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I have a list of ordered items of type A, who each contain a subset from a list of items B. For each pair of items in A, I would like to find the number of items B that they share (intersect).

For example, if I have this data:

A1 : B1  
A2 : B1 B2 B3  
A3 : B1  

Then I would get the following result:

A1, A2 : 1  
A1, A3 : 1  
A2, A3 : 1  

The problem I'm having is making the algorithm efficient. The size of my dataset is about 8.4K items of type A. This means 8.4K choose 2 = 35275800 combinations. The algorithm I'm using is simply going through each combination pair and doing a set intersection.

The gist of what I have so far is below. I am storing the counts as a key in a map, with the value as a vector of A pairs. I'm using a graph data structure to store the data, but the only 'graph' operation I'm using is get_neighbors() which returns the B subset for an item from A. I happen to know that the elements in the graph are ordered from index 0 to 8.4K.

void get_overlap(Graph& g, map<int, vector<A_pair> >& overlap) {

map<int, vector<A_pair> >::iterator it;

EdgeList el_i, el_j;
set<int> intersect;

size_t i, j;

VertexList vl = g.vertices();

for (i = 0; i < vl.size()-1; i++) {
    el_i = g.get_neighbors(i);

    for (j = i+1; j < vl.size(); j++) {
        el_j = g.get_neighbors(j);

        set_intersection(el_i.begin(), el_i.end(), el_j.begin(), el_j.end(), inserter(intersect, intersect.begin()));
        int num_overlap = intersect.size();

        it = overlap.find(num_overlap);
        if (it == overlap.end()) {
            vector<A_pair> temp;
            temp.push_back(A_pair(i, j));
            overlap.insert(pair<int, vector<A_pair> >(num_overlap, temp));
        }
        else {
            vector<A_pair> temp = it->second;
            temp.push_back(A_pair(i, j));
            overlap[num_overlap] = temp;
        }
    }
}

}

I have been running this program for nearly 24 hours, and the ith element in the for loop has reached iteration 250 (I'm printing each i to a log file). This, of course, is a long way from 8.4K (although I know as iterations go on, the number of comparisons will shorten since j = i +1). Is there a more optimal approach?

Edit: To be clear, the goal here is ultimately to find the top k overlapped pairs.

Edit 2: Thanks to @Beta and others for pointing out optimizations. In particular, updating the map directly (instead of copying its contents and resetting the map value) drastically improved the performance. It now runs in a matter of seconds.

share|improve this question
    
What's the point of the else block? You seem to want to keep the last pair that generated a given overlap number. Why not just reverse the order, keep the first one, and save a lot of unnecessary grinding? –  Beta Feb 12 '14 at 18:07
    
The if/else block is for inserting the count for the pair in a map. So, if that count (key) does not exist in the map, I create a new list, add the pair to it, and insert into the map. Else, I retrieve the list of pairs already associated with that key, and append the pair I just generated. –  Aaron Feb 12 '14 at 18:12
    
Also, g.get_neighbors() retrieves a set of integers. I'm thinking to use presorted vectors instead. I imagine set_interaction() on vectors would be a faster operation than on sets. –  Aaron Feb 12 '14 at 18:15
3  
Oh, I see, my mistake... But... in that case, aren't you doing a lot of copying of big vectors unnecessarily? Wouldn't it be better to say it->second.push_back(A_pair(i,j))? –  Beta Feb 12 '14 at 18:17
    
I agree with Beta on this, it->second.push_back(A_pair(i,j)) seems a lot more efficient –  Martin J. Feb 12 '14 at 18:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think you may be able to make things faster by pre-computing a reverse (edge-to-vertex) map. This would allow you to avoid the set_intersection call, which performs a bunch of costly set insertions. I am missing some declarations to make fully functional code, but hopefully you will get the idea. I am assuming that EdgeList is some sort of int vector:

void get_overlap(Graph& g, map<int, vector<A_pair> >& overlap) {

map<int, vector<A_pair> >::iterator it;



EdgeList el_i, el_j;
set<int> intersect;

size_t i, j;

VertexList vl = g.vertices();

// compute reverse map
map<int, set<int>> reverseMap;
for (i = 0; i < vl.size()-1; i++) {
    el_i = g.get_neighbors(i);
    for (auto e : el_i) {
        const auto findIt = reverseMap.find(e);
        if (end(reverseMap) == findIt) {
            reverseMap.emplace(e, set<int>({i})));
        } else {
            findIt->second.insert(i);
        }
    }
}

for (i = 0; i < vl.size()-1; i++) {
    el_i = g.get_neighbors(i);

    for (j = i+1; j < vl.size(); j++) {
        el_j = g.get_neighbors(j);

        int num_overlap = 0;
        for (auto e: el_i) {
            auto findIt = reverseMap.find(e);
            if (end(reverseMap) != findIt) {
                if (findIt->second.count(j) > 0) {
                    ++num_overlap;
                }
            }
        }

        it = overlap.find(num_overlap);
        if (it == overlap.end()) {
            overlap.emplace(num_overlap, vector<A_pair>({ A_pair(i, j) }));
        }
        else {
            it->second.push_back(A_pair(i,j));
        }
    }
}

I didn't do the precise performance analysis, but inside the double loop, you replace "At most 4N comparisons" + some costly set insertions (from set_intersection) with N*log(M)*log(E) comparisons, where N is the average number of edge per vertex, and M is the average number of vertex per edge, and E is the number of edges, so it could be beneficial depending on your data set. Also, if your edge indexes are compact, then you can use a simplae vector rather than a map to represent the reverse map, which removed the log(E) performance cost.

One question, though. Since you're talking about vertices and edges, don't you have the additional constraint that edges always have 2 vertices ? This could simplify some computations.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that's an interesting idea. I'm a bit confused near the part if (findIt->second.count(j) > 0). From what I see, findIt->second is the vector<int> of A items associated with a particular B, right? Then wouldn't you use something like find() on that vector to check if j is included? –  Aaron Feb 12 '14 at 19:41
    
findIt->second is contains pretty much what you just said, except it's a set<int>, not a vector<int>, to make lookup faster. I used set<int>::count(int) rather than set<int>::find(int) because I find that it expresses the intent of a "contains ?" test better, but that's largely arbitrary. –  Martin J. Feb 13 '14 at 3:35
    
Ah, my mistake. I didn't see it was a set. Even though my program runs fast enough now (with the changes from the comments above), I'm marking this as an answer since it should, theoretically, be faster. –  Aaron Feb 13 '14 at 16:59

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