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I am trying to create a list of a base class when the objects inside are of a class which inherits my base class. I am after the quickest syntax for that.

I have the following class

public class ObjectA : BaseObject
{
    public string ObjectAName {get;set;}
}

and my method is :

    private List<BaseObject> GetList()
    {
        List<ObjectA> aList = MyData.ObjectA.FindAll(delegate(ObjectA my) { return my.ObjectAName == "Harold"; });
        List<BaseObject> baseList = new List<BaseObject>();
        foreach(ObjectA obj in aList)
        {
            baseList.Add(obj);
        }
        return baseList;
    }

Is there a more direct linq syntax ?

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2  
If you will change return type to IEnumerable<BaseObject> then you will be able to return list of ObjectA, because IEnumerable<T> is covariant –  Sergey Berezovskiy Feb 12 '14 at 13:47

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Another alternative if you are creating a new list from an existing list is to use the overloaded list constructor taking an IEnumerable:

private List<BaseObject> GetList()
{
    List<ObjectA> aList = MyData.ObjectA.FindAll(delegate(ObjectA my) { return my.ObjectAName == "Harold"; });
    List<BaseObject> baseList = new List<BaseObject>(aList.OfType<BaseObject>());

    return baseList;
}

That being said, Its unclear here why you actually need a new list rather than returning a filtered IEnumerable and removing the need for the extra memory pointers in two lists at all. That's what Yield was created for.

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Thanks for answers, there are probably more than one correct but Jim Wooley and Sergey Berezovskiy make the correct point that I should be just returning IEnumerable in cases like these. If I did that there is no need for the second collection at all. –  Frank Cannon Feb 12 '14 at 21:59

Maybe something like this.

baseList.AddRange(MyData.ObjectA.Where(o=>o.ObjectAName == "Harold"));

Alternatively you can do this

private List<BaseObject> GetList()
{
    return MyData.ObjectA.Where(o=>o.ObjectAName == "Harold").Cast<BaseObject>().ToList();
}
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How about:

private List<BaseObject> GetList()
{
    return MyData.ObjectA
        .FindAll(my => my.ObjectAName == "Harold")
        .Cast<BaseObject>()
        .ToList();
}

Note that FindAll is simply an instance method of List<T> and not part of LINQ.

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That doesn't add them to the new list. It appears to be a duplicate of .Where anyway. –  Jim Wooley Feb 12 '14 at 13:46
    
To compile this, return type should be IEnumerable<BaseObject> –  Mehmet Ataş Feb 12 '14 at 13:46
    
@MehmetAtaş: Thanks, haven't had enough coffee. Updated. –  Andrew Whitaker Feb 12 '14 at 13:50

just use AddRange

 private List<BaseObject> GetList()
            {
                List<ObjectA> aList = MyData.ObjectA.FindAll(delegate(ObjectA my) { return my.ObjectAName == "Harold"; });
                List<BaseObject> baseList = new List<BaseObject>();
                //foreach (ObjectA obj in aList)
                //{
                //    baseList.Add(obj);
                //}
                baseList.AddRange(aList);
                return baseList;
            }
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