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Ok, in regards to the quote below I have the following question in bold text:

The FD_WRITE network event is handled slightly differently. An FD_WRITE network event is recorded when a socket is first connected with a call to the connect, ConnectEx, WSAConnect, WSAConnectByList, or WSAConnectByName function or when a socket is accepted with accept, AcceptEx, or WSAAccept function and then after a send fails with WSAEWOULDBLOCK and buffer space becomes available. Therefore, an application can assume that sends are possible starting from the first FD_WRITE network event setting and lasting until a send returns WSAEWOULDBLOCK. After such a failure the application will find out that sends are again possible when an FD_WRITE network event is recorded and the associated event object is set.

So a FD_WRITE is generated when connections are established/accepted or send() fails with WSAWOULDBLOCK after the buffer becomes free again.

How would you design a program to use such an event? My approach would be in the following pseudocode - I'd like to know if I'm going about it the right way:

Call a function
send
if returns WSAWOULDBLOCK
save state of pointers and buffers globally
end function
..
.. //message loop
..
FD_WRITE event!
resume last state of the buffer/send to corresponding socket.
continue sending.

Is there perhaps a better existing pattern or...? Thank you.

EDIT: Just thought up of another idea:

Create a queue of "workload"
push data in the queue
if FD_WRITE generated already & sending later - manually signal FD_WRITE to get inside routine
FD_WRITE routine will process sending in queue
if WSAWOULDBLOCK, save queue position & return
..
.. //event loop
..
FD_WRITE event!
continue sending from queue.
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

How would you design a program to use such an event?

Create a buffer for all of your outgoing data.

Whenever you need to send data, check the buffer first. If the buffer has any unsent data in it, append all of the new data to the end of the buffer for later re-sending. Otherwise, attempt to send as much of the data over the socket as you can, and if WSAEWOULDBLOCK is reported then stop sending and append the remaining unsent portion of data to the end of the buffer for later re-sending.

Whenever you receive an FD_WRITE event, check the buffer. If it is not empty, send as much of the buffered data over the socket as you can, removing whatever portion of data is successfully sent, and if WSAEWOULDBLOCK is reported then stop sending and leave the remaining unsent data in the buffer for later re-sending.

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Oh I see now, that explains it perfectly. Many thanks! –  Andy Carter Feb 14 at 12:35

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