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Long time ago, I saved a sentence from a Java reference book: "Java has no mechanism to handle deadlock. it won't even know deadlock occurred." (Head First Java 2nd Edition, p.516)

So, what is about it? Is there a way to catch deadlock case in Java? I mean, is there a way that our code understands a deadlock case occurred?

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Is Java different from other languages in this regard? –  Michael Burr Oct 19 '08 at 22:58
    
it's not impossible to detect a deadlock - it's just quite difficult –  1800 INFORMATION Oct 19 '08 at 23:00
    
for example - most databases will detect deadlocks –  1800 INFORMATION Oct 19 '08 at 23:01
    
Java may not have a mechanism to 'handle' deadlocks, but it DOES know about deadlocks. Read my post bellow and I explain how... –  Jeach Dec 8 '11 at 20:53

14 Answers 14

Since JDK 1.5 there are very useful methods in the java.lang.management package to find and inspect deadlocks that occurs. See the findMonitorDeadlockedThreads() and findDeadlockedThreads() method of the ThreadMXBean class.

A possible way to use this is to have a separate watchdog thread (or periodic task) that does this.

Sample code:

  ThreadMXBean tmx = ManagementFactory.getThreadMXBean();
  long[] ids = tmx.findDeadlockedThreads();
  if (ids != null) {
     ThreadInfo[] infos = tmx.getThreadInfo(ids, true, true);
     System.out.println("The following threads are deadlocked:");
     for (ThreadInfo ti : infos) {
        System.out.println(ti);
     }
  }
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JConsole is able to detect deadlocks in a running application.

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JDK 5 and 6 will dump held lock information in a full thread dump (obtained with kill -3, jstack, jconsole, etc). JDK 6 even contains information about ReentrantLock and ReentrantReadWriteLock. It is possible from this information to diagnose a deadlock by finding a lock cycle: Thread A holds lock 1, Thread B holds lock 2, and either A is requesting 2 or B is requesting 1. From my experience, this is usually pretty obvious.

Other analysis tools can actually find potential deadlocks even if they don't occur. Thread tools from vendors like OptimizeIt, JProbe, Coverity, etc are good places to look.

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In general java does not offer deadlock detection. The synchronized keyword and built in monitors make it somewhat more difficult to reason about deadlock than in languages with explicit locking.

I would suggest migrating to using java.util.concurrent.Lock locks and the like in order to make your locking schemes easier to reason about. In fact you could easily make your own implementation of the lock interface with deadlock detection. The algorithm is to basically traverse the lock dependency graph and look for a cycle.

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2  
The locks in java.util.concurrent.Lock have deadlock detection built in as of JDK 1.6. See java.lang.management.ThreadMXBean. –  staffan Oct 20 '08 at 9:56

Deadlocks can be avoided if you follow a simple rule: have all threads claim and release their locks in the same order. In this way, you never get into a situation where a deadlock can occur.

Even the dining philosophers problem can be seen as a violation of this rule as it uses relative concepts of left and right spoon which result in different threads using different allocation orders of the spoons.

In my opinion, prevention is better than cure.

This is one of the two guidelines I like to follow to ensure threads work properly. The other is ensuring each thread is solely responsible for its own execution as it's the only one fully aware of what it's doing at any point in time.

So that means no Thread.stop calls, use a global flag (or message queue or something like that) to tell another thread you want action taken. Then let that thread do the actual work.

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1  
While this is the canonical answer, it's not always possible. There are other ways to avoid deadlock as well. For example, you can use timed tryLocks (with a ReentrantLock) to do back-out. –  Alex Miller Oct 21 '08 at 12:47

If you are on Java 5 you can call the method findMonitorDeadlockedThreads() on the ThreadMXBean which you can get through a call of java.lang.management.ManagementFactory.getThreadMXBean(). This will find deadlocks caused by object monitors only. On Java 6 there's findDeadlockedThreads() which will also find deadlocks caused by "ownable synchronizers (for example ReentrandLock and ReentrantReadWriteLock).

Be aware that it will probably be expensive to call these methods, so they should be used for troubleshooting purposes only.

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Note that there is a type of deadlock using the concurrent package that is very hard to debug. That is where you have a ReentrantReadWriteLock and one thread grabs the read lock and then (say) tries to enter a monitor held by some other thread that is also waiting to grab the write lock. What makes it especially hard to debug is that there is no record of who has entered a read lock. It is simply a count. The thread might even have thrown an exception and died leaving the read count non-zero.

