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I'm using numpy to get the eigenvalues/eigenvectors of a matrix. My matrix is symmetric and positive.

> mat

  matrix([[ 1.,  1.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
          [ 1.,  2.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
          [ 0.,  0.,  1.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
          [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  2.,  1.,  1.,  0.],
          [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  1.,  2.,  1.,  0.],
          [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  0.],
          [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  1.]])

I use np.eigh because my matrix is symmetric.

> import numpy.linalg as la
> la.eigh(mat)

  (array([ 0.27,  0.38,  1.  ,  1.  ,  1.  ,  2.62,  3.73]),
   matrix([[ 0.  , -0.85, -0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.53,  0.  ],
          [ 0.  ,  0.53, -0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.85,  0.  ],
          [ 0.  ,  0.  , -0.  ,  1.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ],
          [-0.33, -0.  , -0.71, -0.  , -0.  , -0.  , -0.63],
          [-0.33, -0.  ,  0.71, -0.  , -0.  , -0.  , -0.63],
          [ 0.89, -0.  , -0.  , -0.  , -0.  , -0.  , -0.46],
          [-0.  , -0.  , -0.  , -0.  ,  1.  , -0.  , -0.  ]]))

My problem is that many of these values have the wrong sign. In particular, the principal eigenvector (the column farthest to the right in the matrix) is all negative when it should be positive. I have checked this against both matlab and octave. Is this just a precision error, or is there something I'm missing?

If it is an error, is there some way to check for such an error and correct it?

EDIT: This calculation is part of Hubs and Authorities and the matrix above is A*A^T. It is a result of the original paper (see p.9, p.10) that the hub scores converge to the principal eigenvector of A*A^T. Ultimately, we want to compare these hub scores against each other, so the sign is actually important.

On page 10, the paper also says, "Also (as a corollary), if M has only non-negative entries, then the principal eigenvector of M has only non-negative entries." This is why I asked the question.

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3  
The results are correct. Sign of an eigenvector is not defined, and is arbitrary. – pv. Feb 12 '14 at 22:50
    
Neither of those references contradict the fact that the sign of an eigenvector is not defined. You can of course fix a phase convention if your problem requires it, but this is usually not done (because problems vary). – pv. Feb 13 '14 at 18:05
up vote 7 down vote accepted

The sign of an eigenvector is arbitrary. As far as I know, there is not a right or wrong answer in that regard.

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Thanks, Mike. I actually care about the sign of the eigenvectors - I edited my original question. – mayhewsw Feb 13 '14 at 17:55
1  
It looks like the author was sloppy. He should have said, "Also (as a corollary), if M has only non-negative entries, then there exists a principal eigenvector of M which has only non-negative entries." (or something phrased clearer), which is what the Perron–Frobenius theorem actually says. – Mike Graham Feb 13 '14 at 18:30
1  
To get the sign you need, feel free to flip the sign on the whole vector. – Mike Graham Feb 13 '14 at 18:31
    
Yes, the Perron-Frobenius theorem is what I was also looking at. It's clear that the iterative method described in the paper gives only non-negative results, but is not true in general. My question now is, can I be sure that all elements of the principal eigenvector have the same sign? This is more math than numpy though. – mayhewsw Feb 13 '14 at 18:37
    
Something like eigvals, eigvecs = la.eigh(mat) principal = eigvecs[:, eigvals.argmax()] if (principal >= 0).all() or (pricipal <= 0).all(): print 'all the same'? (Not ran/tested/etc. Also, might run into numerical issues where -0.000000000218 should be counted as 0). Probably easier to text mat in the first place.) – Mike Graham Feb 13 '14 at 18:56

You can easily check that the eigendecomposition of your symmetric matrix MM is correct, if you exploit MM == QQ*DD*QQ.T, with DD=diag([lam_1, lam2_,...]) being a matrix with the eigenvalues on the diagonal and QQ being the matrix of eigenvectors:

lam,QQ = la.eigh(MM)

# Check result:
DD = np.diag(lam)
MM2 = np.dot(np.dot(QQ, DD), QQ.T)
print(MM-MM2)  # should be zero

which is in your case correct to 14 digits.

Note that eigenvectors may by multiplied by any constant, because of the defining equation of eigenvalues MM*x == lambda*x <=> MM*(c*x) == lambda *(c*x) with c being any non-zero constant. c depends on the numerics - Numpy just normalized the vector to one.

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