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I found some good cons here:

  • The noscript tag only detects whether the browser has JavaScript enabled or not. If JavaScript is disabled in the Firewall rather than in the browser then the JavaScript will not run and the content of the noscript tag will not be displayed.

  • Many JavaScripts are dependent on a specific feature or features of the language being supported in order for them to be able to run (for example document.getElementById). Where the required features are not supported the JavaScript is unable to run but since JavaScript itself is supported the noscript content will not be displayed.

  • The most useful place to use the noscript tag is in the head of the page where it would be able to selectively determine what stylesheet and meta tags get applied to the page as the page is loading rather than having to wait until the page is loaded. Unfortunately the noscript tag is only valid within the body of the page and so cannot be used in the head.

  • The noscript tag is a block level element and therefore can only be used to display entire blocks of content when JavaScript is disabled. It cannot be used inline.

  • Ideally, web pages should use HTML for the content, CSS for the appearance, and JavaScript for the behaviour. Using the noscript tag is applying a behaviour from within the HTML rather than applying it from JavaScript.

Source: http://javascript.about.com/od/reference/a/noscriptnomore.htm

I very much agree on last point. Is there a way to make and add an external <noscript> file? Should we place <noscript> in the <head>?

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2  
Are there still Firewalls that disable javascript? I was behind one about 13 years ago, and it was awful even back then. My guess is that such a policy would not be possible these days, because about a third of the web would no longer be usable –  Sean Patrick Floyd Nov 13 '10 at 21:19
2  
<noscript> is allowed in the head according to the most recent spec, and in practice is supported almost everywhere developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/HTML/Element/noscript. Also the noscript tag can be styled by CSS to make it inline, just like any block level element can be styled to change its display to inline –  DMTintner Jan 7 '14 at 10:18
1  
noscript tag can be very well be used in head section of the page. –  Diablo Geto Feb 3 '14 at 10:10

7 Answers 7

up vote 20 down vote accepted

It's better to have the default be non-javascript, and then let a javascript code overwrite with a javascript enabled page. Doesn't have to be much. Can just be a display:none; block, which is then set to display:block; by javascript, and vice versa for the non-js page.

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it's a good idea –  Jitendra Vyas Jan 31 '10 at 4:04
5  
A display:block "your browser appears not to support JavaScript" which is set to display:none by Javascript is a viable alternative to NOSCRIPT, but you're losing the semantic information (robots don't know what you are talking about). –  Konerak Nov 13 '10 at 21:07
    
@Konerak true, but you could add a meta-tag for the robots, I guess –  Sean Patrick Floyd Nov 13 '10 at 21:16
    
@Konerak yes, but what I mean is, you have a bunch of divs that are visible before your JS has removed them (for then to display them later at certain events). Whether or not the crawler sees them is irrelevant then, because they are part of the content, just not always visible for JS users. –  Tor Valamo Nov 13 '10 at 23:23
1  
To be sure this approach does not cause a flash of the non-javascript version when javascript is enabled, see stackoverflow.com/questions/3221561/… for how to avoid the flash. (Uses javascript in head tag to hide HTML tag, because that tag exists BEFORE the body is read. Then show again when document is ready.) –  ToolmakerSteve Aug 12 '14 at 2:13

I recommend you not to use <noscript> , you can use the following code:

<HTML>
<head>
<script>
     window.location="some-page.php";
</script>
</head>
<body>
<p>
    Please active JavaScript .
</p>
</body>
</HTML>

if under any circumstance JS is not enabled , the message will be displayed otherwise user is redirected to the destination page .

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1  
I recommend you no to use <noscript> , you can use the following code . <HTML> <head> <script> window.location="some-page.php"; </script> </head> <body> <p> Please active JavaScript . </p> </body> </HTML> if under any circumstance JS is not enabled , the message will be displayed otherwise user is redirected to the destination page . –  mohammad Nov 13 '10 at 20:57
    
I recommend you no to use <noscript> , you can use the following code . "<HTML> <head> <script> window.location="some-page.php"; </script> </head> <body> <p> Please active JavaScript . </p> </body> </HTML>" if under any circumstance JS is not enabled , the message will be displayed otherwise user is redirected to the destination page . –  mohammad Nov 13 '10 at 20:57
    
Fixed the formatting - just select the code and press the code button on the tool bar (or indent it with 4 spaces). –  Rich Bradshaw Nov 13 '10 at 21:12

I create a full height, full width, position:fixed div in all pages with some id .

