Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to fit data with custom equation and i am getting warning msg and it is not getting executed.. and this is my r-code..

x <- c(3, 33, 146, 227, 342, 351, 353, 444, 556, 571, 709, 759, 836, 
860, 968, 1056, 1726, 1846, 1872, 1986, 2311, 2366, 2608, 2676, 
3098, 3278, 3288, 4434, 5034, 5049, 5085, 5089, 5089, 5097, 5324, 
5389, 5565, 5623, 6080, 6380, 6477, 6740, 7192, 7447, 7644, 7837, 
7843, 7922, 8738, 10089, 10237, 10258, 10491, 10625, 10982, 11175, 
11411, 11442, 11811, 12559, 12559, 12791, 13121, 13486, 14708, 
15251, 15261, 15277, 15806, 16185, 16229, 16358, 17168, 17458, 
17758, 18287, 18568, 18728, 19556, 20567, 21012, 21308, 23063, 
24127, 25910, 26770, 27753, 28460, 28493, 29361, 30085, 32408, 
35338, 36799, 37642, 37654, 37915, 39715, 40580, 42015, 42045, 
42188, 42296, 42296, 45406, 46653, 47596, 48296, 49171, 49416, 
50145, 52042, 52489, 52875, 53321, 53443, 54433, 55381, 56463, 
56485, 56560, 57042, 62551, 62651, 62661, 63732, 64103, 64893, 
71043, 74364, 75409, 76057, 81542, 82702, 84566, 88682)

y <- c(1:136)
df <- data.frame(x,y)

fit <- nls(y ~ a*(1-exp(-x/b))^c, data=df, start = list( a=100,b=1000,c=0.5),  
     algorithm="port",lower=list(a=100,b=100,c=0.5),upper=list(a=200,b=10000,c=2))

Warning messages:

1: In min(x) : no non-missing arguments to min; returning Inf
2: In max(x) : no non-missing arguments to max; returning -Inf

How to fit this data to this custom equation and how to find r-square value..

Thanks in advance..

share|improve this question
1  
Your code works for me, no warnings. –  thelatemail Feb 12 at 5:45
    
can i change the algorithm to "plinear" .. –  Chammu Feb 12 at 5:55
    
If you believe in yourself, you can do anything. –  thelatemail Feb 12 at 5:58

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

First, to answer your question directly, R2 is not a meaningful concept for non-linear fits. For linear models, R2 is the fraction of total variability in the dataset which is explained by the model. This calculation is only valid if SST = SSR + SSE, which is true for all linear models, but is not necessarily true for non-linear models. See this question for a more complete explanation and some additional references.

So, while one can access R2 for a linear model as

rsq <- summary(lm(...))$r.squared

the summary(...) method for non-linear models does not return an R2 value.

Second, you really need to get into the habit of plotting your fitted curve against your data.

plot(x,y)
lines(x,predict(fit))

There's just no way to interpret this as a "good" fit. If we re-run the model without the constraints on a, b, and c we got a much better fit:

fit.2 <- nls(y ~ a*(1-exp(-x/b))^c, data=df, start = list( a=100,b=1000,c=0.5),  
           algorithm="port")

par(mfrow=c(1,2))
plot(x,y, main="Constrained Model",cex=0.5)
lines(x,predict(fit), col="red")
plot(x,y, main="UNconstrained Model",cex=0.5)
lines(x,predict(fit.2), col="red")

Clearly this model is "better", but that doesn't mean it's "good". Among other things, we need to look at the residuals. For a well-fit model, the residuals should not depend on x. So let's see:

plot(y,residuals(fit),main="Residuals: 1st Model")
plot(y,residuals(fit.2),main="Residuals: 2ndd Model")

The residuals in the second model are much smaller and do not follow a trend, although there does seem to be some underlying structure. This would be something to look at - it implies that there might be some low amplitude oscillation either due to a real effect, or perhaps due to the method of data collection.

Also, the underlying principle of regression modeling (the starting assumption) is that the residuals are normally distributed with constant variance (e.g., the variance does not depend on x). We can check this with a Q-Q plot, which plots quantiles of your (standardized) residuals against quantiles of N(0,1). If the residuals are normally distributed, this should be a straight line.

se <- summary(fit)$sigma
qqnorm(residuals(fit)/se, main="Q-Q Plot, 1st Model")
qqline(residuals(fit)/se,probs=c(0.25,0.75))
se.2 <- summary(fit.2)$sigma
qqnorm(residuals(fit.2)/se.2, main="Q-Q Plot, 2nd Model")
qqline(residuals(fit.2)/se.2,probs=c(0.25,0.75))

As you can see, the residuals from the 2nd model are very nearly normally distributed. IMO this, more than anything else, suggests that the second model is a "good" model.

Finally, your data looks to me like the cdf of a distribution with 2 peaks. One very simple way to model data like that is as:

y ~ a1 × ( 1 - exp( -x/b1) ) + a2 × ( 1 - exp( -x/b2) )

When I try this model it is a little better than the unconstrained version of your model.

share|improve this answer
    
least square i got..how mle(maximum likelihood estimation)method can be applied to this y~a*(1-exp(-x/b))^c equation.. basically my project is to compare output of both estimated parameters(a,b,c) through least square method and mle method for this equation for musa data sets.. –  Chammu Feb 14 at 6:39
    
The approach tells weather which method is estimates well .. either least square or Maximum likelihood estimation –  Chammu Feb 14 at 6:42

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.