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I keep getting a segmentation fault in this code:

#include <stdio.h> 

void FillArray(int *array, int);
#define MAX 256

int main()
{
    int *array[MAX], size = 100;
    FillArray(*array, size);
    return 0;
}

void FillArray(int *array, int size)
{
    int i, temp;
    for (i = 0; i < size; i ++)
    {
        temp = (rand()%101);
        *array = temp;
        printf ("array[%d]. %d\n", i, *array);
        array += i;
    }
    printf ("AJGIUEROGUSHFDJGJDFK/n");
}

I put the printf on the last line so that i could tell if it would reach that point, so far it hasn't.

Edit: I added code. I have to use pointer arithmetic instead of array indexes.

share|improve this question
2  
int *array[MAX] is an array of MAX pointers to int, from which you pass the 1st to the function. There are no ints defined where the latter points to. –  alk Feb 11 '14 at 18:53
    
(P.S. it's in C) -- You tagged the question C, mentioned C code in the title, and in the post itself. Wow! –  devnull Feb 11 '14 at 18:53
    
ah, that was my own stupidity –  Fredamabob Feb 11 '14 at 19:01
1  
Turn on compiler compiler warnings. Read them. This would have been trivial to find. –  Joshua Feb 11 '14 at 19:15
    
Having SO do your homework now? :P –  dev_feed Feb 11 '14 at 19:16

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your array in main is declared as an array of int * pointers. This array is not initialized, i.e. all elements contain garbage values.

Layer your FillArray call in main

FillArray(*array, size);

passes the value of *array to FillArray function. *array is the same as array[0] - it is an uninitialized garbage pointer that points nowhere.

Inside FillArray function you are attempting to access (and write) data through that uninitialized garbage pointer. Expectedly, the code crashes.

As is always the case with invalid code, there's no way to fix the error until you explain what you are trying to do.

I can only guess that all you needed is an array of int elements, not int * elements. I.e. your array in main was supposed to be declared as int array[MAX]. And FillArray should have been called as FillArray(array, size). Also, inside the cycle it is supposed to be array += 1 (or just ++array), not your array += i, which does not make any sense.

share|improve this answer
    
I am trying to "create a function called FillArray() that accepts a pointer to an integer as the array name, an integer for its size. This function randomly fills the array with integers ranging from 0 to 100. Use pointer arithmetic". –  Fredamabob Feb 11 '14 at 19:06
    
@Fredamabob: See the last paragraph of my answer. –  AnT Feb 11 '14 at 19:08
    
Ah, thank you! I see the error of my ways now! –  Fredamabob Feb 11 '14 at 19:12

If wanna fill the array passed to your function, then change

array = &temp; 

to

*array = temp; 

And also change

array += i;  

to

array++;  

EDIT: OP edited his question and want to fill an array of integers. You need to chage the declaration of your array

 int *array[MAX], size = 100;  // Declare an array of pointers

to

 int array[MAX], size = 100;   // Declates an array of ints 
share|improve this answer
    
when i do that my program crashes instantly, instead of outputting all of the values of array and then crashing, which it normally does. –  Fredamabob Feb 11 '14 at 18:48
1  
@Fredamabob The other (the now crashing) bug is in array += i. –  Timbo Feb 11 '14 at 18:48
1  
The downvoter might like to explain: Assuming the function would be called correctly this answer it fine. –  alk Feb 11 '14 at 18:57
    
@alk; On SO some downvoter do not like to explain :). –  haccks Feb 11 '14 at 19:04

Your loop should just be:

int i, temp;
for (i = 0; i < size; i ++)
{
    temp = rand() % 101;
    array[i] = temp;
    printf ("array[%d] = %d\n", i, array[i]);
}

This will do what you want. There's no need to re-assign array inside the function, although you can. It's easier to just use the indexing operator []. Remember that

a[i]

is the same as

*(a + i)

regardless of the types involved (but generally a is a pointer type and i an unsigned integer) as long as the sum is a pointer of course.

There are errors in main(), too:

  • The array should just be int array[MAX];.
  • The call should just be FillArray(array, size);.
share|improve this answer
    
sorry, i forgot to include that i have to use pointer arithmetic –  Fredamabob Feb 11 '14 at 18:53
    
How is that going to help when array inside FillArray is a garbage pointer? –  AnT Feb 11 '14 at 19:05

probably your want.

#include <stdio.h> 
#include <stdlib.h>

void FillArray(int *array, int);
#define MAX 256

int main(){
    int array[MAX], size = 100;
    FillArray(array, size);
    return 0;
}

void FillArray(int *array, int size){
    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < size; i++){
        *array = rand()%101;
        printf ("array[%d]. %d\n", i, *array);
        ++array;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

int *array[MAX] is an array of MAX pointers to int, from which you pass the 1st to the function. There are no ints defined where the latter points to.

To fix this appliy the changes void FillArray(int *array, int size) provided by the other answers and then call it like this:

int main(void)
{
  int array[MAX], size = 100;
  FillArray(array, size);
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Code is fine except for your perception that *array = &array, which is wrong !!

Below points might help in understating pointers better:

  1. *array = array[0]
  2. array = &array[0]
  3. *(array+i) = array[i]

Made changes to your code and it should work fine:

#include <stdio.h> 

void FillArray(int *array, int);
#define MAX 256

int main()
{
    int *array, size = 100;
    array=(int *)calloc(MAX,sizeof(int));
    if(array !=NULL)
    {
        FillArray(array, size);    /* While calling send &array[0] but not array[0] */
    }
    return 0;
}

void FillArray(int *array, int size)
{
    int i, temp;
    for (i = 0; i < size; i ++)
    {
        temp = (rand()%101);
        *(array+i) = temp;
        printf ("array[%d]. %d\n", i, *(array+i));
        /* array += i;             <-- not necessary */
    }
    printf ("AJGIUEROGUSHFDJGJDFK/n");
}
share|improve this answer

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