Here is a sample deadlock that the findDeadlockedThreads method mentioned earlier won't get:

import java.util.concurrent.locks.*;
import java.lang.management.*;

public class LockTest {

    static ReentrantReadWriteLock lock = new ReentrantReadWriteLock();

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        Reader reader = new Reader();
        Writer writer = new Writer();
        sleep(10);
        System.out.println("finding deadlocked threads");
        ThreadMXBean tmx = ManagementFactory.getThreadMXBean();
        long[] ids = tmx.findDeadlockedThreads();
        if (ids != null) {
            ThreadInfo[] infos = tmx.getThreadInfo(ids, true, true);
            System.out.println("the following threads are deadlocked:");
            for (ThreadInfo ti : infos) {
                System.out.println(ti);
            }
        }
        System.out.println("finished finding deadlocked threads");
    }

    static void sleep(int seconds) {
        try {
            Thread.currentThread().sleep(seconds*1000);
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {}
    }

    static class Reader implements Runnable {
        Reader() {
            new Thread(this).start();
        }
        public void run() {
            sleep(2);
            System.out.println("reader thread getting lock");
            lock.readLock().lock();
            System.out.println("reader thread got lock");
            synchronized (lock) {
                System.out.println("reader thread inside monitor!");
                lock.readLock().unlock();
            }
        }
    }

    static class Writer implements Runnable {
        Writer() {
            new Thread(this).start();
        }
        public void run() {
            synchronized (lock) {
                sleep(4);
                System.out.println("writer thread getting lock");
                lock.writeLock().lock();
                System.out.println("writer thread got lock!");
            }
        }
    }
}
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Dr. Heinz Kabutz of JavaSpecialists has written an entertaining and informative newsletter issue on Java deadlocks and describes something called a ThreadMXBean in another newsletter issue. Between those, you should get a good idea of the issues and some pointers to doing your own instrumentation.

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Not exactly what you asked, but when a deadlock does occur, you can do a "kill -3" on the process id and it dumps a thread dump to stdout. Also, the 1.6 jvm has some tools to do the same thing in a gui manner.

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If you are running from the command-line and you suspect that you are deadlocked, try ctrl+break in windows (ctrl+\ in unix) to get a thread dump. See http://java.sun.com/javase/6/webnotes/trouble/TSG-VM/html/gbmps.html

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If you're debugging in eclipse, you can pause the application (select the app in the debug view and the little || button on the debug toolbar) and then it can report deadlocks.

See http://runnerwhocodes.blogspot.com/2007/10/deadlock-detection-with-eclipse.html for an example.

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Java can detect deadlocks (although not at run-time, it can still diagnose and report it).

For example, when using a slightly modified version of 'Saurabh M. Chande' code bellow (changed it to Java and added some timing to guarantee a lock on each run). Once you run it and it deadlocks, if you type:

kill -3 PID   # where 'PID' is the Linux process ID

It will generate a stack dump, which will include the following information:

Found one Java-level deadlock:
=============================
"Thread-0":
     waiting to lock monitor 0x08081670 (object 0x7f61ddb8, a Deadlock$A),
     which is held by "main"
"main":
      waiting to lock monitor 0x080809f0 (object 0x7f61f3b0, a Deadlock$B),
      which is held by "Thread-0"
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After so long, i am able to write the simplest example of Deadlock. Comments are welcome.

Class A
{
  synchronized void methodA(B b)
  {
    b.last();
  }

  synchronized void last()
  {
    SOP(“ Inside A.last()”);
  }
}

Class B
{
  synchronized void methodB(A a)
  {
    a.last();
  }

  synchronized void last()
  {
    SOP(“ Inside B.last()”);
  }
}


Class Deadlock implements Runnable 
{
  A a = new A(); 
  B b = new B();

  // Constructor
  Deadlock()
  {
    Thread t = new Thread(); 
    t.start();
    a.methodA(b);
  }

  public void run()
  {
    b.methodB(a);
  }

  public static void main(String args[] )
  {
    new Deadlock();
  }
}
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not supposed to copy code from a book –  kTiwari Aug 28 '12 at 17:55
    
@kTiwari What book? If it's plagarism I'll flag it. –  Approaching Darkness Fish Jan 24 at 0:47

you have to modify the code a little bit in the Deadlock Class

   Deadlock() {
    Therad t = new Thread(this); // modified
    t.start();
    System.out.println(); //any instruction to delay
    a.methodA(b);
}

Also the above code will not always cause a dead lock, only some times it may happen.

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Delays is a lame method to avoid deadlocks for ultra lazy developers who dont want learn wait notify kinda. We are plagued by such code written everywhere. –  Siddharth Nov 1 '12 at 5:17

protected by Brad Larson Sep 2 '11 at 3:29

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