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I have a simple relation between a User model and a Role model.

public class User {
{
    public User() {
         Roles = new HahSet<Role>();
    }

    [DatabaseGenerated(DatabaseGeneratedOption.Identity)]
    public int Id { get; set; }

    public virtual ICollection<Role> Roles { get; set; }
}

public class Role { 

    public Role()
    {
        Users = new HashSet<User>();
    }

    [DatabaseGenerated(DatabaseGeneratedOption.Identity)]
    public int Id { get; set; }

    public virtual ICollection<User> Users { get; set; }
}

On my development system, when querying user.Roles, I get the intended result of 3 Roles. When deployed to a test environment, the same query returns 0 Roles.

I have logged and monitored both environments. Both systems

  • Run the same code base and record the same logging statements
  • Execute the same SQL queries against an identical database (via both logging and SQL Profiler), so I can see it requesting the data from the database
  • Have the required database records
  • Are able to load User, but the test environment does not turn the Roles into objects on the user.Roles collection
  • Edit: Running the SQL queries manually on both development and testing databases return the expected results.

As far as I can, my environment and configs are identical.

My question is, what sort of environmental and/or configuration areas can I investigate to work out what is happening in the test environment?

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1 Answer 1

To be on the safe side can you just verify the two objects.. They have to look something like this...

public class User {
{
    public User() {
         Roles = new HahSet<Role>();
    }
    [Key]
    public int UserId { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<Role> Roles { get; set; }
}

public class Role
{
[Key]
public int RoleId { get; set; }
[ForeignKey("User ")]
public int UserId { get; set; }
public User User { get; set; }
}
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I've added the code - this is an EF Code First project and I've mainly used implicit foreign keys and identifiers, so what you are seeing is pretty much the design. I've not included fields that irrelevant to the relationship (roleName, userName, etc). –  Jason Feb 13 at 5:41
    
I think there is an issue here.. you seems to have one user with many roles and one role with many users.. this mean that go to have a composite table in between to handle the many to many relationship..Ideally you got to have another object and a table called UserRole where it share the UserId and the RoleId.. then again you have not marked the Id with the key attribute. When naming key the recommended default method is to name the key with the table name sufix that is proimary key of the table Role has to be RoleId, same goes with user too.. –  Nirosh Feb 13 at 5:45
    
I should point out that I am using EF Code First migrations. The database is built and named from the specified relationships, and with objects that relate to each other in 1-* fashion, the table in between is automatically created. In any case, this works in a development environment, and the migrations create the database correctly in the test environment. –  Jason Feb 13 at 5:53
    
I don't think that I can help you here.. to me your model make no sense.. Just think that what logic should the EF use to load the Roles associated with a particular User and wise-versa.. I think even if it work in your local environment it must be loading the wrong data set.. –  Nirosh Feb 13 at 6:42
    
EF Code First makes implicit assumptions about property naming conventions and relationship, and generates a schema based on those assumptions. If you have an int property called "Id", EF code first will assume that it is a Primary Key Identity column in the database, unless you explictly set another property as key. EF Code First works with Convention over Configuration a lot so that you can remain consistent and write less code. Thanks for the attempt, anyway! –  Jason Feb 13 at 21:46

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