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I'm studying python from (Exploring Python) book for Timothy A.Budd

My question is the first question in the third chapter of the book, about defining functions:

The program to convert integers into their string equivalent does not handle either negative numbers or zero correctly. This is most easily handled by creating a second function that recognizes these as special cases, and then invokes the recursive function in the general case. Write this second function. Why can’t the recursive function return “zero” when it is given the value 0?

The program to convert integers into their string equivalent is here:

def numToString (num):
    if num==0: return ''
    elif num==1: return ' one '
    elif num==2: return ' two '
    elif num==3: return ' three '
    elif num==4: return ' four '
    elif num==5: return ' five '
    elif num==6: return ' six '
    elif num==7: return ' seven '
    elif num==8: return ' eight '
    elif num==9: return ' nine '
    elif num==10: return ' ten '
    elif num==11: return ' eleven '
    elif num==12: return ' twelve '
    elif num==13: return ' therteen '
    elif num==14: return ' fourteen '
    elif num==15: return ' fifteen '
    elif num==16: return ' sixteen '
    elif num==17: return ' seventeen '
    elif num==18: return ' eighteen '
    elif num==19: return ' ninteen '
    elif num<=29: return ' twenty ' + numToString(num%10)
    elif num<=39: return ' thirty ' + numToString(num%10)
    elif num<=49: return ' fourty ' + numToString(num%10)
    elif num<=59: return ' fifty ' + numToString(num%10)
    elif num<=69: return ' sixty ' + numToString(num%10)
    elif num<=79: return ' seventy ' + numToString(num%10)
    elif num<=89: return ' eighty ' + numToString(num%10)
    elif num<=99: return ' ninty ' + numToString(num%10)
    elif num<=999: return numToString(num/100)+ ' hundred ' + numToString(num%100)
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2 Answers 2

If the function returned 'zero' for 0, then numToString(20) would return 'twenty zero', and so on.

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Yes, that's true –  user3301637 Feb 13 at 3:55

might be off topic, but you may use a dict (or list in this case) to reduce your code:

def numToString (num):
    words=[
    '', ' one ', ' two ', ' three ', ' four ', ' five ', ' six ', ' seven ', ' eight ', ' nine ',
    ' ten ', ' eleven ', ' twelve ', ' therteen ', ' fourteen ', ' fifteen ', ' sixteen ', ' seventeen ', ' eighteen ', ' ninteen ']
    if num<20: return words[num]
    elif num<=29: return ' twenty ' + numToString(num%10)
    elif num<=39: return ' thirty ' + numToString(num%10)
    elif num<=49: return ' fourty ' + numToString(num%10)
    elif num<=59: return ' fifty ' + numToString(num%10)
    elif num<=69: return ' sixty ' + numToString(num%10)
    elif num<=79: return ' seventy ' + numToString(num%10)
    elif num<=89: return ' eighty ' + numToString(num%10)
    elif num<=99: return ' ninty ' + numToString(num%10)
    elif num<=999: return numToString(num/100)+ ' hundred ' + numToString(num%100)
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GREAT! It works and seems better, Thanks –  user3301637 Feb 13 at 3:49

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