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I have a generic tree, the generic parameter is the data type stored by the nodes:

class TreeNode<D>{  
    public D data;  
    .....
}

Then a visitor interface to use along with a tree transversal:

interface Visitor<D> {
    void visit(TreeNode<D> node);
}

Some visitors can take advantage of generics:

class DataListCreator<D> implements Visitor<D> {
    List<D> dataList = new ArrayList<D>();
    public void visit(TreeNode<D> node) {
         dataList.add(node.data);
    }
    public List<D> getDataList() {
        return dataList;
    }

But others don't, they would fit better in a raw class

class NodeCounter implements Visitor {
    private int nodeCount = 0;
    public void visit(TreeNode node) {
        nodeCount++;
    }
    public int count() {
        return nodeCount;
    }

But I don't know how implement this last case, the code above don't compile as I have to implement the generic interface not the raw one. I tried implementing

Visitor<?> 

with the same result. So my question is, I'm forced to use a generic type

NodeCounter<D> 

to implement the Visitor interface?.

Thanks.

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4 Answers

the code above don't compile

I tried compiling your example, and it works fine. I'm using Java 6. What was the compilation error you got?

This is what I successfully compiled:

class TreeNode<D>{  
    public D data;  
}

interface Visitor<D> {
    void visit(TreeNode<D> node);
}

class NodeCounter implements Visitor {
    private int nodeCount = 0;
    public void visit(TreeNode node) {
        nodeCount++;
    }
    public int count() {
        return nodeCount;
    }
}
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Oh, thaks for pointing that, I'm using a rahter old version of InelliJ that gave me this error. I will update everyting as I'm not very happy with doubling my classes –  user262843 Jan 31 '10 at 10:50
    
I wouldn't be happy about it either :-) –  Eli Acherkan Jan 31 '10 at 11:18
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Java generics are very powerful, and raw types should almost never be necessary.

You probably want to put some wildcards in. For instance, a visitor may need not know the exact generic argument of the TreeNodes it is visiting:

interface TreeNodeVisitor<D> {
    void visit(TreeNode<? extends D> node);
}

Perhaps better(?), a TreeNode may not need to know the exact type of visitor.

interface TreeNode<D> {
    void accept(TreeNodeVisitor<? super D> visitor);
}
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What is the practical difference between: void visit(TreeNode<? extends D> node); and just: void visit(TreeNode<D> node); I mean, in both cases the visit method would accpet the same types as argument. Or I'm wrong? Is there any practical advantage on using this more involved syntax? –  user262843 Jan 31 '10 at 12:12
    
@Tom, can you give a working (i.e. a compiling) example of the classes in this example, generified as you suggest? –  Avi Jan 31 '10 at 13:18
    
@Pepin, If you had a if D was Object, then using ? extends D would allow, say, a TreeNode<String> as the argument. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Jan 31 '10 at 13:50
    
Do you mean having a TreeNode<String> instance and willing to visit it with a Visitor<Object> instance?. In this case I think there would be additional problems, as the method that makes the transversal is expecting a Visitor<String> as argumet. –  user262843 Jan 31 '10 at 14:58
    
@Pepin Not if the method that makes the transversal is expecting a Vistor<? super String> as Tom Hawtin indicated. –  ILMTitan Feb 1 '10 at 17:20
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In short - yes, you do need to give the generic interface a type argument.

What you probably should do, is implemenet a non-generic (and possibly empty) interface ITreeNode, that ITreeNode<D> inherits from. Any methods that don't need to be generic are declared in this intercace instead. Then, do the same thing for IVisitor, and NodeCounter can inherit the non-generic Visitor interface.

Short schematic:

ITreeNode
ITreeNode<D> implements TreeNode

IVisitor
IVisitor<D> implements IVisitor

NodeCounter implements IVisitor

(Note: I used the C# convention to prefix interfaces with I. NodeCounter is meant to be a class, while the others are interfaces...)

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Java Generics are explicitly designed to be interoperable with raw types using a technique known as Erasure.

So the situation you are describing is directly supported and should compile fine:

class TreeNode<D>{
    public D data;  
}

interface Visitor<D> {
    void visit(TreeNode<D> node);
}

class NodeCounter implements Visitor {
    private int nodeCount = 0;
    public void visit(TreeNode node) {
        nodeCount++;
    }
    public int count() {
        return nodeCount;
    }
}
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Thanks for looking on that. I'm updating my Java implemetation to see I can get rid of the reported error, maybe caused by and old IDE version. –  user262843 Jan 31 '10 at 12:17
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