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I'm very new to Scala, but it seems like a very interesting language that I'd like to learn. Currently, I've been working on various simple applications to learn the language. From the basic syntax to networking and so on, I'm just trying to get a firm grasp on how the language and libraries work.

As of right now, I'm working a simple GUI calculator. Building the GUI is fairly simple and I have no qualms with the actual visual component of it. The problem is within the interactive portion. For some reason, I cannot figure out how to do some sort of global focus with key presses. That's probably a poor way to word it, but that's what I mean. I can't get the program to respond to my key presses except for when the program first opens. I believe the problem is with where the focus is, but I can't figure it out.

Here's my (slightly-stripped) code:

package SimplePrograms

import scala.swing._
import javax.swing.{BorderFactory, UIManager}
import scala.swing.event.{Key, KeyPressed}

/**
 * Created by Tony on 2/9/14.
 */
object SimpleCalculator {
  def main(args: Array[String]){
    UIManager.setLookAndFeel("com.sun.java.swing.plaf.nimbus.NimbusLookAndFeel")
    val calculator = new CalcGrid
    val frame = new MainFrame{
      title = "Calculator"
      contents = calculator.CalcPanel()
      listenTo()
      reactions += {
        case KeyPressed(_,Key.Numpad1,_,_)
        => calculator.numTxt.text += "1"
      }
      size = new Dimension(200,270)
      centerOnScreen()
      resizable = false
    }
    frame.open()
  }
}

class CalcGrid(){
  var numTxt = new TextField(" "){
    font = new Font("Arial",0,40)
    background = new Color(200,130,20)
    opaque = true
    border = BorderFactory.createCompoundBorder(
      BorderFactory.createLoweredBevelBorder(),
      BorderFactory.createEmptyBorder(0,5,0,5))
    editable = false
    horizontalAlignment = Alignment.Right
  }
  val btn1 = new Button("1"){
    font = new Font("Arial",0,20)
    background = new Color(200,130,20)
    preferredSize = new Dimension(40,35)
  }
  val btn2 = new Button("2"){
    font = new Font("Arial",0,20)
    background = new Color(200,130,20)
    preferredSize = new Dimension(40,35)
  }
  val btn3 = new Button("3"){
    font = new Font("Arial",0,20)
    background = new Color(200,130,20)
    preferredSize = new Dimension(40,35)
  }
  val btn4 = new Button("4"){
    font = new Font("Arial",0,20)
    background = new Color(200,130,20)
    preferredSize = new Dimension(40,35)
  }
  val btn5 = new Button("5"){
    font = new Font("Arial",0,20)
    background = new Color(200,130,20)
    preferredSize = new Dimension(40,35)
  }
  val btn6 = new Button("6"){
    font = new Font("Arial",0,20)
    background = new Color(200,130,20)
    preferredSize = new Dimension(40,35)
  }
  val btn7 = new Button("7"){
    font = new Font("Arial",0,20)
    background = new Color(200,130,20)
    preferredSize = new Dimension(40,35)
  }
  val btn8 = new Button("8"){
    font = new Font("Arial",0,20)
    background = new Color(200,130,20)
    preferredSize = new Dimension(40,35)
  }
  val btn9 = new Button("9"){
    font = new Font("Arial",0,20)
    background = new Color(200,130,20)
    preferredSize = new Dimension(40,35)
  }
  val btn0 = new Button("0"){
    font = new Font("Arial",0,20)
    background = new Color(200,130,20)
    preferredSize = new Dimension(40,35)
  }
  val btnPeriod = new Button("."){
    font = new Font("Arial",0,20)
    background = new Color(200,130,20)
    preferredSize = new Dimension(40,35)
  }
  val btnEqual = new Button("="){
    font = new Font("Arial",0,20)
    background = new Color(200,130,20)
    preferredSize = new Dimension(40,60)
  }
  val btnMinus = new Button("-"){
    font = new Font("Arial",0,20)
    background = new Color(200,130,20)
    preferredSize = new Dimension(40,35)
  }
  val btnPlus = new Button("+"){
    font = new Font("Arial",0,20)
    background = new Color(200,130,20)
    preferredSize = new Dimension(40,35)
  }

  def CalcPanel(): GridBagPanel = {
    val contents = new GridBagPanel(){
      var c = new Constraints()
      c.gridx = 0
      c.gridy = 0
      c.gridwidth = 4
      c.insets = new Insets(3,3,3,3)
      c.fill = GridBagPanel.Fill.Horizontal
      add(numTxt,c)

