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To start, the max size of this list is 30 and the number of items in each list created is stored in num_items, which is incremented and decremented by push and pop methods i have elsewhere but i am wondering if i need to keep track of the num_items here as well. I will show the output i'm expecting along with the output i am getting:

enter image description here

I will now show the code that copies my stack:

void operator=(const Stack& s)
    {
        if (s.top == NULL)
            top = NULL;
        else
        {
            top = new Node;
            top->data = s.top->data;
            Node* newP = top;

                for(Node* curr = s.top->link; curr != NULL; curr = curr->link)
                {
                    if(num_items != MAX_SIZE)
                    {
                    newP->link = new Node;
                    newP = newP->link;
                    newP->data = curr->data;
                    }
                }
        }
    }

The code that is supplying the output is:

Stack<int> s2(s1); // s2 declared as a copy of s1
    cout << "*declare s2 as a copy of s1 (stack s2(s1))\ns2=" << s2 << endl;
    cout << "s2.Size()=" << s2.Size() << endl;
    cout << "s2.IsEmpty()=" << ((s2.IsEmpty()) ? "T" : "F") << endl;
    cout << "s2.IsFull()=" << ((s2.IsFull()) ? "T" : "F") << endl;
    cout << "s2.Peek()=" << s2.Peek() << endl;
    cout << endl;

Edit:

After initializing num_items = 0; in the code i will show below

        void operator=(const Stack& s)
    {
        if (s.top == NULL)
            top = NULL;
        else
        {
            top = new Node;
            top->data = s.top->data;
            Node* newP = top;

                for(Node* curr = s.top->link; curr != NULL; curr = curr->link)
                {
                    num_items = 0;
                    if(num_items != MAX_SIZE)
                    {
                    newP->link = new Node;
                    newP = newP->link;
                    newP->data = curr->data;
                    num_items++;
                    }
                }
        }
    }

The output i get for my size turns out to be 1, i will show the whole output again in an image:

enter image description here

Second Edit:

I have now modified my code to the following:

void operator=(const Stack& s)
    {
        if (s.top == NULL)
            top = NULL;
        else
        {
            top = new Node;
            top->data = s.top->data;
            Node* newP = top;
                num_items = 0;
                for(Node* curr = s.top->link; curr = NULL; curr = curr->link)

                {

                    if(num_items != MAX_SIZE)
                    cout<< num_items;
                    {
                    newP->link = new Node;
                    newP = newP->link;
                    newP->data = curr->data;
                    ++num_items;
                    }
                }
        }
    }

with this though i my size only counts up to 9 instead of 10, i figure because my loop is skipping over 0 or "NULL" rather, but there must be a way to make it stop doing that.

share|improve this question
2  
First of all, thanks for a detailed question. Unfortunately we are missing a key component: what are the attributes of Stack and Node and what do their constructors look like (if any) ? My guess: you forget to initialize copy num_items in the copy constructor (or operator=), and thus it starts with a random value. –  Matthieu M. Feb 13 '14 at 8:25
    
If you do Stack<int> s2(s1) or Stack<int> s2=s1, you are calling copy constructor instead of operator=. When you do Stack<int> s2; .........; s2=s1;, you are calling operator=. –  Haozhun Feb 13 '14 at 8:25
    
@MatthieuM. i edited it a little bit to include the intialization of num_items in operator= but it doesn't continue to increment when the other elements are copied, Stack is my class and it's constructor looks like Stack(const Stack& s) { *this = s; } As for node i believe it's just a pointer, but i feel i may be wrong. –  Breon Thibodeaux Feb 13 '14 at 8:36
    
@BreonThibodeaux: note: you reset num_items to 0 at each turn of the for loop because it's inside instead of being outside. –  Matthieu M. Feb 13 '14 at 8:38
2  
@BreonThibodeaux: do you know ideone or coliru ? Those are online compilers. You can set the language to C++, and create a minimal example, then compile it and run it. It would be great if you could reproduce your issue there, and then give a link to your failing program, so that we can have a chance to look at it and tweak it. –  Matthieu M. Feb 13 '14 at 8:58

2 Answers 2

A single list is best copied while maintaining a Node** store pointing to the variable that needs to be set to the next Node*:

void operator=( const Stack& rhs ){ // or return Stack&
  // call this->clear() to avoid memory leak
  if( rhs.top == NULL ){ top = NULL; return /* *this */; }
  Node** store = &top;
  for( Node* curr = rhs.top; curr != NULL; curr = curr->link ){
    Node* newNode = new Node;
    num_items++;
    newNode->data = curr->data;
    *store = newNode;
    store = &newNode->link;
  }
  return /* *this */;
}

This assignment operator will produce a memory leak unless care is taken to remove any existing entries. Perhaps there's already a clear() method?

Later: These constructors might be used:

Stack() : num_items(0), top(NULL) {}
Stack( const Stack& other ) {
  *this = other;
}

This clear method should be used where indicated:

void clear(){
  Node* curr = top;
  while( curr != NULL ){
    Node* next = curr->link;
    delete curr;
    curr = next;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This code works for my 3rd copy! it gave back a size of 10 but for my 2nd copy it gave back a size of 300k+, i'm not very sure how this number came about –  Breon Thibodeaux Feb 13 '14 at 9:37
    
Check your constructor - it should set num_items to 0. Or do call clear(). –  laune Feb 13 '14 at 10:55
    
The thing about this is that my signature for this method has to be void operator=(const Stack &s), which confuses me on if i can actually use this –  Breon Thibodeaux Feb 13 '14 at 21:15
    
Stack() { top = NULL; curr = NULL; num_items = 0; } Stack(const Stack& s) { *this = s; } If that is legible, these are the constructors that i am using now, well many wouldn't see the second one as a constructor but that's how it was taught to me in class. –  Breon Thibodeaux Feb 13 '14 at 21:18
    
operator= should follow the general pattern of being an expression returning the LHS (principle of least surprise). Constructors are OK either way. All clear now? –  laune Feb 14 '14 at 4:34
Stack<int> s2(s1);

This calls the default copy constructor and not the operator=. However, since your copy logic is implemented in the operator=, the nodes are never copied into s2.

You need to write a copy constructor and move the logic from operator= into it:

Stack(const Stack & other)
{
    // Copy other stack here
}
share|improve this answer
    
You can implement the copy constructor using *this = other, leave the code where it is, and thus keep operator=. –  laune Feb 13 '14 at 9:07

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