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I'm working on an API where we send the Last-Modified date header for individual resources returned from our various GETs.

When a client is making a PUT/PATCH on that resource, they can send an If-Unmodified-Since header to ensure that they are only updating the most current version of the resource.

Supporting this is kind of a pain because I want my app to respond to the following use-cases:

  • the resource you're trying to update doesn't exists (404)
  • the resource you're trying to update fails a precondition (412)
  • there was an error processing the request (500)

Is there a better way to do this with Mongo which doesn't involve making 3 separate Mongo db calls in order to capture the possible use cases and return the appropriate response?

I'd like to clean this up:

// the callback the handler is expecting from the model method below

callback(err, preconditionFailed, wasUpdatedBool)

// model method

var orders = this.db.client({ collection: 'orders' });
var query = { _id: this.db.toBSON(this.request.params.id) };

// does the order exist?
orders.findOne(query, function(err, doc) {
  if(err) {
    return callback(err);
  }

  if(!doc) {
    return callback(null, null, false);
  }

  // are you updating the most recent version of the doc?
  var ifUnModifiedSince = new Date(self.request.headers['if-unmodified-since']).getTime();

  if(ifUnModifiedSince) {
    query.lastModified = { $lte: ifUnModifiedSince };

    orders.findOne(query, function(err, doc) {
      if(err) {
        return callback(err);
      }

      if(!doc) {
        return callback(null, true);
      }

      //attempt to update
      orders.update(query, payload, function(err, result) {
        if(err) {
          return callback(err);
        }

        if(!result) {
          return callback(null, null, false);
        }

        return callback(null, null, result);
      });
    });
  }

  //attempt to update
  orders.update(query, payload, function(err, result) {
    if(err) {
      return callback(err);
    }

    if(!result) {
      return callback(null, null, false);
    }

    callback(null, null, result);
  });
});
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Supporting both a 404 and a 412 in this case will probably require multiple queries; otherwise you could just add the modified date to the query portion of the update call and return a generic error code if result does not exist (which would either be a 404 or a 412) –  jraede Feb 12 '14 at 1:15
    
That would end up making it difficult for a client to know why they got a 404 though. –  doremi Feb 12 '14 at 1:17
    
EDIT - making answer instead –  jraede Feb 12 '14 at 1:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You have too many queries, as you probably know. The general flow of this should be:

  1. Look for the document by ID - if not found, give a 404
  2. Check the presence of the if-unmodified-since header and compare it with the document's modified date. Issue 412 if applicable
  3. Update the document if allowed

So, your code should look something like this:

var orders = this.db.client({ collection: 'orders' });
    var query = { _id: this.db.toBSON(this.request.params.id) };
    orders.findOne(query, function(err, order) {
    if(err) {
        return callback(err); // Should throw a 500
    }
    if(!order) {
        return callback(404);
    }
    if(self.request.headers['if-unmodified-since']) {
        var ifUnModifiedSince = new Date(self.request.headers['if-unmodified-since']).getTime();
        if(order.lastModified.getTime() > ifUnModifiedSince) {
            return callback(412); // Should throw a 412
        }
    }
    // Now do the update
    orders.update(query, payload, function(err, result) {
        if(err) {
          return callback(err);
        }
         if(!result) {
          return callback(null, null, false);
        }
         return callback(null, null, result);
    });
});
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