Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Would the following code cause any issues?:

var a = 1;
var a = 2;

My understanding is that javascript variables are declared at the start of the scope. For example:

var foo = 'a';
foo = 'b';
var bar = 'c';

Is processed as:

var foo;
var bar;
foo = 'a';
foo = 'b';
bar = 'c';

Therefore would my initial code snippet become:

var a;
a = 1;
a = 2;

Or would it become:

var a;
var a;
a = 1;
a = 2;

I understand that declaring a javascript variable twice in the same scope isn't good practice, but I'm more interested in the impact of doing this.

share|improve this question
5  
@Pilot what? no. –  Chips_100 Feb 12 at 11:44
2  
var a,a; is the same as var a; If your are wanting to use the same variable name but have multiple values then you need to look into using arrays. –  jeff Feb 12 at 11:44
    
Check this question about variable scope. [1] –  Shanks Feb 12 at 11:44
    
@Curt Sorry for blind comment guyz –  Pilot Feb 12 at 11:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

As you said, by twice of more the same var, JavaScript moves that declaration to the top of the scope and then your code would become like this:

var a;
a = 1;
a = 2;

Therefore, it doesn't give us any error.

This same behaviour occurs to for loops (they doesn't have a local scope in their headers), so the code below is really common:

for (var i = 0; i < n; i++) {
    // ...
}
for (var i = 0; i < m; i++) {
    // ...
}

That's why JavaScript gurus like Douglas Crockford suggest programmers to manually move those declarations to the top of the scope:

var i;    // declare here
for (i = 0; i < n; i++) {    // initialize here...
    // ...
}
for (i = 0; i < m; i++) {    // ... and here
    // ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 on the for example. amazing point there –  Michel Ayres Feb 12 at 12:13
    
@Michel Thanks, glad to help. –  Danilo Valente Feb 12 at 12:14

Declaring the same variable twice is as good as declaring it once. Below statement will not bring any impact.

var a, a;

in the below case you are just overriding the variable foo. This will have an impact if you have foo defined in the local and global scope. JS will search foo in the local scope first and then if it doesn't find it will look in the global scope.

var foo;
var bar;
foo = 'a';
foo = 'b';
bar = 'c';
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.