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I need a list of criteria from which to create predicates to return data ordered variously according to user input. Thus, it seemed reasonable to create an entity called "SearchSpecs" with its associated subclass files SearchSpecs.h and SearchSpecs.m. In this way, my other classes can use the methods and properties in this class to essentially create a "spec sheet" from which to initiate a Core Data fetch.

However, I've noticed that there seems to be quite a bit of controversy regarding "Singletons." I'm pretty new, and to my knowledge have never created a singleton, and want to know if I'm doing so now?

Understand that I'm not wanting to reopen or fan the flames of the singleton debate, since I don't really know what it's all about. But I also don't want to create some monster in my app.

Can someone please assure me that my approach is safe and reasonable?

Here is the relevant code from my SearchSpecs.h and SearchSpecs.m files:

//
//  SearchSpecs.h
//  WMDGx
//
//  Created by Tim Jones on 2/7/14.
//  Copyright (c) 2014 TDJ. All rights reserved.
//

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>
#import <CoreData/CoreData.h>


@interface SearchSpecs : NSManagedObject


// Properties

@property (nonatomic, retain) NSDate * fromDate;
@property (nonatomic, retain) NSDate * toDate;
@property (nonatomic, retain) NSString * categoryOfInterest;
@property (nonatomic, retain) NSString * activityOfInterest;
@property (nonatomic, retain) NSString * benchmarkCategory;
@property (nonatomic, retain) NSString * benchmarkActivity;

// Set Methods

- (void) setActivityOfInterest:(NSString *)activityOfInterest;
- (void) setCategoryOfInterest:(NSString *)categoryOfInterest;
- (void) setBenchmarkActivity:(NSString *)benchmarkActivity;
- (void) setBenchmarkCategory:(NSString *)benchmarkCategory;
- (void) setFromDate:(NSDate *)fromDate;
- (void) setToDate:(NSDate *)toDate;

// Create and delete

- (void) createFreshSpecSheet;
- (void) saveSpecSheet;
- (void) deleteSpecSheet;

@end

//
//  SearchSpecs.m
//  WMDGx
//
//  Created by Tim Jones on 2/7/14.
//  Copyright (c) 2014 TDJ. All rights reserved.
//

#import "SearchSpecs.h"


@implementation SearchSpecs

@dynamic toDate;
@dynamic fromDate;
@dynamic benchmarkCategory;
@dynamic benchmarkActivity;
@dynamic categoryOfInterest;
@dynamic activityOfInterest;


- (void) setActivityOfInterest:(NSString *)activityOfInterest
{

}

- (void) setCategoryOfInterest:(NSString *)categoryOfInterest
{

}

- (void) setBenchmarkActivity:(NSString *)benchmarkActivity
{

}

- (void) setBenchmarkCategory:(NSString *)benchmarkCategory
{

}

- (void) setFromDate:(NSDate *)fromDate
{

}

- (void) setToDate:(NSDate *)toDate
{

}

- (void) createFreshSpecSheet

{

}

- (void) saveSpecSheet
{

}

- (void) deleteSpecSheet
{

}



@end

Thanks for helping!

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6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

By now you know this is not a singleton. It is also not a properly formed subclass of NSManagedObject. Why? You are defining properties and accessors. This is going to cause you some confusion. Your header should read:

@interface SearchSpec : NSManagedObject

// Properties

@property (nonatomic, retain) NSDate *fromDate;
@property (nonatomic, retain) NSDate *toDate;
@property (nonatomic, retain) NSString *categoryOfInterest;
@property (nonatomic, retain) NSString *activityOfInterest;
@property (nonatomic, retain) NSString *benchmarkCategory;
@property (nonatomic, retain) NSString *benchmarkActivity;

@end

The set accessors are redundant because the properties will do that for you. Your create, add, etc. are also redundant because that is what Core Data is going to handle for you. So your implementation will now look like this:

@implementation SearchSpec

@dynamic fromDate;
@dynamic toDate;
@dynamic categoryOfInterest;
@dynamic activityOfInterest;
@dynamic benchmarkCategory;
@dynamic benchmarkActivity;

