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Considering a really huge file(maybe more than 4GB) on disk,I want to scan through this file and calculate the times of a specific binary pattern occurs.

My thought is:

  1. Use memory-mapped file(CreateFileMap or boost mapped_file) to load the file to the virtual memory.

  2. For each 100MB mapped-memory,create one thread to scan and calculate the result.

Is this feasible?Are there any better method to do so?

Update:
Memory-mapped file would be a good choice,for scaning through a 1.6GB file could be handled within 11s.

thanks.

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4  
(2) Might pattern span a 100MB boundary? If you have to write the search algorithm yourself, and the search-string is reasonably long (longer the better!), consider Boyer-Moore algorithm en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… – Kristen Jan 31 '10 at 12:24
    
@Kristen:The pattern would not span a 100MB boundary,because the pattern is bit '1'. – Jichao Feb 4 '10 at 11:38
    
What is the pattern, is it really a single set bit? – GalacticJello Feb 5 '10 at 22:08
    
Adding more threads than the PC has processors will not yield any extra benifit. Instead, it actually slows down the process due to extra overheads, just have 1 thread per CPU core and split the workload between them (maybe have a work queue so each can just do 100mb blocks at a time, which would make the queue nice and simple seeing how it could just be a single incremented number, need to use the Interlocked functions for safely incrementing it though). Also, this may be slower anyway due to the sharing of the hard disk. – Grant Peters Feb 10 '10 at 6:17
up vote 3 down vote accepted
+100

Multithreading is only going to make this go slower unless you want to scan multiple files with each on a different hard drive. Otherwise you are just going to seek.

I wrote a simple test function using memory mapped files, with a single thread a 1.4 Gb file took about 20 seconds to scan. With two threads, each taking half the file (even 1MB chunks to one thread, odd to the other), it took more than 80 seconds.

  • 1 thread: 20015 milliseconds
  • 2 threads: 83985 milliseconds

That's right, 2 threads was Four times slower than 1 thread!

Here's the code I used, this is the single threaded version, I used a 1 byte scan pattern, so the code to locate matches that straddle map boundaries is untested.

HRESULT ScanForPattern(LPCTSTR pszFilename, LPBYTE pbPattern, UINT cbPattern, LONGLONG * pcFound)
{
   HRESULT hr = S_OK;

   *pcFound = 0;
   if ( ! pbPattern || ! cbPattern)
      return E_INVALIDARG;

   //  Open the file
   //
   HANDLE hf = CreateFile(pszFilename,
                          GENERIC_READ,
                          FILE_SHARE_READ, NULL,
                          OPEN_EXISTING,
                          FILE_FLAG_SEQUENTIAL_SCAN,
                          NULL);

   if (INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE == hf)
      {
      hr = HRESULT_FROM_WIN32(ERROR_FILE_NOT_FOUND);
      // catch an open file that exists but is in use
      if (ERROR_SHARING_VIOLATION == GetLastError())
         hr = HRESULT_FROM_WIN32(ERROR_SHARING_VIOLATION);
      return hr;
      }

   // get the file length
   //
   ULARGE_INTEGER  uli;
   uli.LowPart = GetFileSize(hf, &uli.HighPart);
   LONGLONG cbFileSize = uli.QuadPart;
   if (0 == cbFileSize)
      {
      CloseHandle (hf);
      return S_OK;
      }

   const LONGLONG cbStride = 1 * 1024 * 1024; // 1 MB stride.
   LONGLONG cFound  = 0;
   LPBYTE   pbGap = (LPBYTE) malloc(cbPattern * 2);

   //  Create a mapping of the file.
   //
   HANDLE hmap = CreateFileMapping(hf, NULL, PAGE_READONLY, 0, 0, NULL);
   if (NULL != hmap)
      {
      for (LONGLONG ix = 0; ix < cbFileSize; ix += cbStride)
         {
         uli.QuadPart = ix;
         UINT cbMap = (UINT) min(cbFileSize - ix, cbStride);
         LPCBYTE pb = (LPCBYTE) MapViewOfFile(hmap, FILE_MAP_READ, uli.HighPart, uli.LowPart, cbMap);
         if ( ! pb)
            {
            hr = HRESULT_FROM_WIN32(GetLastError());
            break;
            }
         // handle pattern scanning over the gap.
         if (cbPattern > 1 && ix > 0)
            {
            CopyMemory(pbGap + cbPattern - 1, &pb[0], cbPattern - 1);
            for (UINT ii = 1; ii < cbPattern; ++ii)
               {
               if (pb[ii] == pbPattern[0] && 0 == memcmp(&pb[ii], pbPattern, cbPattern))
                  {
                  ++cFound; 
                  // advance by cbPattern-1 to avoid detecting overlapping patterns
                  }
               }
            }

