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I have this case where the same variable is declared in both the if and the else if block. The issue is the case where the if statement is bypassed, execution moves to the else if statement, and then doesn't allow reassignment of the variable. Here is a simple example.

 if (filename.ToLower().Contains(".tif"))
 {
     int test = 0;
     string test1;
 }
 else if (ValidExtension(filename.ToLower()))
 {
     int test = 1; 
     //test still equals 0? Not possible right?
     string test1 = "hello";
     //test1 still equals null? Again not possible..?
     //EDIT:
     //Code that accesses test1 here, but test1 = null unless renamed to anything but test1...
 }

ValidExtension just checks to see if the extension of "filename" is any other image format but ".tif". It returns either true or false. If it matters this code is executing on a different thread other than the GUI thread.

Can anyone explain a possible reason for why or how this could be happening?

EDIT:

I completely understand that these are scope variables I'm well aware of Microsoft's documentation. I have done this many other times throughout my coding life and it works fine. I just have an odd case where for some reason if I go to use string test1 = "hello" in some code right beneath it, still within the Else If block, it comes back as null. My understanding of Microsoft's documentation is that line right under test1 = "hello", test1 should always = "hello" however it doesn't, it still equals null. If I ,however, change the code to test2="hello" then it is in fact "hello". My question may have been poorly worded and obviously not very clear. This isn't meant to be a noob question, I'm wondering what sort of bug this would be rather?

EDIT:

Here is the actual code that is running.. Hopefully this will give a better context to the issue..

if (filename.ToLower().Contains(".tif"))
{
    using (BaseBL.BeginImpersonate())
    {
        string output = Path.Combine(BLSettings.ClaimFilesPendingIndexingFolder, string.Format("{0}¡{1}¡{2}", "FileDrop", BaseBL.ApplicationUser, filename));
        var cpyCount = 1;
        while (File.Exists(output))
        {
            output = Path.Combine(BLSettings.ClaimFilesPendingIndexingFolder,
                                                      string.Format("{0}¡{1}¡{2}{3}.tif", "FileDrop", BaseBL.ApplicationUser, filename.Replace(".tif", string.Empty),
                                                                    cpyCount));
            cpyCount++;
        }
        var f = File.Create(output);
        f.Write(file.ToArray(), 0, int.Parse(file.Length.ToString()));
        f.Close();
        f.Dispose();
    }
}
else if (ValidExtension(filename.ToLower()))
{
    var image = new Bitmap(file);
    string output = Path.Combine(BLSettings.ClaimFilesPendingIndexingFolder, string.Format("{0}¡{1}¡{2}.tif", "FileDrop", BaseBL.ApplicationUser, Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(filename)));
    //output = null always. If changed to output1 it contains the valid filepath...??
    var cpyCount = 1;
    while (File.Exists(output))
    {
        output = Path.Combine(BLSettings.ClaimFilesPendingIndexingFolder,
                                                  string.Format("{0}¡{1}¡{2}{3}.tif", "FileDrop", BaseBL.ApplicationUser, Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(filename),
                                                                cpyCount));
        cpyCount++;
    }
    using (BaseBL.BeginImpersonate())
        image.Save(output, ImageFormat.Tiff);
    image.Dispose();
}
share|improve this question
7  
your variables are only visible in the scope {...} they are defined. –  Habib Feb 12 at 19:12
4  
Odds are you're improperly observing the program, rather than the program acting improperly. –  Servy Feb 12 at 19:13
1  
@Bathsheba Well, given that there were 4 answers all within a few minutes, and it appears to me that every single one of them mis-interpreted the question, which means the question isn't clear at all. That's an acceptable reason for downvoting it. –  Servy Feb 12 at 19:20
1  
@Bathsheba It can be both. In fact I'd say it is both in this case. –  Servy Feb 12 at 19:21
    
I think there is a sort of quantum issue here, you know, the state is unknown until you observe, and all that. How can test = 0 when OP is inside else if block? It isn't possible. The question is based on a false premise. Either it has to be run in a loop, with filename having values that both conditions meet; or the app must be run separately with different value for filename. Either way, the situation OP describes isn't possible, because of the scope of the variable declarations. –  David Khaykin Feb 12 at 19:26

3 Answers 3

I have this case where the same variable is declared in both the if and the else if block.

That's not possible - those are two different variables with the same name in different scopes. I suspect that how you're observing those variables is improper.

To be the same variables they need to be declared outside the if:

int test;
string test1;
if (filename.ToLower().Contains(".tif"))
{
    test = 0;
}
else if (ValidExtension(filename.ToLower()))
{
    test = 1; 
    test1 = "hello";
}
share|improve this answer
    
I completely agree with you, it's not possible which is why I posed the question here. In what possible world can this behavior be observed? –  agritton Feb 13 at 15:09
    
How are you observing test? In the debugger? Are you certain that the debugger is looking at the right instance? –  D Stanley Feb 13 at 15:13
    
I set a break point on test = 1; stepped over it and it sill equals 0... If I console print right underneath it, it prints 0.? –  agritton Feb 13 at 15:21

You need to declare the "test" variables before the if statements. That code looks like:

int test = 0;
string test1;
if (filename.ToLower().Contains(".tif"))
{
    test1 = null;
}
else if (ValidExtension(filename.ToLower()))
{
    test = 1;
    test1 = "hello";
}

Best of luck!

Note - The reason you have to do this is because of scope in C#. If you declare a variable in a loop, if, or (basically) any time you use curly braces - it only exists inside of that area. That means your original code actually had TWO test variables - each of them being unique.

share|improve this answer
2  
How does this explain him observing test being 0 immediately after setting it to 1? Read the code comments you copied into your own answer. –  Servy Feb 12 at 19:14

I just found this on some Microsoft page:

If you declare a variable within a block construct such as an If statement, that variable's scope is only until the end of the block. The lifetime is until the procedure ends.

From Variable and Method Scope in Microsoft .NET

enter image description here

Another link

share|improve this answer
1  
That isn't -1 worthy, just potentially not +1 worthy. -1 is for harmful answers, which this most definitely is not. It even quotes MSDN. –  Magus Feb 12 at 19:44
    
It's definitely useful. It explains exactly why the variable isn't working as expected, using the official source. –  Magus Feb 12 at 19:53
1  
Hey I'm just new here, but -1? I just take a screenshot of the MS page and all.. oh! well that's for been a newbie –  Julian Borrero Feb 12 at 19:53
    
@JulianBorrero Yeah, I apologize for that. Removed my downvote! –  admdrew Feb 12 at 19:54

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