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UPDATE: Interestingly, after almost 15min, I seem to have AUTOMATICALLY restored about 500MB. Hows this happening?

I'm on Mac OSX 10.5.6(Leopard). I wrote a python script for a Project-Euler problem. My script had a loop which iterated for an enormous count like 600851475143.

Used Vi and Python on Mac's Terminal.

I didn't get the result even after running for 5min. I left it to run till it gets a result. Then I got error "Your Startup disk is almost full".

I was shocked to see my disk having just 38MB free while it used to have atleast 1GB free. I immediately terminated "Terminal". But now I don't know how to get my memory back. :(


Can somebody please tell me how to recover the memory used for execution of my script?


Here's the script:

# Program to Find Largest Prime Factor of 600851475143

def isPrime(n):           #Check if Prime or Not
    i,notFactor=2,False
    while i<n:
        if(n%i==0):
            break
        notFactor=True
        i = i+1
    return notFactor

test = 600851475143       #Number to Test
i = test-1

while i>1:                #Finds Factors and See if they are Prime
    print i
    if test%i==0:
        if isPrime(i)==True:  #Syntax Error Fixed. Thanks, batbrat!
            print i
            break
    i=i-1
share|improve this question
    
then show your Python script.! –  ghostdog74 Jan 31 '10 at 11:01
1  
As a guess - I don't have a mac anymore - use one of the disk space visualisers to show what the large file is and (if it's not your swap space) delete it. If it is your swap space, move swap to a different partition with more space. –  Pete Kirkham Jan 31 '10 at 11:03
    
By "memory", I assume you mean diskspace? In which case we need to see the script to tell you where you were writing stuff. –  Epcylon Jan 31 '10 at 11:07
1  
Don't you want if isPrime(i) == True: #Do something? isprime is a function ... –  batbrat Jan 31 '10 at 11:24
    
Ooops.. My bad. Changed it. Still pretty new to python and coding in general. –  r0ach Jan 31 '10 at 11:28

3 Answers 3

The only way your script can fill up your disk is if it creates large/many temporary files and doesn't clean up. Just running a Python program cannot itself fill up your disk.

To recover the disk space, you need to figure out where the space is spent and remove the temporary files. Not sure how to do that on OSX, though. On Windows and Linux there are several excellent tools for visualizing disk usage.

EDIT: Euler-problems are designed to be solved in under a minute, even on modestly powerful computers. If you're spending 5 minutes, you're approaching the problem the wrong way.

share|improve this answer

What I first though was that your program used a lot of memory which caused the swap file to grow. However, from the code I can see that it does not consume much memory. Therefore this script is not the cause of the lost space.

share|improve this answer

That's not python, that's something else on your system using memory... probably your browser.

1GB is not nearly enough free space on a Mac... you need at least 10GB free, so it's time to clean up.

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