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I fear I may be losing my marbles today, because I don't know how to do what I want to. I want a custom prompt that I can call from any of my other JavaScript functions. I don't know how to get this work, even though it feels like I've done it a hundred times.

Here is an example

var modal = function() {

    var prompt = function(msg) {
        // custom prompt builder here... let's return hard coded for example's sake
        return true;
    };

}();

var items = function() {
    var init = function() {

        $('.delete').click(function() {
            var confirm = modal.prompt('Are you sure you wanna delete that pal?');
        });

    };    


    $(document).ready(init);    
}();

What I want to be able to do is call the prompt method of modal, and get a return value based on the user input. Now this, I can do, but I am having problems calling the inner method. I want to group these together because I will probably have a custom modal alert() too.

Please don't suggest the built in JavaScript OK/Cancel as I gotta do this custom.

Many thanks!

share|improve this question
2  
Aside: if you're calling an anonymous function immediately, it's good practice to parenthesize the function. This makes the call more noticeable. If you don't, someone might not notice the trailing () an mistake your intent. – outis Feb 1 '10 at 5:56
    
@otis Do you mean wrap the whole thing in an extra pair or parenthesis? I think I have seem that before. Thanks for the tip. – alex Feb 1 '10 at 5:58
    
You will not be able to get a return value based on user input anyway,since the script will execute in its entirety (return statement and all) before user interaction gets into the picture. You'll have to use a different flow, that relies on callbacks for this. You will not be able to mimic the native behavior of prompt. – David Hedlund Feb 1 '10 at 5:58
up vote 4 down vote accepted

From the way you call modal.prompt, it appears you want the anonymous function to return an object that will be stored in modal:

var modal = (function() {
    // various private fields & methods here
    ...
    // the public interface
    var self = {
        prompt: function(msg) {
            // custom prompt builder here... let's return hard coded for example's sake
            return true;
        }
    };
    return self;
})();
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the extra useful comments. – alex Feb 1 '10 at 6:04

For your first issue, the prompt function, is declared as a variable within your modal object, you can't access it because you aren't actually exposing it publicly:

var modal = (function() {
  var privateMethod1 = function () {/*...*/},
      privateVar = 'foo';

  function privateMethod2() {
    //...
  }

  return { // public members
    prompt: function (msg) {
      // custom prompt builder here... let's return hard coded for example's sake
      return true;
    }
  };
})();

Now for the following issue:

What I want to be able to do is call the prompt method of modal, and get a return value based on the user input.

The user input is an asynchronous action, I would recommend you to use a callback based model, the built-in JavaScript OK/Cancel window.prompt can actually return a value, because it stops the code execution and waits for the user input.

var modal = (function() {
    return {
      prompt: function(msg, okCallback, cancelCallback) {
        // ...

        $('#okButton').click(function () {
          // internal actions here, like closing the dialog, cleanup, etc...
          okCallback(); // execute the ok callback
        });

        $('#cancelButton').click(function () {
          // ...
          cancelCallback(); // execute the cancel callback
        });
      }
    };
})();
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks CMS, great answer. +1 – alex Feb 1 '10 at 6:05

I strongly recommend anyone who is going to make a habit of writing javascript code read and understand this http://www.jibbering.com/faq/faq_notes/closures.html.

It's critically important.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Alex may or may not be confusing closures with properties, but it's such a great document. – outis Feb 1 '10 at 5:59
    
The document covers more than closures. It covers scope in detail. – Jotham Feb 1 '10 at 6:00

Have you tried:

var modal = {
    prompt : function(msg) {
           return true;
         }
};

and then you can cal it like:

modal.prompt();
share|improve this answer
    
I think you mean to suggest: var modal = { prompt : function(msg) { return true; } }; – Bruce Feb 1 '10 at 5:52
    
Yep............ – Fitzchak Yitzchaki Feb 1 '10 at 5:59

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