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I have the following inverted data frame

z
      Jan   Feb    Mar   Apr   May   Jun    Jul    Aug   Sep   Oct   Nov    Dec
14                     -8.70  0.28 18.66   4.81 -34.33 40.39  3.09  7.89  49.41
13  -6.10  9.51  -1.09 -0.01  7.89 -7.37  -0.61  -9.79 31.75 40.67  5.41 -10.53
12  -5.21  7.49  -7.92  3.54 11.19 -6.66  23.64  13.21  9.64 14.44 59.95 -20.96
11 -12.68 11.04 -11.10 -6.18 -5.61  8.93  94.99  30.15 14.37 31.08 -9.02 -14.77
10   5.07 -2.04  22.77 12.05  0.38 -3.28  -2.73  11.26  5.30  4.61 13.80   3.68
9   -0.82  0.86   3.18  1.06  6.47  1.57   2.25  -9.34  5.27  7.25  2.85   0.42
8   10.48  1.17  10.97 -0.13  0.32 -5.89  -2.26  -7.28 -1.39  3.35 14.81   3.40
7   -5.22  3.09  -7.75 -3.41 -0.09 12.37 -17.38   1.41  8.57 10.48 -1.20   7.45
6   13.85  7.22   3.14 -2.92 -7.12  0.45   3.51  -2.30  7.07 -2.83 -2.27  -1.52
5   -0.57  0.58  -2.59  3.29 -6.07  0.37   1.32  -0.58  4.07 -4.85 -0.48   1.66
4    0.46 -0.41   3.01  0.60  2.20 -2.39   0.22   3.99  5.50 16.07 -4.51   0.50
3    1.28  5.10  -3.61  5.02  3.04 -4.05  -2.64   1.88 -2.44  3.27 -2.71   2.02
2   -1.28  0.99   2.38  0.16  1.03 10.93   5.07   0.26  0.84 -0.05 -0.88  -3.71
1    2.33 -1.71  -0.41 -0.58 -2.19  1.26   1.88  -4.03  0.54  0.34  0.22  -0.50

I would like to find out which column has the last data point in this example -0.50 and extract the column name in this case Dec as a number (12), without using the -0.50 data point, tried wrong with the below expressions

which( colnames(z)==-0.50)
integer(0)
which( colnames(z)==z[length(z)])
integer(0)

Second example

      Jan   Feb    Mar   Apr   May   Jun   Jul   Aug   Sep    Oct   Nov   Dec
18                                                         -12.97  9.96  8.14
17   1.50  3.27   7.38 -1.63  8.53  2.97  1.51 10.99  4.51  -5.70  1.15  9.50
16  -1.38  3.61  -3.98 10.51 -8.39  5.29 -2.01 -3.47 -0.17  -6.20 13.93  9.04
15  -3.96  1.72  -3.28  2.06 -0.26 -1.27 -4.58  3.23 -7.76   2.09  7.33 16.81
14   4.38  0.56   7.09 -5.31 -2.61 -2.66  0.66  0.56  4.64  13.75 -7.10 -5.15
13 -10.13 -6.04  12.62 -3.76 -3.96  7.95  4.71  6.04  7.63  -7.96 -0.69 14.16
12   5.95 11.95 -10.80  2.45 10.19 -5.20 -0.68  0.62  0.26   4.72 -2.48 10.27
11   2.72 11.56  -0.80 -8.62  0.28 -2.96  1.33  3.09  5.14   4.03  6.37 -0.19
10  -5.38  6.58   4.64 -4.21  6.62  3.13 -1.85  7.63 -6.17  -2.95  7.32 -4.37
9    4.20 -2.58   4.01  5.66 -2.94 -1.17 -0.47  4.54 -1.10   1.48  3.24  2.14
8    3.86 -5.93  -3.95  6.46  5.05  1.91 -1.18 -0.88  6.99   2.52  2.42  0.24
7    3.85  7.95  -0.66 -0.99  1.99  5.06 -4.63 -3.00 -0.41   3.73  4.97  2.10
6    0.99 -0.21  -1.64 -3.01 -2.03 -1.26 -1.52  0.32  2.85  -1.59  5.12 -2.45
5   -2.64  2.33   4.91  1.75 -1.01  1.47 -2.78  4.78  0.94   2.51 -2.01  3.75
4    0.08  1.51   0.25  3.00 -2.16 -2.51  4.59  1.43  0.16  -2.59  0.97  1.65
3    0.63 -0.83  -0.68  0.12 -0.22 -3.17  4.41 -1.29 -2.18  -2.54  1.00  1.36
2    2.51  0.17   2.66  3.41 -2.40 -1.77 -0.63 -3.80  3.47   3.20  2.20  0.37
1   -2.37

Last point is Jan -2.37

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Are you looking for something like which(z == -.5, arr.ind=TRUE)? Your question isn't really clear. Also, look out for floating point problems with what you're describing. – A Handcart And Mohair Feb 11 '14 at 18:07
    
I was looking to select the column where the last data point is and to extract the column name or its corresponding number as length(z) =12 however without the specific number as have to apply it to other tables. – Barnaby Feb 11 '14 at 18:15
    
I do not really understand your question. If @AnandaMahto's answer is not the one you are looking for, maybe you could simply use ncol(z)? – sgibb Feb 11 '14 at 18:25
    
thanks for your time and appologies if the question is not clear. I am Looking to extract the column number that coincides with the last data point in z, if possible without using the data point -0.50 or using ncol(z) which happens to be the last column the same as the last data point. – Barnaby Feb 11 '14 at 18:39
2  
Please dput your data so we can figure out exactly what we're dealing with here. – BrodieG Feb 11 '14 at 19:18
up vote 1 down vote accepted

My answer is based on @BrodieG's one.

You could try nchar to test for "empty cells":

tail(which(nchar(as.matrix(z)) == 0, arr.ind=TRUE), 1)
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, Can I ask you the reason for the conversion into a matrix of z – Barnaby Feb 11 '14 at 21:18
    
@Barnaby: nchar counts the number of characters per column if you use a data.frame. To get the number of characters per cell I transform it into a matrix. – sgibb Feb 12 '14 at 10:47
col <- max(which(!is.na(t(as.matrix(z))))) %% ncol(z)
if(!col) col <- ncol(z)
names(z)[[col]] 
# [1] "Dec"

This assumes "empty" values are NA, and that z is a data frame. I tested this by removing some values from the end, and it worked as well.

share|improve this answer
    
You answer provides column 12 even when last data point is not Dec. – Barnaby Feb 11 '14 at 19:15
    
@Barnaby, are the empty data points NA? If they are something else this obviously won't work, but can be updated to make it work if you provide more details on what the data is (data.frame with character, columns, etc). What represents emptyness? – BrodieG Feb 11 '14 at 19:18
    
Thanks, forgot to read your bottom line no NAs. I can try to put NAs for the issue in question. z is a table unsure if this affects the result will try now with NAs – Barnaby Feb 11 '14 at 19:21
    
@Barnaby, the only data type table that I know is the one produced by table(), which can't be the same type as what you are showing. What do you get when you do str(z)? – BrodieG Feb 11 '14 at 19:38
    
It is a data frame my appologies. – Barnaby Feb 11 '14 at 20:13

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