@end

A lot cleaner. How do you create an instance then? Not with [[SearchSpec alloc] init]! You need to ask Core Data to create it for you:

NSManagedObjectContext *moc = ...; //Use your existing MOC
SearchSpec *spec = [NSEntityDescription insertNewObjectForEntityForName:@"SearchSpec" inManagedObjectContext:moc];

To delete an existing spec:

NSManagedObjectContext *moc = ...; //Use your existing MOC
SearchSpec *spec = ...; //Your existing spec object
[moc deleteObject:spec];

And finally, to save any changes you have made to a spec:

NSManagedObjectContext *moc = ...; //Use your existing MOC
SearchSpec *spec = ...; //Your existing spec object
NSError *error = nil;
if ([moc save:&error] == NO) {
    NSLog(@"Error saving spec: %@\n%@", [error localizedDescription], [error userInfo]);
}

Core Data manages the life-cycle of your data for you. So you use the context to add/delete/update data objects.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, my original files looked just as you have shown here--that's the way they were created by "Editor>Create NSManagedObject subclass..." The methods were added in an attempt to follow the suggestions in [this SO answer] (stackoverflow.com/questions/11048086/…). It seemed a little redundant while I was writing it. OTOH, a lot of Objective C code seems redundant or reciprocating at first to my student mind. Many thanks for the clarity you provided! –  rattletrap99 Feb 11 '14 at 20:02

A singleton is a class where there's only one instance, ever. You can usually recognize singletons because they have a class method named something like sharedInstance or defaultManager that retrieves the single instance. You just have another entity type. It might be a de facto singleton if you only create one of them, but it's not technically a singleton unless it's impossible to create more instances.

Your approach, as described, is reasonable. Given the attributes of your SearchSpecs entity though, you might find it more convenient to save them in a property list, as an array of dictionaries. It depends how you'll use them. If you'll be doing things like looking up all instances of SearchSpecs that have specific values for their benchmarkCategory or activityOfInterest, then putting them in Core Data and using predicates to find the right instances will help. On the other hand if you'll be doing something where you run through all instances every time, using Core Data won't help.

One side note: as a matter of style I'd suggest naming the entity SearchSpec instead of SearchSpecs. Each instance is a single search spec, so if it were me I wouldn't pluralize the entity name.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for taking the time to read and answer! Please see answer by Marcus, which expanded on the issue. –  rattletrap99 Feb 11 '14 at 20:09
    
@Tom--you make a valid point about the pluralization of the entity name, and I understand the concept. I come from a mechanical engineering background, though, and a list of specifications will generally be called a "spec sheet" or simply "the specs," even though it's a single sheet of paper. And in this case the "specs" are the attributes of each instance of the entity. Thus, it was just second nature for me to use that name. All my other entities are named in the singular. But I appreciate the friendly reminder! –  rattletrap99 Feb 11 '14 at 22:12
    
I come from an engineering background too, so I'm familiar with the usage. Based on your description it sounds like each instance of SearchSpecs would roughly correspond to a single line on a spec sheet, as opposed to the complete specs. All instances together would collectively be "the specs". But I may not have the full picture of how this entity will be used. –  Tom Harrington Feb 11 '14 at 22:16
    
Each instance will contain--as its properties, dictated by user input--the several specifications of a single fetch. Meaning that, for example, the property "fromDate" specifies the date from which to begin timeframe of the search, and so on. I think we're talking semantics here, but I defer to your greater experience. It doesn't seem that this could cause a problem, particularly since this is the only deviation from my habit of naming entities in the singular. Please let me know if I'm risking a problem within the scope of this app. If I am, easy to change it, and I want to oblige. Thanks! –  rattletrap99 Feb 12 '14 at 0:27
    
I'm only talking about naming, not about how it works. If it makes sense to you, it's good. –  Tom Harrington Feb 12 '14 at 1:02

No. You have declared a class. That is not a singleton.

If you were to enforce no more than one SearchSpecs existed and that one instance was shared among all clients, then you would have a singleton.

Your clients have the ability to create multiple SearchSpecs instances; each instance with its own data.

