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Help me understand what is wrong with my code please.

So what I have to do is to call an async call to get a count. I have made that into a promise.

function getCount(client) {
    var xml = "<urn:mgmtISCSIGetTargetList> </urn:mgmtISCSIGetTargetList>";
    client.MgmtServer.MgmtServer.mgmtISCSIGetTargetList(xml, function (err, result) {

        if (err) {
            logger.error(err);
            debug(err);
            return deferred.reject(err);
        }
            deferred.resolve(parseInt(result.list.targetCount));
        }
    });

    return deferred.promise;
};

once I get the count using the above promise, I need to make more async calls, as many as the return of the first promise.

The code that suppose to do the later is another promise. That code is:

function az(client, index) {
  var xml = "<urn:mgmtISCSIGetTargetList> </urn:mgmtISCSIGetTargetList>";
    client.MgmtServer.MgmtServer.mgmtISCSIGetTargetList(xml, function (err, result) {

            if (err) {
                return deferred.reject(err);
            }

            var i;
            for (i = 0; i < index; i++) {
                if (1 === i) {
                    console.log('index 1 is bad news');
                    return deferred.reject("Blew up");
                }
            }

            console.log('after the loop');
            deferred.resolve(index);
        }
    );
    return deferred.promise;
};

Just for testing purposes, I hard coded for index of 1 reject the promise. When I put the promises together, I am not seeing what I expect. The code is:

getCount(client).then(
    function (count) {
        return az(client, count).then(console.log);
    }
).catch(
    function (err) {
        console.log('caught an error from outer promise');
        console.log(err);
    }
);

the output I get is:

3 which is from deferred.resolve(index);
index 1 is bad news which is hard coded failure.

I know this is a long post, but anyone sees what I am doing wrong in chaining these 2 promises together?

I changed az to read as:

function az(client, index) {
    var xml = "<urn:mgmtISCSIGetTargetList> </urn:mgmtISCSIGetTargetList>";
    client.MgmtServer.MgmtServer.mgmtISCSIGetTargetList(xml, function (err, result) {

            if (err) {
                return deferred.reject(err);
            }

            if (1 === index) {
                console.log('index 1 is bad news');
                return deferred.reject("Blew up");
            }

            console.log('after the loop with index ' + index);
            deferred.resolve(index + 30);
        }
    );
    return deferred.promise;
};
share|improve this question
    
Where do you construct the deferred variable? –  Bergi Feb 13 at 0:42
    
What promise library are you using? –  Bergi Feb 13 at 0:51
    
var deffered = require('Q).deferred and I use Q package and deferred –  reza Feb 13 at 2:41
    
What output did you expect? What does not work? –  Bergi Feb 13 at 2:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can resolve (fulfill/reject) a promise only once. That you have return deferred.reject("Blew up"); inside a loop looks much like a design smell, or wrong understanding.

I need to make more async calls, as many as the return of the first promise. The code that suppose to do the later is another promise

Every async task should have its own promise. What I had expected from that description was

getCount(client).then(function (count) {
    for (var i=0; i<count; i++)
        az(client, i).then(console.log);
})

Now you will have a promise returned from each az call, so you would have an array of promises that are executing in parallel. If you need to wait for all of them to continue with all their results together, you will need to compose them to a new promise. The Q library does have a helper function for that, named Q.all. You can use it like this:

getCount(client).then(function (count) {
    var promises = [];
    for (var i=0; i<count; i++)
        promises.push(az(client, i));
    return Q.all(promises);
}).then(function(results) {
    console.log("everything went right. All results:", results);
}, function(err) {
    console.log("something (either getCount, or one of the az calls) blew up", err);
});
share|improve this answer
    
What I am trying to do is if any of the items in the loop have issues to throw and exception. Is deferred.reject not the correct way to do that? –  reza Feb 13 at 2:44
    
Yes, it is, but you seem to have mis-placed the loop. Or does that mgmtISCSIGetTargetList method return all the items at once, and you don't even need multiple calls to it? –  Bergi Feb 13 at 2:53
    
i have misplaced the loop. has to be. mgmtISCSIGetTargetList return one item at a time –  reza Feb 13 at 4:17
    
Glad to hear my guess was right :-) So does it work when az() does produce a promise for a single value? –  Bergi Feb 13 at 4:26
    
no it does not... here what I have now. I use the code you submitted for the array as is and I changed the az to read: as I added above and I see output: everything went right. All results: [ 3, 3, 3 ] after the loop with index 0 index 1 is bad news after the loop with index 2 out of order and never see the "something went wrong error. I will add the az code as I have it. –  reza Feb 13 at 17:17

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