Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have 3 stored procedures (simplified, please try to ignore why I'm updating the table twice and why the SP is called twice):

CREATE SP1 AS
BEGIN TRANSACTION

   -- Updated twice
   UPDATE Customers SET Name = 'something' Where Id = 1 OUTPUT INSERTED.*
   UPDATE Customers SET Name = 'something'

   COMMIT TRANSACTION;
END

CREATE SP2 AS
BEGIN TRANSACTION
   UPDATE Customers SET Name = 'anothername'
   COMMIT TRANSACTION;
END

CREATE SP3 AS
BEGIN TRANSACTION

    -- Called twice 
    EXEC SP2
    EXEC SP2

    COMMIT TRANSACTION;
END 

The problem is that I got a deadlock from sql server. It says that SP1 and SP3 are both waiting for the Customers table resource. Does it make sense? Could it be because of the inner transaction in SP2? or maybe the use of OUTPUT statement...?

The lock is a Key lock on the PK of Customers. The requested lock mode of each waiting SP is U and the owner is X (The other object i guess).

A few more details: 1. These are called from the same user multiple times on different processes. 2. The statements are called twice only for the sake of the example. 3. In my actual code, Customer is actualy called 'Pending Instructions'. The instructions table is sampled every minute by each listener (computer, actualy). 4. The first update query first gets all the pending instructions and the second one updates the status of the entire table to completed, just to make sure that none are left in pending mode. 5. SP3 is calling SP2 twice because it updates 2 proprietory instructions row, this happens once a day.

Thanks a lot!!

share|improve this question
1  
Are you always updating the complete customers table or only a subset? Are these stored procedures called linear or from different users multiple times? And excuse me for asking, but why are you updating them twice? :) –  Pieter Feb 13 at 13:04
    
Added some more info in question, please have a look. First update is 1 row, second is entire table. Called from different users multiple times. –  Uri Abramson Feb 13 at 13:13

1 Answer 1

Why are you surprised by this? You have written the book case for a deadlock and hit it.

The first update query first gets all the pending instructions and the second one updates the status of the entire table to completed.

Yes, this will deadlock. Two concurrent calls will find different 'pending' instructions (as new 'pending' instructions can be inserted in between). Then they will proceed to attempt to update the entire table and block on each other, deadlock. Here is the timeline:

  1. Table contains customer:1, pending
  2. T1 (running first update of SP1) updates table and modifies customer:1
  3. T2 inserts a new record, customer:2, pending
  4. T3 (running first update of SP1) updates table and modifies customer:2
  5. T1 (running second update of SP1) tries to update all table, is blocked by T3
  6. T3 (running second update of SP1) tries to update all table, is blocked by T1. Deadlock.

I have good news though: the deadlock is the best outcome you can get. A far worse outcome is when your logic missed 'pending' customers (which will happen more often). simply stated, your SP1 will erroneously mark any new 'pending' customer inserted after the first update as 'processed', when it was actually just skipped. Here is the timeline:

  1. Table contains customer:1, pending
  2. T1 (running first update of SP1) updates table and modifies customer:1
  3. T2 inserts a new record, customer:2, pending
  4. T1 (running second update of SP1) tries updates the whole table. customer:2 was pending and is reset w/o actually had been processed (is not i SP1's result set).
  5. Your business lost an update.

so I suggest to go back to the drawing board and design SP1 properly. I suggest SP1 should only update on the second statement what it had updated on on the first one, for instance. Posting real code, with proper DDL, would go along way toward getting a useful solution.

share|improve this answer
    
Added, thank you for your help. –  Uri Abramson Feb 13 at 13:45
1  
By the way, your answer is not accurate because i'm not doing any Inserts there. –  Uri Abramson Feb 13 at 14:03
    
I think it has something to do with first locking the table and then the PK, Not inserts. I'm not sure though... –  Uri Abramson Feb 13 at 15:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.