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I was playing around today with some timing code and discovered that when asigning a string literal to std::string, that it was around 10% faster (with a short 12 char string, so likly even bigger difference for large strings) to do so with a literal of known length (using the sizeof operator) than not. (Only tested with the VC9 compiler, so I guess other compilers may do it better).

std::string a("Hello World!");
std::string b("Hello World!", sizeof("Hello World!");//10% faster in my tests

Now the reason I suspect is for a it has to call strlen (VC9 goes into assembly which isnt a strong point of mine so I cant be 100% sure) to get the string length, then do the same as the second case does anyway.

Given how long std::string has been around, and how common the first case is (especially if you include +, =, +=, etc operators and equivalent methods) in real world programs how come it doesn't optimise the first case into the second? It seems a really simple one as well to just say if it's an std::basic_string object and a literal, compile it as if it was written like b?

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How did you test it? Optimization enabled? Sure your test isn't flawed? –  Mehrdad Afshari Jan 31 '10 at 22:59
    
The test and the assumption about longer strings sounds flawed. Get ready to be hammered by Neil Butterworth. –  Seth Johnson Jan 31 '10 at 23:00
1  
It was with full optimisation, including link time generation and intrinsic functions enabled. It was the exact same piece of code in both cases, I just changed how I initialised the string from a to b then recompiled. I run it several times, so I think it highly unlikely any other factors would have impacted it so much. –  Fire Lancer Jan 31 '10 at 23:02
    
Hmm, where's the loop that you'd need to bump up execution time to something you can measure reliably? As posted, code execution would be dominated by CPU cache effects. –  Hans Passant Jan 31 '10 at 23:21
    
It was measured over a ~30 second period in each case, although the exact figures from the test are not really important IMO. Examining the assembly would be a better way to show it didn't optimise it out, but as I said that's not a strong point of mine so id never be able to find the relevant bit of the disassembly, and have even less chance of proving what it is or isnt doing. –  Fire Lancer Jan 31 '10 at 23:26

2 Answers 2

The first can't be optimised into the second. In the first, the length of the string is unknown and so has to be calculated, in the second you tell it how long it is, so no calculation is needed.

And using sizeof() makes no difference - that is calculated at compile time too. The constructor that the first case uses is:

 string( const char * s );

there is no way of this constructor detecting it is being given a string literal, much less calculating its length at compile time.

Also, constructing strings from C-style string literals happens relatively rarely in real code - it simply isn't worth optimising. And if you do need to optimise it, simply re-write:

while( BIGLOOP ) {
   string s( "foobar" );
   ...
}

as:

string f( "foobar" );
while( BIGLOOP ) {
   string s( f );
   ...
}
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3  
The compiler should be able to figure out the length of the string at compile time in the same way it can figure out sizeof(...) since the string is constant –  Greg Jan 31 '10 at 23:03
3  
I think his point is valid, in the first case, the compiler does know how long the string literal is. If you don't already know how std::string and the compiler work, there is no way to know that the compiler can't make use of its knowledge about the size of the literal. –  John Knoeller Jan 31 '10 at 23:07
3  
Well, the compiler could. But it would take a lot of effort on the part of the compiler writers and would bind the compiler tightly to the library - I suppose the compiler writers didn't think it was worth it, correctly IMHO . –  anon Jan 31 '10 at 23:22
1  
The compiler certainly could, it would just have to extend the standard to do so. String constants can't be templates, so you can't just make a templated constructor. Default arguments can't rely on other arguments so you can't sneak a call to strlen() in. In C++0x you could perhaps have a literal class containing the string length, but there would be no way to construct it from a normal string literal. This is genuinely a failure at the language level, although not a serious one. –  Potatoswatter Feb 1 '10 at 3:12
2  
This extension will indeed cause "incorrect" behavior for std::string("a\0b"). –  MSalters Feb 1 '10 at 12:55

The compiler undoubtedly could do something like this, and actually you could do this yourself:

template<size_t SIZE>
std::string f(const char(&c)[SIZE]) {
    return std::string(c, SIZE);
}

int main() {
    std::string s = f("Hello");
    cout << s;
}

or even with a custom derived type (though there is no reason std::string couldn't have this constructor):

class mystring : public string {
public:
    template<size_t SIZE>
    mystring(const char(&c)[SIZE]) : string(c, SIZE) {}
};

int main() {
    mystring s("Hello");
    cout << s;
}

One large drawback is that a version of the function/constructor is generated for every different string size, and the whole class could even be duplicated if the compiler doesn't handle template hoisting very well... These could be deal-breakers in some situations.

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SIZE should be size_t, not int. We can't have a string of -1 length. –  Chris Lutz Feb 1 '10 at 3:33
    
If you insist! I didn't realize I had -pedantic turned on :) –  joshperry Feb 1 '10 at 3:39
    
@joshperry - I always have -pendantic turned on. :P –  Chris Lutz Feb 1 '10 at 3:40
    
D'oh! I forgot that string literals are arrays. §2.13.4/1: "string literal has type “array of n const char”" Erasing my answer… –  Potatoswatter Feb 1 '10 at 4:06
    
Looks unlikely that the compiler will generate additional code for this. Remember that functions declared inside class{} are inline, and you're not declaring a new specialization of string so string methods will not be duplicated. This should be zero-overhead on most platforms. –  Potatoswatter Feb 1 '10 at 4:10

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