         for (UINT ii = 0; ii < cbMap - cbPattern + 1; ++ii)
            {
            if (pb[ii] == pbPattern[0] && 
                ((cbPattern == 1) || 0 == memcmp(&pb[ii], pbPattern, cbPattern)))
               {
               ++cFound; 
               // advance by cbPattern-1 to avoid detecting overlapping patterns
               }
            }
         if (cbPattern > 1 && cbMap >= cbPattern)
            {
            // save end of the view in our gap buffer so we can detect map-straddling patterns
            CopyMemory(pbGap, &pb[cbMap - cbPattern + 1], cbPattern - 1);
            }
         UnmapViewOfFile(pb);
         }

      CloseHandle (hmap);
      }
   CloseHandle (hf);

   *pcFound = cFound;
   return hr;
}
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Question: Why do you use "if (pb[ii] == pbPattern[0] && 0 == memcmp(&pb[ii], pbPattern, cbPattern))"? Won't memcmp(&pb[ii], pbPattern, cbPattern) return false as soon as it compares the first bytes if those are not equal? – user561857 Jan 3 '11 at 22:23

Creating 20 threads, each supposing to handle some 100 MB of the file is likely to only worsen performance since The HD will have to read from several unrelated places at the same time.

HD performance is at its peak when it reads sequential data. So assuming your huge file is not fragmented, the best thing to do would probably be to use just one thread and read from start to end in chunks of a few (say 4) MB.

But what do I know. File systems and caches are complex. Do some testing and see what works best.

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Although you can use memory mapping, you don't have to. If you read the file sequentially in small chunks, say 1 MB each, the file will never be present in memory all at once.

If your search code is actually slower than your hard disk, you can still hand chunks off to worker threads if you like.

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I daresay that the only way that searching could be slower than reading from disk would be for truly pathological cases (e.g. searching for 999,999 A characters followed by a B in a file containing just 1,000,000 A characters) when using a naive search method (like that typically implemented for strstr()). For any linear-time string search (like Knuth-Morris-Pratt) disk I/O will be at least 100x slower. – j_random_hacker Jan 31 '10 at 12:57
2  
Yeah, that's why I wrote the "if" and "actually" in "If your search code is actually slower..." :) – Thomas Jan 31 '10 at 16:10

I would have one thread read the file (possibly as a stream) into an array and have another thread process it. I wouldnt map several at one time because of disk seeks. I would probably have a ManualResetEvent to tell my thread when the next ? bytes are ready to be processed. Assuming your process code is faster then the hdd i would have 2 buffers, one to fill and the other to process and just switch between them each time.

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I'd go with only one thread too, not only for HD performance issues, but because you might have trouble managing side effects when splitting your file : what if there's an occurrence of your pattern right where you split your file ?

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Using a memory mapped file has the additional benefit of avoiding a copy from the filesystem cache memory to the (managed) application memory if you use a read-only view (although you have to use byte* pointers then to access the memory). And instead of creating many threads use one thread to sequentially scan through the file using for example 100MB memory mapped views into the file (don't map the entire file into the process address space at once).

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I would do it with asynchronous reads into a double buffer. So when one buffer has been read from file, start reading the next buffer while scanning the first buffer. This means you do CPU and IO in parallel. Another advantage is that you will always have data around data boundaries. However I don't know if double buffering is possible with memory mapped files.

Hope this helps.

Regards,

Sebastiaan

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Tim Bray (and his readers) explored this in depth in his Wide Finder Project and Wide Finder 2. Benchmark results show that multithreaded implementations can outperform a single-threaded solution on a massive Sun multicore server. On usual PC hardware, multithreading won't gain you that much, if at all.

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