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I have a shell script which takes 1 mandatory argument and upto 3 optional arguments and I want to enhance the script by able to pass one more additional argument without breaking the current design . That is if my argument is n and existing arguments are a and b c and d the following should work

./script.sh a b c d n
./script.sh a n
./script.sh a b n
./script.sh a b c n
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2  
OK. what is your current design? –  glenn jackman Feb 11 at 19:12
    
a1=$1 a2=$2 a3=$3 a4=$4 var=($a1 $a2 $a3 $a4) for i in ${var[*]} –  sudeep mathew Feb 11 at 19:24
    
@sudeep, use "${var[@]}" for iterating over arrays -- ${var[*]} concatenates into a scalar, then string-splits and glob-expands it. –  Charles Duffy Feb 11 at 19:35
    
...to see what that means in practice, try passing a single argument with "two words". –  Charles Duffy Feb 11 at 19:36
    
How about: var=( "$@" ) -- then you can have however many arguments you need. –  glenn jackman Feb 11 at 19:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could check if the last argument is n. If so, remove it from the argument list and add the rest to an array, else add all the arguments to an array.

if [[ "${@: -1}" = n ]]; then
  for j in "${@:1:$(($#-1))}"; do
    var+=($j)
  done
else
  for j; do
    var+=($j)
  done
fi

echo "${var[@]}"

This would produce:

a b c

when the arguments to the script are a b c and a b c n.

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Not elegant, but straightforward:

case $# in
    0|1) printf >&2 "Too few arguments\n"; exit 1
         ;;
    2) first=$1
       second=$2
       ;;
    3) first=$1
       optional_a=$2
       second=$3
       ;;
    4) first=$1
       optional_a=$2
       optional_b=$3
       second=$4
       ;;
    5) first=$1
       optional_a=$2
       optional_b=$3
       optional_c=$4
       second=$5
       ;;
    *) printf >&2 "Too many optional arguments\n"; exit 1
       ;;
esac

The two required arguments are in first and second; the three optional arguments are in optional_a, optional_b, and optional_c, respectively.

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