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sI am learning C++ and I keep getting a strange error. setprecision is giving me multiple decimal points in the one answer.

Why doe the output have multiple decimal points?

Program

#include<iostream>
#include<iomanip>
#include<math.h>
using namespace std;

int main () {

    int time, counter, range;
    double investment, rate, balance;

    cout << "Investment amount: " << endl;
    cin >> investment;
    cout << "Rate: " << endl;
    cin >> rate;
    cout << "Length of time: " << endl;
    cin >> time;    
    cout << "Incremental Range: " << endl;
    cin >> range;

    balance = 0;
    counter = 0;    

    cout << "\n\n\nRate \t 5 Years \t 10 Years \t 15 Years \t 20 Years \t 25 Years \t 30 Years \n" << endl;
    cout << fixed << setprecision(2);


    while(counter < 6)
    {
        counter = counter + 1;

        balance = investment * pow((1+ rate/100), time);

        cout << setw(2) << rate << setw(12) << balance;

        time = time + range;
    }

    cout << endl;


    return 0;    
}

Output

Rate     5 Years     10 Years    15 Years    20 Years    25 Years    30 Years 

5.00     1276.285.00     1628.895.00     2078.935.00     2653.305.00     3386.355.00     4321.94

As you can see 1276.285.00 etc should be 1276.28.

Why does the output have multiple decimal points?

share|improve this question
1  
ideone.com/fbugPL check this. You will get your response – user2897690 Feb 11 '14 at 18:44
    
It almost looks like a locale problem, except that you state 1276.285.00 etc should be 1276.28 (instead of 1,276,285.00 in the US). – jww Feb 12 '14 at 3:31
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I don't think you want to write rate each iteration:

cout << setw(2) << rate << setw(12) << balance;

The last part of "double-decimal-point" number is your rate.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry I should have seen that. Thanks – Deepend Feb 11 '14 at 18:49

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