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I have a recipients query containing two recipients with the ID 1 and 2: I loop over each one to build json output:

    data = []
    this_tem = {}

    for item in recipients:
        this_tem['recipient_id'] = item.pk
        data.append(this_tem)

    return HttpResponse(json.dumps(data), mimetype='application/json')

This gives me:

[
    {
        "recipient_id": 2,
    },
    {
        "recipient_id": 2,
    }
]

As you can see it should be recipient_id 1 and recipient_id 2 however, my loop overwrites the value, why?

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1  
change to data.append( {'recepient_id': item.pk } ).. no need for this_tem.. or define this_tem inside the loop –  Crazyshezy Feb 11 at 13:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

this_tem is a reference to a single object (a dict) which you repeatedly modify and append in your loop. You overwrite the value of that key in the loop.

You need to create a new dict each iteration:

data = []

for item in recipients:
    this_tem = {}
    this_tem['recipient_id'] = item.pk
    data.append(this_tem)

Edit
As Grijesh Chauhan graciously pointed out, the expression and loop can be simplified vis a vie a list comprehension:

data = [{'recipient_id': item.pk} for item in recipients]
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wow fast response! I see. –  Sputnik Feb 11 at 13:04
2  
or just data.append({'recipient_id': item.pk}) or use LC –  Grijesh Chauhan Feb 11 at 13:06
1  
@GrijeshChauhan, why not both!? ^_^ –  StoryTeller Feb 11 at 13:10

You're appending a dictionary, which is a mutable object.

So after your loop, data contains two references to the same dictionary. You'll have to append new dictionaries in each iteration, e.g. like this:

for item in recipients:
    data.append(dict(recipient_id = item.pk))
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which is better dict( or data.append(this_tem)? –  Sputnik Feb 11 at 13:05
1  
With the current dict (having only one key), i prefer the append(dict(..)) version - simply because it avoids the need for another variable and saves one or two lines of code. But it's basically a matter of taste I'd say. –  sebastian Feb 11 at 13:07

This is because this_tem is declared outside for loop

data = []
for item in recipients:
    this_tem = {}
    this_tem['recipient_id'] = item.pk
    data.append(this_tem)

return HttpResponse(json.dumps(data), mimetype='application/json')
share|improve this answer
2  
Declaring outside is not the actual reason why this happens. Please check the other answers. –  thefourtheye Feb 11 at 13:04
1  
when declaring this_tem outside the loop, it is being modified and append in the loop –  Sar009 Feb 11 at 13:10

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