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I don't know why, but the code below works in Firefox but NOT in Google Chrome, why ? This should be standard JS.

status = parseInt($('#input-status').val());
// status field is exactly equals to 0
if (status === 0) {
// do something, in Firefox the code reaches here, in Chrome NOT !
}

Here is how #input-status is defined in html :

<input type="hidden" id="input-status" name="input-status" value="00">

In Chrome the code works only if i replace === by == .

Any ideas ?

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5  
Do console.log(typeof status); before the if statement - what does Chrome say the type is? –  Anthony Grist Feb 12 '14 at 16:26
    
Are you sure that chrome parses successfully the string? Cause this is seems to be the problem. –  ppoliani Feb 12 '14 at 16:27
3  
2  
Don't forget to specify your radix--parseInt($("#input-status").val(), 10); –  Elliot Bonneville Feb 12 '14 at 16:32
2  
@delphirules is that really your code exactly? –  Pointy Feb 12 '14 at 16:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I'm not sure why this happens but I can reproduce it like this:

jsfiddle

status = parseInt($('#input-status').val(), 10);
test = parseInt($('#input-status').val(), 10);

console.log(typeof status); // string
console.log(typeof test); // number

I guess status is predefined by the browser and can't be parsed. To make it work use var to define a new variable in the current scope:

var status = parseInt($('#input-status').val(), 10);

if (status === 0) {
    // this also works in chrome
}

EDIT

console.log(window.status === status); // true

It seems like status is a reference to the window.status object which changes the status bar in the browser. And it does make sense that this can't be parsed into a number.

@Xotic750 pointed out:

Yes, on Chrome whenever you set the global variable status/window.status to any value window.status = {} then it converts it to a string {value: "[object Object]", writable: true, enumerable: true, configurable: true} jsfiddle lesson: don't use global variables, use var to make them locally scoped

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Great, adding 'var' solves it ! :) –  delphirules Feb 12 '14 at 16:39
    
Thank you very much ! –  delphirules Feb 12 '14 at 16:41
    
@delphirules Glad I could help you. –  enyce12 Feb 12 '14 at 16:42
2  
Yes, on Chrome whenever you set the global variable status/window.status to any value window.status = {} then it converts it to a string {value: "[object Object]", writable: true, enumerable: true, configurable: true} jsFiddle, lesson: don't use global variables, use var to make them locally scoped. –  Xotic750 Feb 12 '14 at 16:48
    
Just want to reiterate that the lesson you should take from this is: Never use implicitly defined global variables. Always use var, and don't use globals whenever possible. –  Colin DeClue Feb 12 '14 at 17:01

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