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I'm working through Python for Data Analysis, and I'm having problems with part of the Ch. 9 (Data Aggregation and Group Operations) section on "Grouping with Functions."

Specifically, if I use the GroupBy object methods or, e.g., Numpy-defined functions, everything works fine. In particular, it ignores columns with strings and only operates on the (appropriate) numeric columns. However, if I try to define my own function to calculate some numeric output, it does not ignore the columns with strings, and it returns an Attribute Error.

Here's the example I'm having trouble with:

df = DataFrame({'data1':np.random.randn(5),
                'data2':np.random.randn(5),
                'key1':['a','a','b','b','a'],
                'key2':['one','two','one','two','one']})

It works fine if I type either of these (I have numpy imported as np):

df.groupby('key1').mean()

or

grouped = df.groupby('key1')

grouped.agg(np.mean())

But if I try these, I get errors ('peak_to_peak' is from the book):

def peak_to_peak(arr):
    return arr.max() - arr.min()

grouped.agg(peak_to_peak)

grouped.agg(lambda x: np.mean(x))

Trying 'peak_to_peak' gives me a big, long error that ends with:

TypeError: unsupported operand type(s) for -: 'str' and 'str'

Trying the lambda function with np.mean() gives me a big long error that ends with:

TypeError: Could not convert onetwoone to numeric

Trying other user-defined functions produces similar errors. In all these cases, it's pretty clearly trying to apply peak_to_peak() or np.mean() (or whatever) to the (subsets of the) 'key2' column from df, whereas for the built-in methods and predefined functions, it (correctly) ignores the 'key2' column subsets.

Any insights would be appreciated.

Update: It turns out if I pass 'peak_to_peak' or the lambda function as lists (e.g., grouped.agg([peak_to_peak])), it works fine. Note that this is not how it's presented in the book, nor are lists required for predefined functions. So, it's still confusing, but at least it's functional, I guess.

share|improve this question
    
What version of pandas are you using? On the latest master for .agg(lambda x: np.mean(x)) I get NaNs back in the key2 column. The documentation on agg doesn't mention this at all, and it should. Care to open an issue on github about this? –  TomAugspurger Feb 11 '14 at 19:28
    
I've got pandas 0.13.1 (and numpy 1.7.1 and python 2.7.6, for what those are worth). I didn't see any NaNs in mine... I'll look into opening an issue on github. Thanks for the response. –  Noah Motion Feb 12 '14 at 19:46
    
This was a regression from prior to 0.13, not sure exactly when (the book is based on about 0.10 IIRC); fixed here. github.com/pydata/pandas/pull/6338; It should essentially ignore that column (and was just not catching the error) –  Jeff Feb 12 '14 at 23:15

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