculator
  adds two numbers
  adds three numbers
  subtracts the second number from the first number
  adds and subtracts
  multiplies and divides
  resolves operator precedence unambiguously
  fails informatively when there's not enough values stacked away
  tokenizes a string
  evaluates a string (FAILED - 1)

Failures:

  1) RPNCalculator evaluates a string
     Failure/Error: calculator.evaluate("1 2 3 * +").should ==
     Exception:
       calculator is empty
     # ./12_rpn_calculator/rpn_calculator.rb:59:in `fail'
     # ./12_rpn_calculator/rpn_calculator.rb:14:in `plus'
     # ./12_rpn_calculator/rpn_calculator.rb:39:in `evaluate'
     # ./12_rpn_calculator/rpn_calculator_spec.rb:134:in `block (2 levels) in '

Thanks to Frank Schmitt I got it working. Apparently one does not simply store methods in hashes.

Correct evaluate method:

  def evaluate(pol)
    @numbers = [] # because this does 4 tests without clearing @numbers
    opps = {:+ => Proc.new {plus}, :- => Proc.new{minus}, :/ => Proc.new{divide}, :* => Proc.new{times} } # method in proc, thank you Frank :D
    tokens(pol).chunk{|n| n.is_a?(Integer)}.each{|e,a| e == true ? a.each{|a| push(a) } : a.each {|o| (opps[o].call) }}
    @numbers[0]
  end

share|improve this question
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Apparently, Ruby calls the methods as soon as you store them inside your opps hash. To fix this, you can use this modified version of your code:

  def evaluate(pol)
    order = []
    opps = {:+ => Proc.new {plus}, :- => Proc.new{minus}, :/ => Proc.new{divide}, :* => Proc.new{times} }
    tokens(pol).reverse.chunk{|n| n.is_a?(Integer)}.each{|e,a| e == true ? a.reverse.each{|a| push(a) } : a.each {|a| or
der.push(a) }}
    order.reverse.each {|o| (opps[o].call) }
  end

This version

  • stores Procs inside the opps hash that simply call your methods
  • uses Proc.call to actually call your methods
share|improve this answer
1  
Man, my brains were boggling left and right! Thank you so much - that was exactly the problem! It might not have been the intended lesson but this is definitely my biggest breakthrough today! – adamrabbit Feb 11 '14 at 13:48
    
You're welcome :-) Please consider accepting my answer, if it solved your problem. – Frank Schmitt Feb 11 '14 at 13:53
1  
oops, sorry... I only just realised that the checkmark meant that! – adamrabbit Feb 11 '14 at 14:12
    
No problem :-) .... – Frank Schmitt Feb 11 '14 at 14:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.