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I have a node.js server with socket.io. My clients use socket.io to connect to the node.js server.

Data is transmitted from clients to server in the following way:

On the client

var Data = {'data1':'somedata1', 'data2':'somedata2'};
socket.emit('SendToServer', Data);

On the server

socket.on('SendToServer', function(Data) {
    for (var key in Data) {
           // Do some work with Data[key]
    }
});

Suppose that somebody modifies his client and emits to the server a really big chunk of data. For example:

var Data = {'data1':'somedata1', 'data2':'somedata2', ...and so on until he reach for example 'data100000':'data100000'};
socket.emit('SendToServer', Data);

Because of this loop on the server...

for (var key in Data) {
       // Do some work with Data[key]
}

... the server would take a very long time to loop through all this data.

So, what is the best solution to prevent such scenarios?

Thanks

EDIT:

I used this function to validate the object:

function ValidateObject(obj) {
    var i = 0;
    for(var key in obj) {
        i++;
        if (i > 10) { // object is too big
            return false;
        }
    }
    return false;
}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

Maybe destroy buffer size is what you need.

From the wiki:

  • destroy buffer size defaults to 10E7

Used by the HTTP transports. The Socket.IO server buffers HTTP request bodies up to this limit. This limit is not applied to websocket or flashsockets.

share|improve this answer
    
You said that the limit is not applied to websockets. But that's exactly what I need. I need a limit for data sent thru websockets. –  user3179196 Feb 12 '14 at 13:40

Well, I'll go with the Javascript side of the thing... let's say you don't want to allow users to go over a certain limit of data, you can just:

var allowedSize = 10;

Object.keys(Data).map(function( key, idx ) {
    if( idx > allowedSize ) return;
    // Do some work with Data[key]
});

this not only allows you to properly cycle through the elements of your object, it lets you limit easily. ( obviously this can also ruin your own pre-set requests )

share|improve this answer
    
That's fine for server side validation. But I want to prevent big chunks of data to be automatically rejected so that they are not even available inside the server side code. What if somebody sends a really big object that consumes all the server memory? Is this a concern I should take into account when writing applications that use websockets or should I just do server side validation in code and that's it? –  user3179196 Feb 12 '14 at 13:45

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