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For lists, the method list.index(x) returns the index in the list of the first item whose value is x. But if I want to look inside the list items, and not just at the whole items, how do I make the most Pythoninc method for this?

For example, with

l = ['the cat ate the mouse','the tiger ate the chicken','the horse ate the straw']

this function would return 1 provided with the argument tiger.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 14 down vote accepted

A non-slicky method:

def index_containing_substring(the_list, substring):
    for i, s in enumerate(the_list):
        if substring in s:
              return i
    return -1
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Slicker than mine I'd say. +1~ –  Etienne Perot Jan 31 '10 at 7:31

This is quite slick and fairly efficient.

>>> def find(lst, predicate):
...     return (i for i, j in enumerate(lst) if predicate(j)).next()
... 
>>> l = ['the cat ate the mouse','the tiger ate the chicken','the horse ate the straw']
>>> find(l, lambda x: 'tiger' in x)
1

Only problem is that it will raise StopIteration if the item is not found (though that is easily remedied).

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1  
StopIteration can be avoided: return next((i for i,j in enumerate(lst) if predicate(j)), -1) (Python 2.6+) –  vsvasya Mar 19 '12 at 20:23
def find(l, s):
    for i in range(len(l)):
        if l[i].find(s)!=-1:
            return i
    return None # Or -1
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def first_substring(strings, substring):
    return min(i for i, string in enumerate(strings) if substring in string)

Note: This will raise ValueError in case no match is found, which is better in my opinion.

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Fancy but not efficient, as it tests all elements of the list regardless of whether the text has been found previously or not. Also, Python's 'something'.find(s) function returns -1 when no match is found, so I'd call that Pythonic. –  Etienne Perot Jan 31 '10 at 7:38
    
Does not work, at least in Python 2.6. You can't use both an iterable and an extra argument in min(). @Etiene: this is a generator expression, not a list comprehension, so it wouldn't generate everything. –  Max Shawabkeh Jan 31 '10 at 7:40
    
@Etienne - premature optimization is the root of all evil etc. @Max - you are correct, fixed. –  abyx Jan 31 '10 at 7:46

Variation of abyx solution (optimised to stop when the match is found)

def first_substring(strings, substring):
    return next(i for i, string in enumerate(strings) if substring in string)

If you are pre 2.6 you'll need to put the next() at the end

def first_substring(strings, substring):
    return (i for i, string in enumerate(strings) if substring in string).next()
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  >>> li = ['my','array','with','words']
  >>> reduce(lambda tup, word: (tup[0], True) if not tup[1] and word  == 'my' else (tup[0]+1 if not tup[1] else tup[0], tup[1]), li, (0, False))[0]
  0
  >>> reduce(lambda tup, word: (tup[0], True) if not tup[1] and word  == 'words' else (tup[0]+1 if not tup[1] else tup[0], tup[1]), li, (0, False))[0]
  3
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