<div id='noscript_div' style='position:fixed;z-index:20000000;height:100%;width:100%;line-height:100%;'>enable JS buddy</div>
$('#noscript_div').hide();
$(document).ready(function(event){




});

I am not an expert . This worked for me . I am sorry but, this case will suit only if you want the user to have his javascript enabled always

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$('#noscript_div').hide(); will not fire if jquery fails somehow –  mowgli Jul 29 '14 at 11:57

"Using the noscript tag is applying a behaviour from within the HTML rather than applying it from JavaScript."

Anything that can be displayed using only HTML and CSS should be displayed using only HTML and CSS. JavaScript slows down a webpage loading as much as 100 times! Try loading any wikipedia page with javascript on and then with it off. You don't want to make people wait for up to 10 seconds just to read a few lines of text. JavaScript should not be used for that.

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4  
If your site takes ten seconds to load some text, you are simply doing something wrong, no matter what technologies you are using. It certainly isn't Javascript's fault as many sites implement heavy Javascript behavior without this problem. –  Ingo Bürk Jul 31 '13 at 21:14

Although Tor Valamo has an elegant answer to this problem, there is an issue which may cause you to opt out of using this technique.

The problem is (usually) IE. It has the tendency to load and execute the JS a bit slower than other browsers causing it to sometimes flash the "Please Enable Your Javascript" div for a split second before it then loads the JS and hides the div.

It is annoying and to get around this you can implement the "classic". <noscript> redirect approach.

<head>
<noscript><meta http-equiv="refresh" content="0; URL=/NO_SCRIPT_URL/ROUTE_HERE"/></noscript>
</head>

This is the most solid technique that I've come across with regards to this little nasty.

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As long as you redirect to a page that still provides the same functionality and information in other ways. Otherwise, this is really, really annoying. –  user4815162342 Feb 16 '12 at 17:51
    
See stackoverflow.com/questions/3221561/… for how to avoid the flash. (Uses javascript in head tag to hide HTML tag, because that tag exists BEFORE the body is read. Then show again when document is ready.) –  ToolmakerSteve Aug 12 '14 at 2:12

One useful application for noscript that I've seen is for a progressively-enhanced async loading of heavy content (especially "below the fold"). Big images, iframes, etc. can be wrapped in noscript in the HTML source, and then the unwrapped elements can be appended to the page using JavaScript after the DOM is ready. This unblocks the page and can make for a much quicker initial loading experience, especially if your interface relies on JS/JQ interactions applied after the document is ready (2 seconds vs. 6 seconds for a portfolio page I consulted on).

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After pondering for many days and changing my code back and forth, I think I have clearer picture now and would like to share my two cents worth on the subject before I forget.

<div id='noscript'>show non-js content</div>
<script>document.getElementById('noscript').style.display='none';</script>
<script id='required script'>show js content</script>

vs

<noscript>show non-js content</noscript>
<script id='required script'>//show js content</script>

Depending on the situation, there are three cases for consideration:

Case 1 - If required script is inline

Javascript disabled

  • Content in <noscript> tag appears immediately, non-js content is shown
  • Content in <div> tag appears immediately, non-js content is shown

Javascript enabled

  • Content in <noscript> tag does not appear at all, js content shown
  • Content in <div> tag may momentarily appear before being hidden, js content shown

For this case, using <noscript> tag is advantageous.

Case 2 - If required script is from external (third-party) source, but hiding of <div> tag is done with inline script

Javascript disabled

  • Content in <noscript> tag appears immediately, non-js content is shown
  • Content in <div> tag appears immediately, non-js content is shown

Javascript enabled but required script is blocked

  • Content in <noscript> tag does not appear at all, nothing is shown!
  • Content in <div> tag may momentarily appear before being hidden, nothing is shown!

Javascript enabled and required script is received

  • Content in <noscript> tag does not appear at all, js content shown
  • Content in <div> tag may momentarily appear before being hidden, js content shown

For this case, using <noscript> tag is advantageous.

Case 3 - If required script hides the <div> tag

Javascript disabled

  • Content in <noscript> tag appears immediately, non-js content is shown
  • Content in <div> tag appears immediately, non-js content is shown

Javascript enabled but required script is blocked

  • Content in <noscript> tag does not appear at all, nothing is shown!
  • Content in <div> tag appears, non-js content is shown

Javascript enabled and required script is received

  • Content in <noscript> tag does not appear at all, js content shown
  • Content in <div> tag may momentarily appear before being hidden, js content shown

For this case, using <div> tag is advantageous.

In summary

Use <noscript> tag if rendering of the HTML content depends on third-party javascripts or if the required script is inline. Else, use <div> tag and make sure that the required script contains:

document.getElementById('noscript').style.display='none';
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