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I am porting a program created in C++ from MS Studio to Ubuntu . The program works fine except when it reads from a text file .

My text file consists of lines of information seperated by the delimiter :

General Manager:G001:def
Customer:C001:def:Lim:Tom:Mr:99999999:zor@hotmail.com:Blk 145 B North #03-03 Singapore 111111

Read method

while (getline(afile,line,'\n')) //read line and store string in variable line
        {


            stringstream ss(line);
            string s;
            while (getline(ss,s,':'))
            {
                word.push_back(s);
            }


            word.clear();

        }

On Windows platform , it is stored correctly as def

However on Ubuntu platform , it is stored as def\\r

It works fine for Customer Record but gives problem for General Manager

I know it has something to do with Carriage return but I am not sure how to resolve it

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Look at this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/6089231/… –  user1781290 Feb 12 at 4:35

1 Answer 1

If the text file was created on Windows, you can use the dos2unix command to remove the extra \r's from the file. The command is simply dos2unix filenamegoeshere

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Why is it \\r and not \r –  Computernerd Feb 12 at 4:37
    
The input file will have \r, but I don't know why it gets converted to \\r. –  immibis Feb 12 at 4:54
    
Assuming the txt file name :User.txt , I am typing "dos2unix User.txt" , it doesnt work –  Computernerd Feb 12 at 5:31
    
In a command prompt, right, not in the program? Also you need to cd /path/to/file/goes/here first, sorry I forgot to say that. –  immibis Feb 12 at 5:45
    
Yea i did the above already and it still doesnt work –  Computernerd Feb 12 at 5:49

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