      c.gridwidth = 1
      c.fill = GridBagPanel.Fill.None

      c.gridx = 0
      c.gridy = 1
      add(btn7,c)

      c.gridx = 1
      c.gridy = 1
      add(btn8,c)

      c.gridx = 2
      c.gridy = 1
      add(btn9,c)

      c.gridx = 0
      c.gridy = 2
      add(btn4,c)

      c.gridx = 1
      c.gridy = 2
      add(btn5,c)

      c.gridx = 2
      c.gridy = 2
      add(btn6,c)

      c.gridx = 0
      c.gridy = 3
      add(btn1,c)

      c.gridx = 1
      c.gridy = 3
      add(btn2,c)

      c.gridx = 2
      c.gridy = 3
      add(btn3,c)

      c.gridx = 3
      c.gridy = 1
      add(btnMinus,c)

      c.gridx = 3
      c.gridy = 2
      add(btnPlus,c)

      c.gridx = 0
      c.gridy = 4
      c.gridwidth = 2
      c.fill = GridBagPanel.Fill.Horizontal
      add(btn0,c)
      c.gridwidth = 1
      c.fill = GridBagPanel.Fill.None

      c.gridx = 2
      c.gridy = 4
      add(btnPeriod,c)

      c.gridx = 3
      c.gridy = 3
      c.gridheight = 4
      c.fill = GridBagPanel.Fill.Vertical
      add(btnEqual,c)
    }
    contents
  }
}

I apologize for the sloppy code, but as I said, just whipped up something quick. Been working on this for a few days with just testing various code options and scouring the internet.

Any help?

Edit: As a quick note, I realize that the listenTo method doesn't have a parameter filled-in among a few other problems, but this was after some irritating trial-and-error moments, and I figured posting multiple versions might not be needed.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your approach is generally correct. You must use the correct publishers, however, when using the listenTo method. For example, if you write the following, you will be able to type '1' when the button with label "1" is focused:

listenTo(calculator.btn1.keys)

The key events are dispatched by the special publisher .keys and not the component itself.

So the easiest approach here would be to listen to each and every component of the calculator (all buttons, and the panel)

listenTo(calculator.btn1.keys, calculator.btn2.keys, ...)

In Swing, key events are not automatically bubbling up the component hierarchy, but will only be dispatched to the component which has the focus. There is an alternative way in (Java) Swing which is called key-bindings. For an overview see:

You can use the second approach to listen for key pressed anywhere in the active window. However, as a Scala beginner, this might be confusing, because you will have to use Java Swing instead of the Scala Swing wrapping layer. To be complete, I am showing how this would be done generally:

import javax.swing.{JComponent, KeyStroke} // Java world

val calculator = new CalcGrid
val frame = new Frame{
  title = "Calculator"
  val panel = calculator.CalcPanel()      
  contents = panel
  val act1 = Action("key1") {
    calculator.numTxt.text += "1"
  }
  // the mapping is done in your top component, so `panel`.
  // you must use the input map which is active whenever the window
  // in which the panel is located has focus:
  val imap = panel.peer.getInputMap(JComponent.WHEN_IN_FOCUSED_WINDOW)
  val amap = panel.peer.getActionMap
  // you need to map a KeyStroke to an (arbitrarily chosen) action name,
  // and that action name to the action itself.
  imap.put(KeyStroke.getKeyStroke(Key.Numpad1.id, 0), "key1")
  imap.put(KeyStroke.getKeyStroke(Key.Key1   .id, 0), "key1") // can map several keys
  amap.put("key1", act1.peer)

  size = new Dimension(200,270)
  centerOnScreen()
  resizable = false
}
frame.open()
share|improve this answer
    
What I'm getting from your post: 1. To have a "global" listener, you have to list EVERY component in the frame. 2. To make a key binding, you have to create a map that holds the input source along with a key that designates what to do. Every time an action is called, it checks what key was pressed and does the action with the associated key. I have a very general knowledge on Java usage from multiple college courses. The only issue I have is integrating it into Scala. I have no prior "cross-language" experience, so it's sort of intimidating to mix code. Thank you very much for your help! –  Stalin4Time Feb 13 at 0:37
    
@Stalin4Time yes correct. If you don't want to dive into Javax Swing, you will have to listen to every component that possibly gets focus. The alternative is to listen only to the top most component, but then you have to use the key-binding (input-map). Currently input-map functionality is not directly implemented in the Scala wrapper layer. –  0__ Feb 13 at 10:07

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