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I have a string like "1.5%" and want to convert it to double value.

It can be done simple with following:

public static double FromPercentageString(this string value)
{
    return double.Parse(value.SubString(0, value.Length - 1)) / 100;
}

but I don't want to use this parsing approach.

Is any other approach with IFormatProvider or something like this?

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8 Answers

up vote 18 down vote accepted

If you care about catching formatting errors, I would use TrimEnd rather than Replace. Replace would allow formatting errors to pass undetected.

var num = decimal.Parse( value.TrimEnd( new char[] { '%', ' ' } ) ) / 100M;

This will ensure that the value must be some decimal number followed by any number of spaces and percent signs, i.e, it must at least start with a value in the proper format. To be more precise you might want to split on '%', not removing empty entries, then make sure that there are only two results and the second is empty. The first should be the value to convert.

var pieces = value.Split( '%' );
if (pieces.Length > 2  || !string.IsNullOrEmpty(pieces[1]))
{ 
    ... some error handling ... 
}
var num = decimal.Parse( pieces[0] ) / 100M;

Using Replace will allow you to successfully, and wrongfully IMO, parse things like:

  • %1.5
  • 1%.5
  • 1.%5

in addtion to 1.5%

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You can use if (value.EndsWith("%")) ... –  mini-me Mar 31 at 12:34
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It is culture sensitive, replace it like this:

  value = value.Replace(System.Globalization.CultureInfo.CurrentCulture.NumberFormat.PercentSymbol, "");

Then parse it.

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+1 Wonderfully simple solution –  Forty-Two Sep 4 '12 at 19:03
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TypeConverter provides a unified way of converting types of values to other types, as well as for accessing standard values and subproperties. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.componentmodel.typeconverter%28VS.80%29.aspx

This is probably overkill for one-off conversions. It is far more useful when binding properties in ASP.NET or XAML, or when parsing config files.

var result = new Percentage("1.5%");
double d = result.Value;

Percentage and its TypeConverter are defined as:

[TypeConverter(typeof(PercentageConverter))]
public struct Percentage
{
    public double Value;

    public Percentage( double value )
    {
        Value = value;
    }

    public Percentage( string value )
    {
        var pct = (Percentage) TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(GetType()).ConvertFromString(value);
        Value = pct.Value;
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return ToString(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);
    }

    public string ToString(CultureInfo Culture)
    {
        return TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(GetType()).ConvertToString(null, Culture, this);
    }
}

public class PercentageConverter : TypeConverter
{
    static TypeConverter conv = TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(typeof(double));

    public override bool CanConvertFrom(ITypeDescriptorContext context, Type sourceType)
    {
        return conv.CanConvertFrom(context, sourceType);
    }

    public override bool CanConvertTo(ITypeDescriptorContext context, Type destinationType)
    {
        if (destinationType == typeof(Percentage)) {
            return true;
        }

        return conv.CanConvertTo(context, destinationType);
    }

    public override object ConvertFrom(ITypeDescriptorContext context, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture, object value)
    {
        if (value == null) {
            return new Percentage();
        }

        if (value is string) {
            string s = value as string;
            s = s.TrimEnd(' ', '\t', '\r', '\n');

            var percentage = s.EndsWith(culture.NumberFormat.PercentSymbol);
            if (percentage) {
                s = s.Substring(0, s.Length - culture.NumberFormat.PercentSymbol.Length);
            }

            double result = (double) conv.ConvertFromString(s);
            if (percentage) {
                result /= 100;
            }

            return new Percentage(result);
        }

        return new Percentage( (double) conv.ConvertFrom( context, culture, value ));
    }

    public override object ConvertTo(ITypeDescriptorContext context, CultureInfo culture, object value, Type destinationType)
    {
        if (!(value is Percentage)) {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("value");
        }

        var pct = (Percentage) value;

        if (destinationType == typeof(string)) {
            return conv.ConvertTo( context, culture, pct.Value * 100, destinationType ) + culture.NumberFormat.PercentSymbol;
        }

        return conv.ConvertTo( context, culture, pct.Value, destinationType );
    }
}
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3  
+1. IMHO it is the best answer for this question. In addition to your code, I'd also add two implicit conversion operators for a less verbose consumer code when converting to base types. One for String (static public implicit operator String(Percentage pct) { return pct.ToString(); }) and other for Decimal, since I've changed your original sample for using decimal for better precision (static public implicit operator Decimal(Percentage pct) { return pct._value; }). –  Carlos Loth Nov 1 '10 at 21:37
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Only slightly better, but less error-prone:

public static double FromPercentageString(this string value)
{
    return double.Parse(value.Replace("%","")) / 100;
}
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You might vote for this .NET Framework 4 suggestion on Microsoft Connect: Extend double.Parse to interpret Percent values

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Thanks, I just voted. –  sashaeve May 10 '11 at 15:15
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You could also combine the top two answers to avoid accepting invalid values while keeping it flexible for different cultures.

var num = double.Parse(value.TrimEnd(System.Globalization.CultureInfo.CurrentCulture.NumberFormat.PercentSymbol.ToCharArray() ) ) / 100d;
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Reflecting into .NET 4, here is Microsoft's implementation (found in System.Windows.Documents.ZoomPercentageConverter.ConvertBack). You can modify this to suit your needs. I alway's use MS's implementation when possible!

        try
        {
            string str = (string) value;
            if ((culture != null) && !string.IsNullOrEmpty(str))
            {
                str = ((string) value).Trim();
                if ((!culture.IsNeutralCulture && (str.Length > 0)) && (culture.NumberFormat != null))
                {
                    switch (culture.NumberFormat.PercentPositivePattern)
                    {
                        case 0:
                        case 1:
                            if ((str.Length - 1) == str.LastIndexOf(culture.NumberFormat.PercentSymbol, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase))
                            {
                                str = str.Substring(0, str.Length - 1);
                            }
                            break;

                        case 2:
                            if (str.IndexOf(culture.NumberFormat.PercentSymbol, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase) == 0)
                            {
                                str = str.Substring(1);
                            }
                            break;
                    }
                }
                num = Convert.ToDouble(str, culture);
                flag = true;
            }
        }
        catch (ArgumentOutOfRangeException)
        {
        }
        catch (ArgumentNullException)
        {
        }
        catch (FormatException)
        {
        }
        catch (OverflowException)
        {
        }
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It's a string, no matter what you do with it to remove the % sign you still have to parse it to a double.

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1  
-1 This isn't an answer to the question. –  C. Ross Jan 31 '10 at 12:38
    
@C.Ross, actually it is an answer and it is the correct one, if you actually bother to read the question, you would see that he doesn't "want to use this parsing approach", when it is in fact, the only approach except perhaps Convert.ToDouble which would be equivalent. –  Paul Creasey Jan 31 '10 at 12:53
    
As I understand it, the OP is referring to the particular parsing approach that he had in his post. Meaning the bit between the parentheses - not the actual use of the parse method. Even if you consider your contribution an answer unfortunately I find that it is not very helpful (-1). I suggest that instead of saying "no matter what you do with it to remove the % sign" that you expand this with different options of how to deal with the % sign. This is the crux of the OP's question and also the reason I ended up on this page. This would also help others who come here looking for answers. –  Ben Aug 10 '13 at 10:25
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