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See title.

I have:

class Foo {
   private:
     Foo();
   public:
     static Foo* create();
}

What need I do from here to make Foo un-copyable?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
up vote 62 down vote accepted
class Foo {
   private:
     Foo();
     Foo( const Foo& other ); // non construction-copyable
     Foo& operator=( const Foo& ); // non copyable
   public:
     static Foo* create();
}

If you're using boost, you can also inherit from noncopyable : http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_41_0/boost/noncopyable.hpp

EDIT: C++11 version if you have a compiler supporting this feature:

class Foo {
   private:
     Foo();
     Foo( const Foo& other ) = delete; // non construction-copyable
     Foo& operator=( const Foo& ) = delete; // non copyable
   public:
     static Foo* create();
}
share|improve this answer
1  
As a matter of interest, why have you made the default constructor private, and added a create() method? What advantages does this layout have? – user3728501 Jul 4 '13 at 12:51
    
@EdwardBird I was just using the question example. This way of doing is basically like forcing construction of a particular type's instances through a factory. This is useful if the constructor should do basic setup and some other operations (maybe different depending on the context or platform or whatever) have to be done before providing the object, or even before creating the object (maybe some memory pool manipulation). I would have used a unique_ptr or shared_ptr as create() return type personally. Anyway the main reason was just fixing the question example. – Klaim Jul 4 '13 at 13:19
    
Ah, thanks, that is a good thing to be aware of. – user3728501 Jul 4 '13 at 13:25
2  
Disabling copy construction and copy assignment operator disables move construction and assignment as well. Move operations will still function by falling back to copying. Re-enable them by explicitly setting them to 'default'. Something to be aware of. – Ash Jul 7 '15 at 20:51
    
@Ash - important catch, but how move will fallback to copy if copy is already deleted? – Nick Sep 26 '15 at 7:25

Make the copy constructor and the assignment operator private as well. Just the declaration is enough, you don't have to provide an implementation.

share|improve this answer
10  
And you shouldn't provide an implementation. – Roger Pate Sep 27 '10 at 13:51

Just another way to disallow copy constructor,For convenience, a DISALLOW_COPY_AND_ASSIGN macro can be used:

// A macro to disallow the copy constructor and operator= functions
// This should be used in the private: declarations for a class
#define DISALLOW_COPY_AND_ASSIGN(TypeName) \
  TypeName(const TypeName&);               \
  void operator=(const TypeName&)

Then, in class Foo:

class Foo {
 public:
  Foo(int f);
  ~Foo();

 private:
  DISALLOW_COPY_AND_ASSIGN(Foo);
};

ref from google style sheet

share|improve this answer
1  
Your solution doesn't work as-is with some compilers. Some C++ compilers require that if you declare a class member function then you must also define it, even if it's never used in code. So you need to use {} with the two function declarations above. – ThreeBit Jan 31 '13 at 20:19
    
@ThreeBit, If you mean constructor with one param and destructor by saying "two function", these are decleration and programmer already knows that these will have definition in somewhere else. Other than that, it is same as accepted answer. – Fredrick Gauss May 2 '15 at 15:53
#include <boost/utility.hpp>
class Foo : boost::noncopyable {...

But as Scott Meyers once said..."It's a fine class, it's just that I find the name a bit un, err non natural", or something like that.

share|improve this answer
    
Any link to the context of the quote? – GManNickG Feb 1 '10 at 0:00
    
it was either in effective c++ or more effective c++, a book. – Chris H Feb 1 '10 at 6:17
2  
Reference: Effective C++ (Third Edition) - Scott Meyers, Item 6 – Thirler Mar 7 '13 at 10:57

To add a bit there.

The traditional solution is, as has been said, to declare both Copy Constructor and Assignment Operator as private, and not to define them.

  • Because they are private, this will lead to a compile-time error from anyone trying to use them that has not access to the private parts of the class...
  • Which leaves friends (and the class itself) for which the error will occur under the form of undefined symbol, either at link-time (if you check for those there) or most probably at run-time (when trying to load the library).

Of course, it is quite a bother in the second case because you then have to check your code by yourself since you do not have the indication of the file and line at which the error occurs. Fortunately it's limited to your class methods and friends.


Also, it is worth noting that these properties are transitive down the inheritance and composition road: the compiler will only generate default versions of the Default Constructor, the Copy Constructor, the Assignment Operator and the Destructor if it may.

This means that for any of those four, they are automatically generated only if they are accessible for all the bases and attributes of the class.

// What does boost::noncopyable looks like >
class Uncopyable {
public:
  Uncopyable() {}

private:
  Uncopyable(const Uncopyable&);
  Uncopyable& operator=(const Uncopyable&);
};

This is why inheriting from this class (or using it as an attribute) will effectively prevents your own class to be copyable or assignable unless you define those operators yourself.

Generally inheritance is chosen over composition there for 2 reasons:

  • The object is effectively Uncopyable, even if polymorphism may not be that useful
  • Inheritance leads to EBO or Empty Base Optimization, while an attribute will be addressable and thus will occupy memory (in each instance of the class) even if it does not actually need it, the compiler has the possibility not to add this overhead for a base class.

You could, alternatively, declare the operators private and not define them in your own class, but the code would be less self-documenting, and you would not be able to automatically search for those class that have this property then (unless you have a full-blown parser).

Hope this shed some light on the mechanism.

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1  
+1. Good answer. – zeboidlund Feb 16 '13 at 7:18
    
@chappjc: And you think right! Oops... :D – Matthieu M. May 20 '15 at 18:03
    
BTW, isn't Uncopyable incomplete without explicitly defining the constructor since it won't be automatically generated on account of the presence of the other constructors? For example, you get "no appropriate default constructor available" with this: rextester.com/SFWR22041 Thanks for your helpful answer! I especially appreciate the motivation you've given for using inheritance. – chappjc May 20 '15 at 18:38
    
@chappjc: And you are right again, I really should have compiled the code. – Matthieu M. May 21 '15 at 10:27

In C++11, you can explicitly disable the creation of default copy and assignment constructor by placing = delete after the declaration.

From Wikipedia:

struct NonCopyable {
    NonCopyable() = default;
    NonCopyable(const NonCopyable&) = delete;
    NonCopyable & operator=(const NonCopyable&) = delete;
};

The same goes for classes of course.

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The typical way to make a C++ object non-copyable is to explicitly declare a copy constructor and copy-assignment operator but not implement them. This will prevent the compiler from generating its own. (Typically this is done in conjunction with declaring them private so that it generates a compilation error instead of a linker error.)

There also is the boost::noncopyable class that you can inherit from, which does what I described above.

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Make the copy constructor private.

Foo(const Foo& src);

You don't need to implement it, just declare it in the header file.

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This is what I use:

/* Utility classes */

struct NoCopy
{
public:
    NoCopy() {}
private:
    NoCopy(const NoCopy &);
};

struct NoAssign
{
private:
    NoAssign &operator=(const NoAssign &);
};

struct NonInstantiable
{
private:
    NonInstantiable();
};

struct NoCopyAssign : NoCopy, NoAssign
{
};
typedef NoCopyAssign NoAssignCopy;

In your case:

struct Example : NoCopy
{
};
share|improve this answer
2  
Note that inheriting from utility classes like this can adversely affect class size, depending on architecture ABI. See trac.webkit.org/changeset/68414 for details. Granted, that changeset only mentions Itanic, and nothing else -- but is it worth relying on no other architectures ever doing this? Maybe. It's a definite risk, and declaring a private constructor and assignment operator works equally well. – Jeff Walden Dec 16 '11 at 17:49

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