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Requirements:

a) I have a very large CSV file to read (about 3Gb).

b) I won't need all records, I mean, there are some conditionals that we can use, for example, if the 3rd CSV column content has 'XXXX' and 4th column has '999'. Can I use these conditionals to improve the read process? If so, how can I do that using Perl?

Please you should show an example (Perl Script) in your answer.

Thanks in advance.

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8  
Note that all the answers use a while loop and not a for loop. This is very important. while operates in a scalar context and will only get one line at a time. for operates in a list context, and will lead to the entire file being read into memory before any processing begins. –  daotoad Feb 1 '10 at 5:06
4  
-1 for "I'm not going to tell you what I've tried or give any sign that I've made an effort to do this myself, but all answers are expected to include working code" –  Dave Sherohman Feb 1 '10 at 11:06

5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Here's a solution:

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use warnings;
use strict;
use Text::CSV_XS;
use autodie;
my $csv = Text::CSV_XS->new();
open my $FH, "<", "file.txt";
while (<$FH>) {
    $csv->parse($_);
    my @fields = $csv->fields;
    next unless $fields[1] =~ /something I want/;
    # do the stuff to the fields you want here
}
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2  
Missing part of your dereference operator in the call to parse. And, the regex is malformed, but other than that great example. –  Evan Carroll Feb 1 '10 at 1:04

Use Text::CSV

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for a really big file like this you should be using Text::CSV_XS –  singingfish Feb 1 '10 at 1:00
6  
it will use ::_XS if it is present on your system. –  Evan Carroll Feb 1 '10 at 1:42
    
in other words: XS modules typically provide better memory and/or CPU performance than pure Perl modules, which would be helpful with large files such as the one you described. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/XS_%28Perl%29 –  Christopher Bottoms Feb 1 '10 at 19:04

Your a) question has been answered a few times over already, but b) has not yet been addressed:

I won't need all records, I mean, there are some conditionals that we can use, for example, if the 3rd CSV column content has 'XXXX' and 4th column has '999'. Can I use these conditionals to improve the read process?

No. How would you know whether the 3rd CSV column contains 'XXXX' or the 4th is '999' without reading the line first? (DBD::CSV lets you hide this behind an SQL WHILE clause, but, because CSV is unindexed data, it still needs to read in every line to determine which match the condition(s) and which don't.)

Pretty much the only way the content of a line could be used to let you skip reading parts of the file is if it contained information telling you 1) "skip the section following this line" and 2) "continue reading at byte offset nnn".

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Yeah, that's true. Thanks. –  André Diniz Feb 1 '10 at 14:48

The Text::CSV module is a great solution for this. Another option is the DBD::CSV module, which provides a slightly different interface. The DBI interface is really useful if you're developing applications that have to access data from different forms of databases, including relational databases and comma-separated text files.

Here's some example code:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use DBI;

$dbh = DBI->connect ("DBI:CSV:f_dir=/home/joe/csvdb") 
    or die "Cannot connect: $DBI::errstr";

$sth = $dbh->prepare ("SELECT id, name FROM info.txt WHERE id > 1 ORDER by id");
$sth->execute;

my ($id,$name);
$sth->bind_columns (\$id, \$name);
while ($sth->fetch) {
    print "Found result row: id = $id, name = $name\n";
}
$sth->finish;

I'd use Text::CSV for this task unless you're planning on talking to other types of databases, but in Perl TIMTOWDI and it helps to know your options.

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Doesn't DBD::CSV load the whole file into memory? –  reinierpost Apr 26 '12 at 9:40

use a module like Text::CSV, however, if you know that your data will not have embedded commas and its simple CSV format, then a simple while loop to iterate the file will suffice

while (<>){
  chomp;
  @s = split /,/;
  if ( $s[2] eq "XXXX" && $s[3] eq "999" ){
    # do something;
  } 
}
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