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Thanks for taking the time to read and answer! Please see answer by Marcus, which expanded on the issue. –  rattletrap99 Feb 11 '14 at 20:09

As others have clearly stated you are NOT creating a singleton.

The question is whether you wanted to? If you intend to only have one instance of this class and be able to reference it form multiple classes for some reason then chances are you may want to create a singleton instance of this class.

you can do so by adding the following Class method

in your .h

+ (instancetype) sharedSearchSpecs;

in your .m

 + (instancetype) sharedSearchSpecs{
    static id sharedSearchSpecs = nil;
    static dispatch_once_t onceToken;
    dispatch_once(&onceToken, ^{
        sharedSearchSpecs = [[SearchSpecs alloc] init];
    });

    return sharedSearchSpecs;
}

This will give a single instance of this class

As for the debate about whether singletons are good or bad. It's not a question of that, although some will argue that its is. It's a question of what you need and whether it appropriate and efficient in your project. So go nuts and enjoy

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there is no instanceType but instancetype :) –  Julian Król Feb 11 '14 at 18:05
1  
Since this is a subclass of NSManagedObject, he should definitely NOT be creating it as a singleton. –  Marcus S. Zarra Feb 11 '14 at 18:50
    
Thanks for taking the time to read and answer! Please see answer by Marcus, which expanded on the issue. –  rattletrap99 Feb 11 '14 at 20:06

What you have is just an object.

For example, your AppDelegate is the closest thing to a singleton (but it is really not, thanks Marcus for clarifying that).

Singleton is a static object that you keep through the life of your application. This static object can be accessed from everywhere in your app. So now it depends on where you would like to keep the object you provided the code for. If you want to be able to access it from anywhere in your app and you need only one reference to it, it is considered a singleton.

I hope that helps! Happy coding :)

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1  
AppDelegate is not a singleton. AppDelegate is just an object that happens to be the delegate of the UIApplication instance that controls your application. The UIApplication is also not a singleton, your application just happens to only have one. There are actually very few true singletons in the Apple frameworks. Just a lot of convenience methods that lead you to believe they are singletons. –  Marcus S. Zarra Feb 11 '14 at 19:01
    
That makes sense, but I was always under the impression of it being a singleton because it kind of fits the profile. Thanks @MarcusS.Zarra –  P. Sami Feb 11 '14 at 19:13
    
It is just a delegate. You can only have one delegate but that doesn't mean you can't change the delegate to something else and destroy the current delegate. A singleton is a unique, indestructible object. AppDelegate doesn't qualify. Few things in Apple's frameworks do qualify. –  Marcus S. Zarra Feb 11 '14 at 19:16
    
Thanks for taking the time to read and answer! Please see answer by Marcus, which expanded on the issue. –  rattletrap99 Feb 11 '14 at 20:08

Since you can do this

SearchSpecs *spec = [[SearchSpecs alloc] init];

you create an instance and hence its not a singleton. I see no problems with your implementation.

However if you do want to create a singleton, and not have a static class with static methods(which you don't looking at the properties in the SearchSpecs class) you can modify

-(id)init
{
    static SearchSpecs *singleton;
    if(singleton == nil)
        singleton = [super init];

    return singleton;
}

or something similar to make sure there is only one copy of SearchSpecs out there. There are probably better ways to create a singleton, though. This is quick and dirty.

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1  
instead of id use instancetype since iOS 7 :) –  Julian Król Feb 11 '14 at 18:04
    
@viperking instancetype was introduced long before iOS 7 and actually has no relation to the OS. it is a contextual compiler keyword. –  vikingosegundo Feb 11 '14 at 18:20
    
@vikingosegundo it was but silently it was introduces with XCode 5 and new clang if we want to be 100% correct :) so in fact it is available for developers starting with XCode 5 and iOS 7 –  Julian Król Feb 11 '14 at 18:29
    
Thanks for taking the time to read and answer! Please see answer by Marcus, which expanded on the issue. –  rattletrap99 Feb 11 '14 at 20:08
    
@viperking, not true. it was introduced with xcode 4.4 –  vikingosegundo Feb 11 '14 at 22:16

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