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I'm having diffuculties wrapping my head around converting a small bit of code. If I can get some guidance that would be great. The Code is currently in C, And I'm trying to Convert to C#.

typedef struct sched_pmt *sched_pmt_ptr;
typedef struct sched_pmt
{
    unsigned period_num;
    double interest;
    double principal;
    double advanced_pmt;
    double total_pmt;
    double balance;
}
sched_pmt;

I think I got sched_pmt below, but unsure how to do the pointer.

public class sched_pmt
    {
        private uint period_num { get; set; }
        double interest { get; set; }
        double principal { get; set; }
        double advanced_pmt { get; set; }
        double total_pmt { get; set; }
        double balance { get; set; }
    }

An Example of the C code in action.

sched_pmt_ptr pmtsched = NULL;

pmtsched->period_num = s++;
pmtsched->interest = pmt_int;
pmtsched->principal = prin;
pmtsched->advanced_pmt = adv_pmt;
pmtsched->total_pmt = pmt + adv_pmt;
pmtsched->balance = pv;
pmtsched++;

Can I update the structure same way in C# using pmtsched++?

share|improve this question
    
Can't you just run the code and see if you get the same results? –  Josh Engelsma Feb 12 at 18:00
    
How can i run it if I haven't Completed the pointer... Unless pointer isn't needed in C#? hence you may have answered my question –  user3276954 Feb 12 at 18:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It looks like you're using pointer arithmetic to either

  • iterate through a list of existing structs, or
  • create a new list of structs.

and that's valid C. However, though you can use pointers in C# in an unsafe context, it's very rarely necessary or a good idea. A slightly different way:

To create a collection of new sched_pmts:

List<sched_pmt> payments = new List<sched_pmt>();

for(int i = 0; i < numberToCreate; i++)
{
  sched_pmt pmt = new sched_pmt();

  pmt.period_number = s++;
  pmt.interest = pmt_int;
  pmt.principal = prin;
  pmt.advanced_pmt = adv_pmt;
  pmt.total_pmt = pmt + adv_pmt;
  pmt.balance = pv;

  payments.add(pmt);
}

Later on, to iterate through the list:

foreach(var pmt in payments)
{
  /// do something with this pmt.     
}

Or, just use a for loop. It's slightly more verbose, but also (very) slightly more efficient.

Or, if you already have the list and just want to update the objects therein,

for(int i = 0; i < payments.Count; i++)
{
      sched_pmt pmt = payments[i];

      pmt.period_number = s++;
      pmt.interest = pmt_int;
      pmt.principal = prin;
      pmt.advanced_pmt = adv_pmt;
      pmt.total_pmt = pmt + adv_pmt;
      pmt.balance = pv;  
}

Another question that comes to mind: How are you creating your initial collection that, in your example, you're attempting to iterate through by incrementing the pointer? If it's in an array, you're most likely doing it wrong.

share|improve this answer

I'd suggest you to write it in c# don't just convert it, as different languages follows different ways to do things. I mean write it in object oriented way(may not be suited for this code) but it will be helpful for extensibility, flexibility etc.

If you set your goal to get same functionality in c# rather than just converting then everything becomes easy.

btw answer to your question is yes c# supports pointers in unsafe context; you could use them if that's what you're after.

share|improve this answer

It looks like your C code is using a pointer to (unsafely) move through an array or similar data structure. If that is the case, why not just do

foreach(sched_pmt pmt in pmtList)
{
  pmt.period_num = s++;
  pmt.interest = pmt_int;
  pmt.principal = prin;
  pmt.advanced_pmt = adv_pmt;
  pmt.total_pmt = pmt + adv_pmt;
  pmt.balance = pv;
}

Even better, you could make a function that takes all your params (s, pmt_int, etc) and updates the pmt accordingly. That way you could just write

foreach(sched_pmt pmt in pmtList)
{
  pmt.Update(//params go here);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Would I create an ObservableCollection<sched_pmt> pmtlist and do pmtlist.add(pmt) each time to add to the list? Sounds like the right direction –  user3276954 Feb 12 at 18:16
    
@user3276954 why ObservableCollection<> rather than just a List<>? In what context is this being used? –  David Lively Feb 12 at 18:21
    
@user3276954 Yes, that's exactly what you would do (with any list-ish data structure). Why ObservableCollection in particular, though? –  SomeGuy Feb 12 at 18:44
    
Sorry no particular reason. Wasn't obvious to me at first but you guys are correct. I should be using a list instead. –  user3276954 Feb 12 at 19:10

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