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I'm thinking about Mutexes and I need some clarification about them. Should I try to open existing Mutex or create new one (of course both with the same name). Example of code:

First attempt - try open existing one:

private void AttemptOne()
{
    Mutex myMutex;
    if (!Mutex.TryOpenExisting("Mutex Name", out myMutex))
        myMutex = new Mutex(false, "Mutex Name");
    try
    {
        myMutex.WaitOne(3000);
        // code
    }
    catch { }
    finally
    {
        myMutex.ReleaseMutex();
        // myMutex.Dispose(); - should I call that or it will be called automatically when returning from method?
    }
}

Second attempt - create new Mutex:

private void AttemptTwo()
{
    using (Mutex mutex = new Mutex(false, "Mutex Name"))
    {
        try
        {
            mutex.WaitOne(3000);
            // code
        }
        catch { }
        finally { myMutex.ReleaseMutex(); }
    }
}

I have some questions, which bother me:

  • which attempt to use?

    Let assume that I have a background process with created Mutex, and at the same time Main process tries to do some work, which should be blocked until backgorund process finishes. If background process created its own Mutex, should I try to open it?

    Or create new Mutex in Main thread with the same name?

    What is the difference between those attempts?

  • should I call Dispose() in first Attempt?

    Or just assume that Mutex will be disposed when method returns? Will it be disposed then?

  • I assume that in second attempt Mutex will be Disposed (as its IDisposable) when using() ends. Am I right?
share|improve this question
2  
The first one is racy. Can't use that one. – usr Feb 12 '14 at 21:48
    
@usr Can you explain it a little? – Romasz Feb 12 '14 at 22:00
1  
I think after TryOpenExisting has completed the mutex could have appeared in the meantime. The check is inherently racy. A return value of false does not mean the mutex does not exist. – usr Feb 12 '14 at 22:04
1  
You only need (want) a Mutex for communication between processes or AppDomains. For simple threading there are lighter alternatives. – Henk Holterman Feb 12 '14 at 22:13
    
@HenkHolterman Yes you are right. From the very beginning I thought about processes, but I wrote thread - my apologies. – Romasz Feb 13 '14 at 7:02
up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you're planning to create the mutex if it doesn't exist anyway, then just go ahead and use the second method. If you're going for a different behavior based on the existence of the mutex, then you should use TryOpenExisting to check if it exists.

As for your other questions: Yes, you should call the Dispose or Close method on the mutex when you're done with it. In order to allow the operating system to destroy it once it's not in use.

Yes, using would call the Mutex object Dispose method.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for help. I had some further doubts, but I was able to figure them out myself. – Romasz Feb 13 '14 at 10:58

I think you shouldn't use named mutex to synchronize threads in a single process. It's better to share a mutex (or semaphore) object between this threads (in a local variable or in a class field for example). So use named mutex to make process synchronization(for example running only one copy of the application).

About your questions. TryOpenExisting() represent a common pattern TryXxx and provide you opportunity to check the result of an operation without exceptions. Although there are some constructor overloads that have out createdNew boolean parameter you must declare another variable for this what is ugly. Your second variant means that you don't care about whether you have existing mutex or just create a new.

Calling Dispose() (or put the object into using) is always usefull practice. If you use named mutex like in your code all will be fine after disposing. But if you dispose a shared mutex variable (like I advice) in one thread all other threads which waits this mutex will fall with an exception. In this case you should dispose mutex only when you realy sure that you have no needs in it.

As you can see answers on your questions depends on the specific situation.

share|improve this answer
    
You are right, I thought about processes but wrote threads. My apologise. (I've edited my question thread = proces) – Romasz Feb 13 '14 at 7:09

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