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I want to use Rebol 3 to read a file in Latin1 and convert it to UTF-8. Is there a built-in function I can use, or some external library? Where I can find it?

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Sidenote: I think in this day and age, switching your input files themselves to UTF-8 is the best idea...if the constraints of your situation allow it. This is easy to do with @earl's method below and then write it back out. So for instance, write %myfile.utf8 (latin1-to-utf8 read %myfile.latin1) Then you don't have to care about how slowly or quickly it does the conversion, because you're only doing it once... –  HostileFork Feb 12 at 5:50
    
Totally agree with you. All my files are utf8. :-) But some other's are not :-( –  giuliolunati Feb 12 at 14:32

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Rebol has an invalid-utf? function that scours a binary value for a byte that is not part of a valid UTF-8 sequence. We can just loop until we've found and replaced all of them, then convert our binary value to a string:

latin1-to-utf8: function [binary [binary!]][
    mark: :binary
    while [mark: invalid-utf? mark][
        change/part mark to char! mark/1 1
    ]
    to string! binary
]

This function modifies the original binary. We can create a new string instead that leaves the binary value intact:

latin1-to-utf8: function [binary [binary!]][
    mark: :binary
    to string! rejoin collect [
        while [mark: invalid-utf? binary][
            keep copy/part binary mark  ; keeps the portion up to the bad byte
            keep to char! mark/1        ; converts the bad byte to good bytes
            binary: next mark           ; set the series beyond the bad byte
        ]
        keep binary                     ; keep whatever is remaining
    ]
]

Bonus: here's a wee Rebmu version of the above—rebmu/args snippet #{DECAFBAD} where snippet is:

; modifying
IUgetLOAD"invalid-utf?"MaWT[MiuM][MisMtcTKm]tsA

; copying
IUgetLOAD"invalid-utf?"MaTSrjCT[wt[MiuA][kp copy/partAmKPtcFm AnxM]kpA]
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1  
Unlike the other proposed variants, this version does not return a binary!, but a string! (so technically, it only decodes Latin 1 into Unicode, but does not encode that again to UTF-8). So for true Latin-1 to UTF-8 transcoding, just leave out the to string! calls. –  earl Apr 5 at 7:38
    
Much faster than others: modifying version 9x, copying version 13x. Great @rgchris! –  giuliolunati Apr 5 at 10:16
    
@earl Guess I wasn't paying attention. As you say, in both cases it's easy enough to remove the to string! and return binary. And thanks for the link :) –  rgchris Apr 5 at 15:32

Here's a version that should be a bit faster, and at least use less memory.

latin1-to-utf8: func [
    "Transcodes a Latin-1 encoded string to UTF-8"
    bin [binary!] "Bytes of Latin-1 data"
] [
    to binary! head collect/into [
        foreach b bin [
            keep to char! b
        ]
    ] make string! length? bin
]

It takes advantage of Latin-1 characters having the same numeric values as the corresponding Unicode codepoints. If you wanted to convert from another character set for which that isn't the case, you can do a calculation on the b to remap the characters.

It uses less memory and is faster for a variety of reasons:

  • Normally, collect creates a block. We use collect/into and pass it a string as a target. Strings use less memory than blocks of integers or characters.
  • We preallocate the string to the length of the input data, which saves on reallocations.
  • We let Rebol's native code convert the characters rather than doing our own math.
  • There's less code in the loop, so it should run faster.

This method still loads the file into memory all at once, and still generates an intermediate value to store the results, but at least the intermediate value is smaller. Maybe this will let you process larger files.

If the reason you need it to be UTF-8 is that you need to process the file as a string in Rebol, just skip the to binary! and return the string as-is. Or you can just process the binary source data, just convert the bytes in the binary by using to char! on each one as you go.

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Thanks, @BrianH. –  giuliolunati Feb 13 at 20:35
    
Very neat, +1! Esp. for remembering the Latin1-to-codepoints correspondence. Also a nice example for the utility of (capped) integer! values as the elements of a binary!. –  earl Feb 14 at 3:52
    
Found that 'append is 2x faster than collect/into. See my answer. –  giuliolunati Mar 30 at 0:17

Nothing built in at the moment, sorry. Here's a straightforward implementation of Latin-1 to UTF-8 conversion which I wrote and used with Rebol 3 a while back:

latin1-to-utf8: func [
    "Transcodes a Latin-1 encoded string to UTF-8"
    bin [binary!] "Bytes of Latin-1 data"
] [
    to-binary collect [foreach b bin [keep to-char b]]
] 

Note: this code is optimised for legibility, and not in any way for performance. (From a performance perspective, it's outright stupid. You have been warned.)

Update: Incorporated @BrianH's neat "Latin-1 byte values correspond to Unicode codepoints" optimisation, which makes the above collapse to a one-liner (and mildly less stupid at the same time). Still. for a more optimised version regarding memory usage, see @BrianH's nice answer.

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@giuliolunati Note that to-binary data is a small wrapper over what I believe to be the better expression: to binary! data. By using TO directly to a datatype you realize that you could write things like to (either condition [string!] [binary!]) data. Why some people believe the exclamation point that they use all the time to specify types is too jarring and needs a wrapper eludes me, but some do. But if you are ever curious about whether something is built-in or not you can use source, e.g. source to-binary and see that it calls TO and is not a native! or action! –  HostileFork Feb 12 at 4:09
latin1-to-utf8: func [
    "Transcodes bin as a Latin-1 encoded string to UTF-8"
    bin [binary!] "Bytes of Latin-1 data"
    /local t
] [
    t: make string! length? bin
    foreach b bin [append t to char! b ]
    t
]
share|improve this answer
    
Unlike the other proposed variants, this version does not return a binary!, but a string! (so technically, it only decodes Latin 1 into in-memory Unicode, but does not encode that again to UTF-8). To fix that, you'd have to change the last line to to binary! t. –  earl Apr 5 at 7:29

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